Archive for May 16, 2016

Infectious Mononucleosis.

Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2015;390(Pt 1):211-40.

Dunmire SK1, Hogquist KA2, Balfour HH3.

Author information

1Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. dunmi002@umn.edu

2Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. hogqu001@umn.edu

3Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. balfo001@umn.edu

Abstract

Infectious mononucleosis is a clinical entity characterized by sore throat, cervical lymph node enlargement, fatigue, and fever most often seen in adolescents and young adults and lasting several weeks. It can be caused by a number of pathogens, but this chapter only discusses infectious mononucleosis due to primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that infects at least 90% of the population worldwide. The virus is spread by intimate oral contact among teenagers and young adults. How preadolescents acquire the virus is not known. A typical clinical picture with a positive heterophile test is usually sufficient to make the diagnosis, but heterophile antibodies are not specific and do not develop in some patients. EBV-specific antibody profiles are the best choice for staging EBV infection. In addition to causing acute illness, there can also be long-term consequences as the result of acquisition of the virus. Several EBV-related illnesses occur including certain cancers and autoimmune diseases, as well as complications of primary immunodeficiency in persons with the certain genetic mutations. A major obstacle to understanding these sequelae has been the lack of an efficient animal model for EBV infection, although progress in primate and mouse models has recently been made. Key future challenges are to develop protective vaccines and effective treatment regimens.

FULL TEXT

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4670567/

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May 16, 2016 at 9:57 pm

Common questions about infectious mononucleosis.

Am Fam Physician. 2015 Mar 15;91(6):372-6.

Womack J1, Jimenez M1.

Author information

1Rutgers University, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.

Abstract

Epstein-Barr is a ubiquitous virus that infects 95% of the world population at some point in life. Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections are often asymptomatic, some patients present with the clinical syndrome of infectious mononucleosis (IM). The syndrome most commonly occurs between 15 and 24 years of age. It should be suspected in patients presenting with sore throat, fever, tonsillar enlargement, fatigue, lymphadenopathy, pharyngeal inflammation, and palatal petechiae. A heterophile antibody test is the best initial test for diagnosis of EBV infection, with 71% to 90% accuracy for diagnosing IM. However, the test has a 25% false-negative rate in the first week of illness. IM is unlikely if the lymphocyte count is less than 4,000 mm3. The presence of EBV-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies confirms infection, but the test is more costly and results take longer than the heterophile antibody test. Symptomatic relief is the mainstay of treatment. Glucocorticoids and antivirals do not reduce the length or severity of illness. Splenic rupture is an uncommon complication of IM. Because physical activity within the first three weeks of illness may increase the risk of splenic rupture, athletic participation is not recommended during this time. Children are at the highest risk of airway obstruction, which is the most common cause of hospitalization from IM. Patients with immunosuppression are more likely to have fulminant EBV infection.

PDF

http://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0315/p372.pdf

May 16, 2016 at 9:55 pm

Infectious mononucleosis.

Clin Transl Immunology. 2015 Feb 27;4(2):e33.

Balfour HH Jr1, Dunmire SK2, Hogquist KA2.

Author information

1Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota Medical School , Minneapolis, MN, USA ; Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School , Minneapolis, MN, USA.

2Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota Medical School , Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Abstract

Infectious mononucleosis is a clinical entity characterized by pharyngitis, cervical lymph node enlargement, fatigue and fever, which results most often from a primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV, a lymphocrytovirus and a member of the γ-herpesvirus family, infects at least 90% of the population worldwide, the majority of whom have no recognizable illness. The virus is spread by intimate oral contact among adolescents, but how preadolescents acquire the virus is not known. During the incubation period of approximately 6 weeks, viral replication first occurs in the oropharynx followed by viremia as early as 2 weeks before onset of illness. The acute illness is marked by high viral loads in both the oral cavity and blood accompanied by the production of immunoglobulin M antibodies against EBV viral capsid antigen and an extraordinary expansion of CD8(+) T lymphocytes directed against EBV-infected B cells. During convalescence, CD8(+) T cells return to normal levels and antibodies develop against EBV nuclear antigen-1. A typical clinical picture in an adolescent or young adult with a positive heterophile test is usually sufficient to make the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis, but heterophile antibodies are not specific and do not develop in some patients especially young children. EBV-specific antibody profiles are the best choice for staging EBV infection. In addition to causing acute illness, long-term consequences are linked to infectious mononucleosis, especially Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple sclerosis. There is no licensed vaccine for prevention and no specific approved treatment. Future research goals are development of an EBV vaccine, understanding the risk factors for severity of the acute illness and likelihood of developing cancer or autoimmune diseases, and discovering anti-EBV drugs to treat infectious mononucleosis and other EBV-spurred diseases.

PDF

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4346501/pdf/cti20151a.pdf

May 16, 2016 at 9:54 pm


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