Archive for June 28, 2017

European consensus-based (S2k) Guideline on the Management of Herpes Zoster – guided by the European Dermatology Forum (EDF) in cooperation with the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV), Part 2: TREATMENT.

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. January 2017 V.31 N.1 P.20-29.                        

Werner RN1, Nikkels AF2, Marinović B3, Schäfer M4, Czarnecka-Operacz M5, Agius AM6, Bata-Csörgő Z7, Breuer J8, Girolomoni G9, Gross GE10, Langan S11, Lapid-Gortzak R12, Lesser TH13, Pleyer U14, Sellner J15, Verjans GM16, Wutzler P17, Dressler C1, Erdmann R1, Rosumeck S1, Nast A1.

Author information

1 Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Division of Evidence-Based Medicine in Dermatology (dEBM), Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

2 Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center of Liège, Liège, Belgium.

3 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.

4 Department of Anesthesiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

5 Department of Dermatology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.

6 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The Medical School, University of Malta, Msida, Malta.

7 Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.

8 Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

9 Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.

10 Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Universitätsklinik Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

11 Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

12 Department of Ophthalmology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

13 Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital Aintree NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.

14 Department of Ophthalmology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

15 Department of Neurology, Christian Doppler Medical Center, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.

16 Department of Viroscience, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

17 Department of Virology and Antiviral Therapy, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany.

Abstract

Herpes zoster (HZ, shingles) is a frequent medical condition which may severely impact the quality of life of affected patients. Different therapeutic approaches to treat acute HZ are available.

The aim of this European project was the elaboration of a consensus-based guideline on the management of patients who present with HZ, considering different patient populations and different localizations.

This interdisciplinary guideline aims at an improvement of the outcomes of the acute HZ management concerning disease duration, acute pain and quality of life of the affected patients and at a reduction in the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and other complications.

The guideline development followed a structured and pre-defined process, considering the quality criteria for guidelines development as suggested by the AGREE II instrument.

The steering group was responsible for the planning and the organization of the guideline development process (Division of Evidence-Based Medicine, dEBM).

The expert panel was nominated by virtue of clinical expertise and/or scientific experience and included experts from the fields of dermatology, virology/infectiology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology and anaesthesiology.

Recommendations for clinical practice were formally consented during the consensus conference, explicitly considering different relevant aspects.

The guideline was approved by the commissioning societies after an extensive internal and external review process. In this second part of the guideline, therapeutic interventions have been evaluated.

The expert panel formally consented recommendations for the treatment of patients with HZ (antiviral medication, pain management, local therapy), considering various clinical situations.

Users of the guideline must carefully check whether the recommendations are appropriate for the context of intended application.

In the setting of an international guideline, it is generally important to consider different national approaches and legal circumstances with regard to the regulatory approval, availability and reimbursement of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

PDF

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jdv.13957/epdf

 

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June 28, 2017 at 8:53 am

2016-11 European consensus – Guideline on the Management of H Zoster – guided by the EDF in cooperation with the EADV, Part 1: DIAGNOSIS

Authors

R.N. Werner, A.F. Nikkels, B. Marinović, M. Schäfer, M. Czarnecka-Operacz, A.M. Agius, Z. Bata-Csörgő, J. Breuer, G. Girolomoni, G.E. Gross, S. Langan, R. Lapid-Gortzak, T.H. Lesser, U. Pleyer, J. Sellner, G.M. Verjans, P. Wutzler, C. Dressler, R. Erdmann, S. Rosumeck, A. Nast

PDF

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jdv.13995/full

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jdv.13995/epdf

June 28, 2017 at 8:51 am

Risk Factors for Legionella longbeachae Legionnaires’ Disease, New Zealand

Emerging Infectious Diseases July 2017 V.23 N.7

Emma Kenagy1, Patricia C. Priest1Comments to Author , Claire M. Cameron, Debbie Smith, Pippa Scott, Vicki Cho, Peter Mitchell, and David R. Murdoch

Author affiliations: University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand (E. Kenagy, P. Scott, V. Cho, D.R. Murdoch); Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch (E. Kenagy, D. Smith, P. Mitchell); University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand (P. Priest, C.M. Cameron)

Legionella longbeachae, found in soil and compost-derived products, is a globally underdiagnosed cause of Legionnaires’ disease.

