Risk factors for hospital-acquired bacteremia.

April 22, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Intern Med. 2005 Nov;44(11):1157-62.

Yoshida T1, Tsushima K, Tsuchiya A, Nishikawa N, Shirahata K, Kaneko K, Ito K, Kawakami H, Nakagawa S, Suzuki T, Kubo K, Ikeda S.

1Department of Medicine, Azumi General Hospital, Nagano.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Bacteremia is one of the most serious health problems associated with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for bacteremia in daily medical care to facilitate rapid and accurate clinical decisions about treatment.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We studied 306 inpatients retrospectively. Age, peripheral neutrophil count, C-reactive protein (CRP), platelets, serum total cholesterol, total protein, albumin and cholinesterase were compared in patients with positive- and negative-blood cultures. The associations between blood culture positivity and glucose tolerance, bedridden state, presence of a central venous catheter (CVC) or urinary catheter were examined. On October 14, 2002, strategies for prevention of catheter-related infection were altered in our hospital. We studied the impact of these changes on the risk of bacteremia.

RESULTS:

Sixty-seven patients had positive and 239 had negative blood cultures. Age, neutrophil, platelets, total protein, albumin, and cholinesterase were significantly different between the culture-positive patients and the culture-negative patients. Multivariate analysis showed albumin and platelets as independent predictors. The bedridden state and catheter-inserted states (central venous or urinary) conferred significantly higher positive blood culture rates. Multivariate analysis showed using urinary catheters and indwelling femoral CVCs as independent risk factors. There was no significant difference in the blood culture-positive rate before and after the change in prevention strategies; before the change, 6 of 9 catheter-inserted blood culture-positive cases yielded MRSA, while 4 of 12 cultures yielded Staphylococcus epidermidis after the change.

CONCLUSION:

Our study highlights the risk factors of bacteremia in vulnerable patients.

PDF

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/internalmedicine/44/11/44_11_1157/_pdf

Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos, Bacterias, Bacteriemias, Epidemiología, F.O.D, Health Care-Associated Infections, Infecciones asociadas a catater IV, Infecciones cardio-vasculares, Infecciones nosocomiales, Metodos diagnosticos, Sepsis.

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