Parvovirus B19 Infection

N Engl J of Medicine December 13, 2018

IMAGES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE

Mende and K. Sockel

A 67-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 6-week history of progressive exertional dyspnea. Her medical history was notable for lung transplantation that had been performed 8 years earlier. Immunosuppressive medications included mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus……

LINK

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm1807156?query=TOC

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December 14, 2018 at 8:52 am

Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of Hepatitis A Vaccine for Postexposure Prophylaxis and for Preexposure Prophylaxis for International Travel

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2018;67(43):1216-1220.

Update

Noele P. Nelson, MD, PhD1; Ruth Link-Gelles, PhD1; Megan G. Hofmeister, MD1; José R. Romero, MD2; Kelly L. Moore, MD3; John W. Ward, MD1; Sarah F. Schillie, MD1

Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) with hepatitis A (HepA) vaccine or immune globulin (IG) effectively prevents infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) when administered within 2 weeks of exposure. Preexposure prophylaxis against HAV infection through the administration of HepA vaccine or IG provides protection for unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries that have high or intermediate HAV endemicity. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Hepatitis Vaccines Work Group conducted a systematic review of the evidence for administering vaccine for PEP to persons aged >40 years and reviewed the HepA vaccine efficacy and safety in infants and the benefits of protection against HAV before international travel….

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/pdfs/mm6743a5-H.pdf

December 10, 2018 at 3:44 pm

Highlights From International Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis and Pyelonephritis in Women: A 2010 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice July 2011 V.19 N.4 P.282-283

Clinical Guidelines

File, Thomas M. Jr

A panel of international experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America in collaboration with the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases to update the 1999 uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) guidelines.

The focus of the recommendations is on women with uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis.

Since the 1999 guideline, antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens causing urinary tract infections has increased, and newer agents and different duration of therapy have been studied.

This update reflects many of the changes since the 1999 guideline.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/infectdis/Fulltext/2011/07000/Highlights_From_International_Clinical_Practice.15.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

 

December 7, 2018 at 9:31 am

Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Endocarditis: Making an Impact on Outcomes: The Role of the Patient and the Organism

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice July 2011 V.19 N.4 P.238-242

NFID Clinical Updates

Weinstein, Robert A.

Three scientific approaches to infectious disease-case series, epidemiologic investigation, and molecular analysis-have aided researchers in understanding the evolution of pathogen activity.

Four eras of pathogen activity have occurred from 1920 to the present (streptococcus, staphylococci, gram-negative rods, and multidrug-resistant organisms).

The emergence of health care-associated and community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has resulted in the blurred distinction among the entities.

In addition, there are several virulence factors that contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) play an important role in determining an individual’s response to infection.

Health outcomes are significantly worse in MRSA patients compared with uninfected patients or those infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA).

Ongoing molecular research will continue to elucidate mechanisms associated with virulence of MRSA.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/infectdis/Fulltext/2011/07000/Staphylococcus_aureus_Bacteremia_and_Endocarditis_.2.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

December 7, 2018 at 9:30 am

Highlights From Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America for the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Adults and Children

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice May 2011 V.19 N.3 P.207-20

Clinical Guidelines

File, Thomas M. Jr

Recently, the Infectious Diseases Society published evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

The guideline discusses the management of a variety of infections including skin infections, bacteremia and endocarditis, pneumonia, and osteomyelitis and joint infections.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/infectdis/Fulltext/2011/05000/Highlights_From_Clinical_Practice_Guidelines_by.13.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

December 7, 2018 at 9:28 am

The Most Effective Treatments for Clostridium difficile Diarrhea: An Evidence-Based Review

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice May 2011 V.19 N.3 P.171-181

Griffin, Allen Thomas; Arnold, Forest Wayne

Clostridium difficile is more common, more virulent, and more difficult to treat than in past decades.

Oral vancomycin and metronidazole have been the subject of the most rigorous study in this disease. Although these antibiotics have largely been viewed as equivalent, studies support vancomycin for severe disease, whereas metronidazole is noninferior in milder disease.

Both antibiotics are superior to the toxin-binding agent tolevamer. No evidence supports probiotics for initial disease, but there may be utility in relapsing disease. There is an exiguous evidence base regarding antibiotic treatment of relapsing disease, but tapered and pulsed regimens of vancomycin remain possible options.

Preliminary evidence supports the use of monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins A and B for relapsing episodes.

The studies concerning refractory disease are limited to a case series design, whereas it remains unclear how effective probiotics are in the prevention of C. difficile infection.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/infectdis/Fulltext/2011/05000/The_Most_Effective_Treatments_for_Clostridium.7.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

December 7, 2018 at 9:26 am

Managing an Elusive Pathogen: Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in a Variety of Care Settings

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice May 2011 V.19 N.3 P.150-155

NFID Clinical Updates

Poretz, Donald M.; Rehm, Susan J.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections continue to be a major problem both within hospitals (hospital-acquired MRSA) and increasingly in community settings (community-acquired MRSA), leading to well-publicized media reports and, as a result, greater public awareness of this problem.

Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish between a MRSA and a methicillin-sensitive S. aureus skin and soft tissue infection, and this should be taken into consideration when initiating empiric therapy.

There are several oral and intravenous antibiotics available to treat MRSA infections, some of which are inexpensive, whereas others are extremely costly; all have potential adverse effects and possible drug-drug interactions with which the prescriber should be familiar.

Careful monitoring of patients who receive outpatient intravenous antibiotics and an understanding of various intravenous devices and their associated possible complications in addition to knowledge of the economics involved are essential to make cost-effective decisions.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/infectdis/Fulltext/2011/05000/Managing_an_Elusive_Pathogen__Treatment_of.2.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

December 7, 2018 at 9:24 am

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