VRE and VSE Bacteremia Outcomes in the Era of Effective VRE Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

March 26, 2016 at 10:39 pm

Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology January 2016 V.37 N.1 P.26 – 35  

Chatura Prematunge, Colin MacDougall, Jennie Johnstone, Kwaku Adomako, Freda Lam, Jennifer Robertson and Gary Garber

a1 Infection Prevention and Control, Public Health Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

a2 St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

a3 Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

a4 Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

a5 Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Address correspondence to Jennie Johnstone, MD, PhD, Public Health Ontario, 480 University Avenue, Suite 300, Toronto ON M5G 1V2 (jennie.johnstone@oahpp.ca)

BACKGROUND

Prior data suggest that vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia is associated with worse outcomes than vancomycin-sensitive Enterococcus (VSE) bacteremia. However, many studies evaluating such outcomes were conducted prior to the availability of effective VRE therapies.

OBJECTIVE

To systematically review VRE and VSE bacteremia outcomes among hospital patients in the era of effective VRE therapy.

METHODS

Electronic databases and grey literature published between January 1997 and December 2014 were searched to identify all primary research studies comparing outcomes of VRE and VSE bacteremias among hospital patients, following the availability of effective VRE therapies. The primary outcome was all-cause, in-hospital mortality, while total hospital length of stay (LOS) was a secondary outcome. All meta-analyses were conducted in Review Manager 5.3 using random-effects, inverse variance modeling.

RESULTS

Among all the studies reviewed, 12 cohort studies and 1 case control study met inclusion criteria. Similar study designs were combined in meta-analyses for mortality and LOS. VRE bacteremia was associated with increased mortality compared with VSE bacteremia among cohort studies (odds ratio [OR], 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38–2.35; I2=0%; n=11); the case-control study estimate was similar, but not significant (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 0.97–3.82). LOS was greater for VRE bacteremia patients than for VSE bacteremia patients (mean difference, 5.01 days; 95% CI, 0.58–9.44]; I2=0%; n=5).

CONCLUSIONS

Despite the availability of effective VRE therapy, VRE bacteremia remains associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality and LOS when compared to VSE bacteremia.

abstract

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=10079501&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0899823X15002287

PDF

http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2F4593_A0BF3ACC8D2EDAF7E0620AD71E06C8B2_journals__ICE_ICE37_01_S0899823X15002287a.pdf&cover=Y&code=ddb819e51f92340479829c68c457666d

Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos, Bacterias, Bacteriemias, Meta-Análisis, Metodos diagnosticos, Resistencia bacteriana, REVIEWS, Sepsis, Update. Tags: .

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