Archive for April 24, 2016

Listeriosis during Pregnancy: A Public Health Concern.

ISRN Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Sep 26;2013:851712. doi: 10.1155/2013/851712.

Mateus T1, Silva J, Maia RL, Teixeira P.

Author information

1Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina (CBQF) Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa/Porto, Rua Dr. António Bernardino Almeida, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal ; Departamento de Medicina Veterinária (EUVG), Escola Universitária Vasco da Gama, Coimbra, Portugal.

Abstract

Listeria was first described in 1926 by Murray, Webb, and Swann, who discovered it while investigating an epidemic infection among laboratory rabbits and guinea pigs. The role of Listeria monocytogenes as a foodborne pathogen was definitively recognized during the 1980s. This recognition was the consequence of a number of epidemic human outbreaks due to the consumption of contaminated foods, in Canada, in the USA and in Europe. Listeriosis is especially severe in immunocompromised individuals such as pregnant women. The disease has a low incidence of infection, although this is undeniably increasing, with a high fatality rate amongst those infected. In pregnant women listeriosis may cause abortion, fetal death, or neonatal morbidity in the form of septicemia and meningitis. Improved education concerning the disease, its transmission, and prevention measures for immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women has been identified as a pressing need.

PDF

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3804396/pdf/ISRN.OBGYN2013-851712.pdf

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April 24, 2016 at 2:17 pm

Infections by Listeria monocytogenes.

Rev Chilena Infectol. 2013 Aug;30(4):417-25.

[Article in Spanish]

Sedano R1, Fica A, Guiñez D, Braun S, Porte L, Dabanch J, Weitzel T, Soto A.

Author information

1Departamento de Medicina, Hospital Militar de Santiago, Santiago, Chile.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Listeria monocytogenes infections have been poorly characterized in Chile.

AIM:

To evaluate clinical manifestations and risk factors associated to a fatal outcome in a series of patients.

METHODS:

retrospective analysis of cases from 1991 to 2012.

RESULTS:

Twenty three cases were identified, including 2 diagnosed after prolonged hospitalization (8.7%) with an average age of 68.4 years (range 44-90). Known predisposing factors were age > 65 years (60.9%), diabetes mellitus (40.9%), and immunosuppression (27.3%). Most cases presented after 2003 (70%). No cases associated with neonates, pregnancy or HIV infections were recorded. Patients presented with central nervous system (CNS) infection (39%), including 8 cases of meningitis and one of rhomboencephalitis; bacteremia (43.5%), including one case with endocarditis; abscesses (8.7%); and other infections (spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and pneumonia; 8.7%). Risky food consumption was found in 80% of those asked about it. Predominant clinical manifestations were fever (90.9%), and confusion (63.6%). CNS infections were associated to headache (OR 21, p < 0.05), nausea and vomiting (OR 50, p < 0.01). Only 45.5% received initial appropriate empirical therapy and 36.4% a synergistic combination. Eight patients died (34.8%), this outcome was associated to bacteremia (OR 8.25; IC95 1.2-59 p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

monocytogenes infections appear to be increasing in Chile, causing infections in different sites, attacking vulnerable patients, and have a high case-fatality ratio, especially among those with bacteremia.

PDF

http://www.scielo.cl/pdf/rci/v30n4/art11.pdf

April 24, 2016 at 2:15 pm

Pregnancy and infection.

N Engl J Med. 2014 Jun 5;370(23):2211-8.

Kourtis AP1, Read JS, Jamieson DJ.

Author information

1From the Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta (A.P.K., D.J.J.); and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco (J.S.R.).

PDF

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459512/pdf/nihms655977.pdf

April 24, 2016 at 2:12 pm


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