Colistin-associated Acute Kidney Injury in Severely Ill Patients: A Step Toward a Better Renal Care? A Prospective Cohort Study

December 1, 2015 at 7:04 am

Clin Infect Dis. (2015) 61 (12): 1771-1777
Editor’s choice
Colistin-associated Acute Kidney Injury in Severely Ill Patients: A Step Toward a Better Renal Care? A Prospective Cohort Study
Lidia Dalfino, Filomena Puntillo, Maria Josephine Mura Ondok, Adriana Mosca, Rosa Monno, Sara Coppolecchia, Maria Luigia Spada, Francesco Bruno, and Nicola Brienza
1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation
2Microbiology Section, Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine
3Department of Basic Medical Science, Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University “Aldo Moro” of Bari, Italy
Background

Critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock may need relatively high colistin daily doses for efficacy against multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant gram-negative rods. However, acute kidney injury (AKI) may represent a major dose-limiting adverse effect of colistin. We sought to determine AKI occurrence and to identify factors influencing AKI risk in severely ill patients receiving colistin according to a recently proposed dosing strategy.
Methods

A prospective, observational, cohort study involving patients with severe sepsis or septic shock who received colistin was performed. AKI was defined according to Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. Colistin administration was driven by a modified pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK/PD)–based dosing approach.
Results

Of 70 patients who received colistin at a median daily dose of 9 million IU (MIU; interquartile range, 5.87–11.1 MIU), 31 (44%) developed AKI. In univariate analysis, age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), score and baseline renal impairment were significantly associated with AKI. Moreover, patients with AKI were less frequently treated with adjuvant ascorbic acid (P = .003). In multivariate analysis, independent predictors of AKI were baseline renal impairment (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.9–9.2; P < .001) and age (1.03; 1.0–1.05; P = .028), whereas a strong independent renal-protective role emerged for ascorbic acid (0.27; .12–.57; P < .001).
Conclusions

In severely ill patients receiving colistin according to a PK/PD-driven dosing approach, baseline renal impairment and older age strongly predict AKI occurrence, but concomitant administration of ascorbic acid markedly reduces AKI risk, allowing safer use of colistin.
PDF
http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/61/12/1771.full.pdf

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Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos.

Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria. Prevention and control of multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: recommendations from a Joint Working Party.


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