Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997-2006.

January 27, 2015 at 8:51 am

Clinical Infectious Diseases April 1, 2008 V.46 N.7 P.970-6

Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J

1AIDS Education and Training Center, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California

2Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vectorborne, and Enteric Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

Reprints or correspondence: Dr. John Painter, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd., Mailstop E-03, Atlanta, GA 30333 (jpainter@cdc.gov).

BACKGROUND

Infections due to Vibrio species cause an estimated 8000 illnesses annually, often through consumption of undercooked seafood. Like foodborne Vibrio infections, nonfoodborne Vibrio infections (NFVI) also result in serious illness, but awareness of these infections is limited.

METHODS

We analyzed illnesses occuring during the period 1997-2006 that were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Cholera and Other Vibrio Illness Surveillance system. The diagnosis of NFVI required isolation of Vibrio species from a patient with contact with seawater.

RESULTS

Of 4754 Vibrio infections reported, 1210 (25%) were NFVIs. Vibrio vulnificus infections were the most common (accounting for 35% of NFVIs), with 72% of V. vulnificus infections reported from residents of Gulf Coast states. Infections due to V. vulnificus resulted in fever (72% of cases), cellulitis (85%), amputation (10%), and death (17%). V. vulnificus caused 62 NFVI-associated deaths (78%). Recreational activities accounted for 70% of exposures for patients with NFVIs associated with all species. Patients with liver disease were significantly more likely to die as a result of infection (odds ratio, 7.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.8-21.9). Regardless of pre-existing conditions, patients were more likely to die when hospitalization occurred >2 days after symptom onset (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.8).

CONCLUSION

NFVIs, especially those due to V. vulnificus, demonstrate high morbidity and mortality. Persons with liver disease should be advised of the risks associated with seawater exposure if a wound is already present or is likely to occur. Clinicians should consider Vibrio species as an etiologic agent in infections occurring in persons with recent seawater exposure, even if the individual was only exposed during recreational marine activities. Immediate antibiotic treatment with aggressive monitoring is advised in suspected cases.

PDF

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/46/7/970.full.pdf+html

Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos, Bacterias, Bacteriemias, Epidemiología, Infecciones en piel y tej blandos, Medicina del viajero, Metodos diagnosticos, Sepsis. Tags: .

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