Staphylococcus aureus soft tissue infection may increase the risk of subsequent staphylococcal soft tissue infections

July 30, 2017 at 12:52 pm

International Journal of Infectious Diseases July 2017 V.60 N.7 P.44-48

Cindy Bouvet, Shpresa Gjoni, Besa Zenelaj, Benjamin A. Lipsky, Elif Hakko, Ilker Uçkay

Background

Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of soft tissue infections. It is unknown, however, if a patient who has had such an infection is at greater risk for future soft tissue infections with S. aureus.

Methods

We conducted an epidemiological survey of adult patients hospitalized in the only public hospital in Geneva for treatment (usually combined surgical and medical) of a soft tissue infection caused by S. aureus. By reviewing nursing and medical records from the emergency department and hospital wards, we assessed whether or not they developed any other soft tissue infections (excluding a recurrence) after or before the index one.

Results

Among 1023 index episodes of soft tissue infections, 670 (65%) were caused by S. aureus, of which 47 were caused by methicillin-resistant strains (30 healthcare-associated and 17 community-acquired). The patients’ median age was 51 years and 334 (34%) were immune-compromised. The median time span between the patient’s first and last consultation (for any reason) in our hospital was 21.4 years (interquartile range, 10-30 years). In addition to their index infection, 124 patients (12%) developed a new nosocomial or community-acquired soft tissue infection. Among the index cases with an S. aureus infection, 92 (14%) had another soft tissue infection, compared to 32 (9%) who had a non-staphylococcal index infection (Pearson-χ2-test; p = 0.03). Similarly, patients with an index S. aureus infection, compared to those with a non-S. aureus infection, had a higher rate of another soft tissue infection caused by S. aureus (χ2-test; p < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, an index infection due to S. aureus shows a high association to further S. aureus soft tissue infections (logistic regression; odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.4-4.6).

Conclusion

Among adult patients hospitalised for a soft tissue infection, those infected with S. aureus (compared with other pathogens) may be at higher risk of a subsequent soft tissue infection, particularly with S. aureus.

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30138-8/pdf

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Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos, Bacterias, Bacteriemias, Epidemiología, Infecciones en piel y tej blandos, Metodos diagnosticos, REPORTS, Resistencia bacteriana, Sepsis, Update.

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