We conducted a case–control study of L. longbeachae Legionnaires’ disease in Canterbury, New Zealand. Case-patients were persons hospitalized with L. longbeachae pneumonia, and controls were persons randomly sampled from the electoral roll for the area served by the participating hospital.

Among 31 cases and 172 controls, risk factors for Legionnaires’ disease were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of smoking >10 years, and exposure to compost or potting mix.

Gardening behaviors associated with L. longbeachae disease included having unwashed hands near the face after exposure to or tipping and troweling compost or potting mix. Mask or glove use was not protective among persons exposed to compost-derived products.

Precautions against inhaling compost and attention to hand hygiene might effectively prevent L. longbeachae disease. Long-term smokers and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should be particularly careful….

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/7/pdfs/16-1429.pdf

June 28, 2017 at 7:49 am

Modelling the effects of global climate change on Chikungunya transmission in the 21st century

Scientific Reports 7, Article number: 3813 (2017)

Nils B. Tjaden, Jonathan E. Suk, Dominik Fischer, Stephanie M. Thomas, Carl Beierkuhnlein & Jan C. Semenza

The arrival and rapid spread of the mosquito-borne viral disease Chikungunya across the Americas is one of the most significant public health developments of recent years, preceding and mirroring the subsequent spread of Zika.

Globalization in trade and travel can lead to the importation of these viruses, but climatic conditions strongly affect the efficiency of transmission in local settings.

In order to direct preparedness for future outbreaks, it is necessary to anticipate global regions that could become suitable for Chikungunya transmission.

Here, we present global correlative niche models for autochthonous Chikungunya transmission. These models were used as the basis for projections under the representative concentration pathway (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5 climate change scenarios. In a further step, hazard maps, which account for population densities, were produced. The baseline models successfully delineate current areas of active Chikungunya transmission.

Projections under the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios suggest the likelihood of expansion of transmission-suitable areas in many parts of the world, including China, sub-Saharan Africa, South America, the United States and continental Europe.

The models presented here can be used to inform public health preparedness planning in a highly interconnected world…..

PDF

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-03566-3.pdf

June 28, 2017 at 7:48 am

Ongoing Transmission of Candida auris in Health Care Facilities – United States, June 2016-May 2017.

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. May 19, 2017 V.66 N.19 P.514-515

Notes from the Field

Tsay S, Welsh RM, Adams EH, Chow NA, Gade L, Berkow EL, Poirot E, Lutterloh E, Quinn M, Chaturvedi S, Kerins J, Black SR, Kemble SK, Barrett PM; MSD, Barton K, Shannon DJ, Bradley K, Lockhart SR, Litvintseva AP, Moulton-Meissner H, Shugart A, Kallen A, Vallabhaneni S, Chiller TM, Jackson BR.

In June 2016, CDC released a clinical alert about the emerging, and often multidrug-resistant, fungus Candida auris and later reported the first seven U.S. cases of infection through August 2016 (1).

Six of these cases occurred before the clinical alert and were retrospectively identified.

As of May 12, 2017, a total of 77 U.S. clinical cases of C. auris had been reported to CDC from seven states: New York (53 cases), New Jersey (16), Illinois (four), Indiana (one), Maryland (one), Massachusetts (one), and Oklahoma (one) (Figure). All of these cases were identified through cultures taken as part of routine patient care (clinical cases).

Screening of close contacts of these patients, primarily of patients on the same ward in health care facilities, identified an additional 45 patients with C. auris isolated from one or more body sites (screening cases), resulting in a total of 122 patients from whom C. auris has been isolated…..

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/pdfs/mm6619a7.pdf

June 28, 2017 at 5:53 am


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