Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

July 26, 2017 at 4:47 pm

MMWR Recomm Rep. 2002 Aug 9;51(RR-10):1-29.

O’Grady NP1, Alexander M, Dellinger EP, Gerberding JL, Heard SO, Maki DG, Masur H, McCormick RD, Mermel LA, Pearson ML, Raad II, Randolph A, Weinstein RA.

Author information

1 National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

These guidelines have been developed for practitioners who insert catheters and for persons responsible for surveillance and control of infections in hospital, outpatient, and home health-care settings.

This report was prepared by a working group comprising members from professional organizations representing the disciplines of critical care medicine, infectious diseases, health-care infection control, surgery anesthesiology interventional radiology pulmonary medicine, pediatric medicine, and nursing.

The working group was led by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA), Society for Healthcare Epidemiology ofAmerica (SHEA), Surgical Infection Society (SIS), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), American Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists (ASCCA), Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), Infusion Nurses Society (INS), Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (SCVIR), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and is intended to replace the Guideline for Prevention of Intravascular Device-Related Infections published in 1996 These guidelines are intended to provide evidence-based recommendations for preventing catheter-related infections.

Major areas of emphasis include

1) educating and training health-care providers who insert and maintain catheters;

2) using maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion;

3) using a 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis;

4) avoiding routine replacement of central venous catheters as a strategy to prevent infection; and

5) using antiseptic/antibiotic impregnated short-term central venous catheters if the rate of infection is high despite adherence to other strategies (i.e., education and training, maximal sterile barrier precautions, and 2% chlorhexidine for skin antisepsis).

These guidelines also identify performance indicators that can be used locally by health-care institutions or organizations to monitor their success in implementing these evidence-based recommendations.

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5110.pdf

ERRATUM

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5132.pdf

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Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos, Bacterias, Bacteriemias, CONSENSOS, Desinfection and Sterilization, Epidemiología, F.O.D, GUIDELINES, Health Care-Associated Infections, Infecciones cardio-vasculares, Infecciones nosocomiales, Metodos diagnosticos, REPORTS, Resistencia bacteriana, REVIEWS, Sepsis.

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