Quantification of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen peptides allows rapid diagnosis of active disease and treatment monitoring.

May 11, 2017 at 11:28 am

Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. Apr 11, 2017 V.114 N.15 P.3969-3974.

Liu C1,2,3, Zhao Z4, Fan J1,3, Lyon CJ1,3, Wu HJ1,5, Nedelkov D6, Zelazny AM4, Olivier KN7, Cazares LH8, Holland SM9, Graviss EA10, Hu Y11,2,3.

Author information

1 Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030.

2 School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287.

3 Virginia G. Piper Biodesign Center for Personalized Diagnostics, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287.

4 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.

5 Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

6 Molecular Biomarkers Laboratory, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287.

7 Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892.

8 Molecular and Translational Sciences, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD 21702.

9 Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892.

10 Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030.

11 Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030; tyhu@asu.edu.

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health threat, resulting in an urgent unmet need for a rapid, non-sputum-based quantitative test to detect active Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections in clinically diverse populations and quickly assess Mtb treatment responses for emerging drug-resistant strains. We have identified Mtb-specific peptide fragments and developed a method to rapidly quantify their serum concentrations, using antibody-labeled and energy-focusing porous discoidal silicon nanoparticles (nanodisks) and high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) to enhance sensitivity and specificity. NanoDisk-MS diagnosed active Mtb cases with high sensitivity and specificity in a case-control study with cohorts reflecting the complexity of clinical practice. Similar robust sensitivities were obtained for cases of culture-positive pulmonary TB (PTB; 91.3%) and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB; 92.3%), and the sensitivities obtained for culture-negative PTB (82.4%) and EPTB (75.0%) in HIV-positive patients significantly outperformed those reported for other available assays. NanoDisk-MS also exhibited high specificity (87.1-100%) in both healthy and high-risk groups. Absolute quantification of serum Mtb antigen concentration was informative in assessing responses to antimycobacterial treatment. Thus, a NanoDisk-MS assay approach could significantly improve the diagnosis and management of active TB cases, and perhaps other infectious diseases as well.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5393254/pdf/pnas.201621360.pdf

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Biología Molecular, Epidemiología, Metodos diagnosticos, Micobacterias, REPORTS, Sepsis, Update.

Powassan Virus Disease in an Infant – Connecticut, 2016. Decolonization in Prevention of Health Care-Associated Infections.


Calendar

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr   Jun »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Most Recent Posts


%d bloggers like this: