Archive for October 27, 2016

A prospective view of animal and human Fasciolosis.

Parasite Immunol. 2016 Sep;38(9):558-68.

Cwiklinski K1, O’Neill SM2, Donnelly S3, Dalton JP4.

Author information

1School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK. k.cwiklinski@qub.ac.uk.

2School of Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.

3The i3 Institute & School of Medical and Molecular Biosciences, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

4School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK.

Abstract

Fasciolosis, a food-borne trematodiasis, results following infection with the parasites, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. These trematodes greatly affect the global agricultural community, infecting millions of ruminants worldwide and causing annual economic losses in excess of US $3 billion. Fasciolosis, an important zoonosis, is classified by WHO as a neglected tropical disease with an estimated 17 million people infected and a further 180 million people at risk of infection. The significant impact on agriculture and human health together with the increasing demand for animal-derived food products to support global population growth demonstrate that fasciolosis is a major One Health problem. This review details the problematic issues surrounding fasciolosis control, including drug resistance, lack of diagnosis and the threat that hybridization of the Fasciola species poses to future animal and human health. We discuss how these parasites may mediate their long-term survival through regulation and modulation of the host immune system, by altering the host immune homeostasis and/or by influencing the intestinal microbiome particularly in respect to concurrent infections with other pathogens. Large genome, transcriptome and proteomic data sets are now available to support an integrated One Health approach to develop novel diagnostic and control strategies for both animal and human disease.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5053257/pdf/PIM-38-558.pdf

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October 27, 2016 at 4:06 pm

Radiological Imaging Features of Fasciola hepatica Infection – A Pictorial Review.

J Clin Imaging Sci. 2012;2:2.

Dusak A1, Onur MR, Cicek M, Firat U, Ren T, Dogra VS.

Author information

1Department of Radiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, US.

Abstract

Fascioliasis refers to a zoonosis caused by Fasciola hepatica, a trematode infecting herbivores, but also occurs in humans who ingest the metacercaria found in fresh water plants. Infection in humans is common in developing countries and is also not uncommon in Europe. Diagnosis of this infection is difficult, as the history and symptoms are nonspecific and stool analysis for eggs is negative until the disease is in an advanced state by when the parasite has reached the biliary system. The clinical course consists of two phases; first a hepatic parenchymal phase in which immature larvae invade the liver parenchyma, followed by a ductal phase characterized by the excretion of larvae into the bile ducts. Parenchymal Phase: Ultrasonography (US) findings are nonspecific in this early phase. Computerized tomography (CT) may demonstrate subcapsular low attenuation regions in the liver. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) can also be utilized to establish liver parenchymal involvement, and is better than CT in characterizing hemorrhagic lesions, as well as identifying more lesions relative to CT. Ductal Phase: US examination is most useful at this stage, with its ability to demonstrate the live movement of the worms within the dilated ducts. A CT demonstrates dilated central biliary ducts with periportal tracking, whereas, mild ductal dilatation is poorly appreciated under MRI. Therefore, familiarity with the multimodality imaging features of fascioliasis, in combination with an available confirmatory enzyme-linked immunoassay, would be most helpful for early diagnosis

FULL TEXT

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3279695/

October 27, 2016 at 4:05 pm

Biliary fascioliasis–an uncommon cause of recurrent biliary colics: report of a case and brief review.

Ger Med Sci. 2012;10:Doc10.

Al Qurashi H1, Masoodi I, Al Sofiyani M, Al Musharaf H, Shaqhan M, All GN.

Author information

1Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Department of Medicine, King Abdul Aziz Specialist Hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Biliary parasitosis is one of the important causes of biliary obstruction in endemic areas, however due to migration and travel the disease is known to occur in non endemic zones as well. The spectrum of biliary fascioliasis ranges from recurrent biliary colics to acute cholangitis. The long term complications are gall stones, sclerosing cholangitis and biliary cirrhosis. We describe fascioliasis as a cause of recurrent biliary colics in a young male necessitating multiple hospitalizations over a period of four years. Investigative profile had been non-contributory every time he was hospitalized for his abdominal pain prior to the current presentation. He never had cholangitis due to the worm in the common bile duct. It was only at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) biliary fascioliasis was discovered to be the cause of his recurrent biliary colics. After removal of the live Fasciola hepatica from the common bile duct he became symptom free and is attending our clinic for last 11 months now. Clinical spectrum of biliary fascioliasis is discussed in this report.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3342511/pdf/GMS-10-10.pdf

October 27, 2016 at 4:03 pm


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