Prevalence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria among nursing home residents: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

June 9, 2017 at 8:08 am

American Journal of Infection Control May 1, 2017 V.45 N.5 P.512-518

Sainfer Aliyu, MPhil, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN’MPhil, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN Sainfer Aliyu, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN Sainfer Aliyu, Arlene Smaldone, PhD, CPNP, CDE, Elaine Larson, PhD, RN, CIC, FAAN

Highlights

  • Multidrug resistant-gram negative bacteria colonization ranged from 11.2%-59.1%.
  • E coli accounted for the largest proportion of isolates.
  • The most common site of colonization was rectal, followed by nasal, sputum, urinary tract and wound.
  • Colonization was significantly higher in studies conducted in United States (38%) compared to other countries (14%).

Background

Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) are associated with an increasing proportion of infections among nursing home (NH) residents. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to critically review evidence of the prevalence of MDR-GNB among NH residents.

Methods

Following Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines, a systematic review of literature for the years 2005-2016 using multiple databases was conducted. Study quality, appraised by 2 reviewers, used Downs and Black risk of bias criteria. Studies reporting prevalence of MDR-GNB colonization were pooled using a random effects meta-analysis model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran Q and I2 statistics.

Results

Of 327 articles, 12 met the criteria for review; of these, 8 met the criteria for meta-analysis. Escherichia coli accounted for the largest proportion of isolates. Reported MDR-GNB colonization prevalence ranged from 11.2%-59.1%. Pooled prevalence for MDR-GNB colonization, representing data from 2,720 NH residents, was 27% (95% confidence interval, 15.2%-44.1%) with heterogeneity (Q = 405.6; P = .01; I2 = 98.3). Two studies reported MDR-GNB infection rates of 10.9% and 62.7%.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest a high prevalence of MDR-GNB colonization among NH residents, emphasizing the need to enhance policies for infection control and prevention (ICP) in NHs.

FULL TEXT

http://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(17)30085-8/fulltext

PDF

http://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(17)30085-8/pdf

 

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Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos, Bacterias, Bacteriemias, Epidemiología, Health Care-Associated Infections, Infecciones en seniles, Meta-Análisis, Metodos diagnosticos, Resistencia bacteriana, REVIEWS, Sepsis, Update.

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