Archive for September 1, 2016

Mycoplasma genitalium Prevalence, Coinfection, and Macrolide Antibiotic Resistance Frequency in a Multicenter Clinical Study Cohort in the United States

Journal of Clinical Microbiology September 2016 V.54 N.9 P.2278-2283

Damon Getman, Alice Jiang, Meghan O’Donnell, and Seth Cohen

Damon Getmana, Alice Jianga, Meghan O’Donnella and Seth Cohenb*

aHologic, Inc., San Diego, California, USA

bOccidental College, Los Angeles, California, USA

Patel, Editor

Mayo Clinic

The prevalence rates of Mycoplasma genitalium infections and coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms and the frequency of a macrolide antibiotic resistance phenotype were determined in urogenital specimens collected from female and male subjects enrolled in a multicenter clinical study in the United States. Specimens from 946 subjects seeking care from seven geographically diverse clinical sites were tested for M. genitalium and for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis. Sequencing was used to assess macrolide antibiotic resistance among M. genitalium-positive subjects. M. genitalium prevalence rates were 16.1% for females and 17.2% for males. Significant risk factors for M. genitalium infections were black race, younger age, non-Hispanic ethnicity, and female symptomatic status. Female M. genitalium infections were significantly more prevalent than C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infections, while the M. genitalium infection rate in males was significantly higher than the N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis infection rates. The macrolide-resistant phenotype was found in 50.8% of females and 42% of males. These results show a high prevalence of M. genitalium single infections, a lower prevalence of coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms, and high rates of macrolide antibiotic resistance in a diverse sample of subjects seeking care across a wide geographic area of the United States.

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/9/2278.full.pdf+html

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September 1, 2016 at 2:24 pm

The First Fully Automated Molecular Diagnostic Panel for Meningitis and Encephalitis: How Well Does It Perform, and When Should It Be Used?

Journal of Clinical Microbiology September 2016 V.54 N.9 P.2222-2224

Kimberly E. Hanson

Department of Medicine, Division Infectious Diseases and Department of Pathology, Division of Clinical Microbiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

  1. J. McAdam, Editor

Boston Children’s Hospital

Rapid and accurate molecular diagnostic tests for the most common causes of infectious meningitis and encephalitis have the potential for high clinical impact. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Leber et al. (J Clin Microbiol 54:2251–2261, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00730-16) report results from a large clinical study designed to prospectively assess the performance of the FilmArray meningitis/encephalitis panel compared to conventional methods….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/9/2222.full.pdf+html

September 1, 2016 at 2:22 pm

The Brief Case: Cryptosporidiosis in a Severely Immunocompromised HIV Patient

Journal of Clinical Microbiology September 2016 V.54 N.9 P.2219-2221

Alessandro Rossi and Marc Roger Couturier

aDepartment of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

bARUP Laboratories, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

A 52-year-old male with AIDS was admitted to the University of Utah Hospital with chronic (>3-month duration) watery diarrhea. The patient had been diagnosed with HIV infection 3 years prior to admission but had been noncompliant with antiviral therapy since primary diagnosis. Three months prior to admission (at the time of the diarrhea onset), his CD4+ cell count was critically low (6 cells/μl), he had an elevated viral load (∼54,000 copies/ml), and he was displaying rapid deterioration of overall health. The patient also suffered from multiple other known viral complications attributable to his severe immunosuppression, including chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis and recurrent anogenital lesions caused by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2)…

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/9/2219.full.pdf+html

Closing the Brief Case: Cryptosporidiosis in a Severely Immunocompromised HIV Patient

Alessandro Rossi and Marc Roger Couturier

aDepartment of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

bARUP Laboratories, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

ANSWERS TO SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/9/2406.full.pdf+html

September 1, 2016 at 2:20 pm


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