Early versus Standard Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-Infected Adults in Haiti

July 27, 2010 at 6:47 pm Leave a comment

N Engl J of Medicine Jul.15, 2010 V.363  N.3  p.257-265

Patrice Severe, M.D., Marc Antoine Jean Juste, M.D., Alex Ambroise, M.D., Ludger Eliacin, M.D., Claudel Marchand, M.D., Sandra Apollon, B.S., Alison Edwards, M.S., Heejung Bang, Ph.D., Janet Nicotera, R.N., Catherine Godfrey, M.D., Roy M. Gulick, M.D., Warren D. Johnson, Jr., M.D., Jean William Pape, M.D., and Daniel W. Fitzgerald, M.D.

ABSTRACT

Background

For adults with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who have CD4+ T-cell counts that are greater than 200 and less than 350 per cubic millimeter and who live in areas with limited resources, the optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy remains uncertain.

Methods

We conducted a randomized, open-label trial of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy, as compared with the standard timing for initiation of therapy, among HIV-infected adults in Haiti who had a confirmed CD4+ T-cell count that was greater than 200 and less than 350 per cubic millimeter at baseline and no history of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) illness. The primary study end point was survival. The early-treatment group began taking zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz therapy within 2 weeks after enrollment. The standard-treatment group started the same regimen of antiretroviral therapy when their CD4+ T-cell count fell to 200 per cubic millimeter or less or when clinical AIDS developed. Participants in both groups underwent monthly follow-up assessments and received isoniazid and trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis with nutritional support.

Results

Between 2005 and 2008, a total of 816 participants — 408 per group — were enrolled and were followed for a median of 21 months. The CD4+ T-cell count at enrollment was approximately 280 per cubic millimeter in both groups. There were 23 deaths in the standard-treatment group, as compared with 6 in the early-treatment group (hazard ratio with standard treatment, 4.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6 to 9.8; P=0.001). There were 36 incident cases of tuberculosis in the standard-treatment group, as compared with 18 in the early-treatment group (hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.6; P=0.01).

Conclusions

Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy decreased the rates of death and incident tuberculosis. Access to antiretroviral therapy should be expanded to include all HIV-infected adults who have CD4+ T-cell counts of less than 350 per cubic millimeter, including those who live in areas with limited resources. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00120510 [ClinicalTrials.gov].)

abstract

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/363/3/257?query=TOC

PDF

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/reprint/363/3/257.pdf

Entry filed under: Antirretrovirales, HIV/SIDA, HIV/SIDA HAART.

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