Chapare Virus, a Newly Discovered Arenavirus Isolated from a Fatal Hemorrhagic Fever Case in Bolivia

February 22, 2017 at 8:34 am

PLOS Pathogens APRIL 2008

Simon Delgado, Bobbie R. Erickson, Roberto Agudo, Patrick J. Blair, Efrain Vallejo, César G. Albariño, Jorge Vargas, James A. Comer, Pierre E. Rollin, Thomas G. Ksiazek, James G. Olson, Stuart T. Nichol

Simon Delgado – Centro de Salud de Eterazama, Cochabamba, Bolivia

Bobbie R. Erickson – Special Pathogens Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

Roberto Agudo – Servicio Departamental de Salud, Cochabamba, Bolivia

Patrick J. Blair – Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Lima, Peru

Efrain Vallejo – Servicio Departamental de Salud, Cochabamba, Bolivia

César G. Albariño – Special Pathogens Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

Jorge Vargas – Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Tropicales (CENETROP), Santa Cruz, Bolivia

James A. Comer – Special Pathogens Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

Pierre E. Rollin – Special Pathogens Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

Thomas G. Ksiazek – Special Pathogens Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

James G. Olson – Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Lima, Peru

Stuart T. Nichol – E-mail: snichol@cdc.gov – Special Pathogens Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

A small focus of hemorrhagic fever (HF) cases occurred near Cochabamba, Bolivia, in December 2003 and January 2004.

Specimens were available from only one fatal case, which had a clinical course that included fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and vomiting with subsequent deterioration and multiple hemorrhagic signs.

A non-cytopathic virus was isolated from two of the patient serum samples, and identified as an arenavirus by IFA staining with a rabbit polyvalent antiserum raised against South American arenaviruses known to be associated with HF (Guanarito, Machupo, and Sabiá).

RT-PCR analysis and subsequent analysis of the complete virus S and L RNA segment sequences identified the virus as a member of the New World Clade B arenaviruses, which includes all the pathogenic South American arenaviruses.

The virus was shown to be most closely related to Sabiá virus, but with 26% and 30% nucleotide difference in the S and L segments, and 26%, 28%, 15% and 22% amino acid differences for the L, Z, N, and GP proteins, respectively, indicating the virus represents a newly discovered arenavirus, for which we propose the name Chapare virus. In conclusion, two different arenaviruses, Machupo and Chapare, can be associated with severe HF cases in Bolivia.

PDF

http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1000047&type=printable

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Entry filed under: Biología Molecular, Epidemiología, FIEBRE en el POST-VIAJE, Infecciones emergentes, Infecciones virales, Medicina del viajero, Metodos diagnosticos, REPORTS, Sepsis, Update, Zoonosis.

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