Editor’s Choice: Hepatitis C Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis in the Healthcare Worker: Why Direct-Acting Antivirals Don’t Change a Thing

August 19, 2017 at 10:30 am

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 1, 2017 V.64 N.1 P.92-99

Susanna Naggie, David P. Holland, Mark S. Sulkowski, and David L. Thomas

1Duke Clinical Research Institute

2Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

3Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

4Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Currently, 380 000–400 000 occupational exposures to blood-borne pathogens occur annually in the United States. The management for occupational HIV or hepatitis B virus exposures includes postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) when necessary; however, PEP is not recommended for hepatitis C virus (HCV) exposures.

Recent approval of HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has renewed discussions as to whether these therapies could be used to prevent infection after exposure. There are no published studies addressing this question, but the prescribing of DAAs for PEP has been reported.

We will discuss the differences in transmission of the 3 most common blood-borne pathogens, the natural history of early HCV infection, and the scientific rationale for PEP.

In particular, we will discuss how the low feasibility of conducting an adequately powered clinical trial of DAA use for PEP and the low cost-effectiveness of such an intervention is not supportive of targeting limited resources for such use.

PDF

https://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/1/92.full.pdf+html

 

 

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 1, 2017 V.64 N.1 P.100-101

Editor’s Choice: Editorial Commentary: Decision Science at Work: The Case of Hepatitis C Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis

Joshua A. Barocas and Benjamin P. Linas

1Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital

2Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health

3Boston Medical Center, Massachusetts

In this issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Naggie et al discuss clinical decision making and present the results of a decision analysis examining the cost of hepatitis C virus (HCV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) among healthcare workers who experience a needlestick exposure to HCV-positive body fluids.

The authors discuss that, in an era when we can cure essentially all HCV infections, there are only 3 motivations for PEP. First, it may make sense to use PEP to prevent infections if doing so would decrease HCV transmission during the period of active HCV viremia. The paper succinctly reviews the evidence and quickly makes clear that among healthcare workers in the United States with a known HCV exposure, basic universal precautions reduce the risk of forward transmission to essentially zero.

A second motivation might be cost. Given that HCV medications are expensive, a shorter course PEP may be cost saving compared with full treatment for HCV infection. To address the possible economic rationale for PEP, the authors developed a decision tree to estimate the costs of PEP for HCV in a hypothetical cohort of 100 healthcare workers who had suffered a needlestick injury. They used the model to compare the outcomes with PEP to those with a strategy of “no PEP and treat only patients who develop chronic HCV infection.”

A few notable assumptions were made—namely, that PEP was 100% effective at preventing infection, while treatment for chronic HCV was only 98% effective with the first line of therapy. In addition, individuals who failed first-line treatment for chronic HCV infection were retreated with 100% . . .

PDF

https://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/1/100.full.pdf+html

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Entry filed under: Antivirales no HIV, Epidemiología, Health Care-Associated Infections, Hepatitis C, Infecciones nosocomiales, Infecciones virales, Metodos diagnosticos, REPORTS.

Editor’s Choice: Coinfection With Zika and Dengue-2 Viruses in a Traveler Returning From Haiti, 2016: Clinical Presentation and Genetic Analysis Review – Role of cephalosporins in the era of Clostridium difficile infection


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