Archive for January 24, 2018

The Utility of Multiplex Molecular Tests for Enteric Pathogens: a Micro-Comic Strip

Journal of Clinical Microbiology February 2018 V.56 N.2

Editorial

Alexander J. McAdam

aDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

There are several FDA-approved multiplex molecular tests available for detection of enteric pathogens in stool (1–8).

These tests allow for rapid detection of a variety of enteric pathogens; however, it can be challenging for laboratory directors to decide what pathogens to report and whether to continue to perform other tests for pathogens included in these tests (9, 10).

How might laboratory directors approach implementation of these tests?

Read the comic strip to find out.

abstract

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e01916-17?etoc

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e01916-17.full.pdf+html

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January 24, 2018 at 3:58 pm

The Brief Case: Staphylococcus intermedius Group—Look What the Dog Dragged In

Journal of Clinical Microbiology February 2018 V.56 N.2

William Lainhart, Melanie L. Yarbrough and Carey-Ann D. Burnham

aDepartment of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

CASE

A 46-year-old man with a history of diabetes mellitus (type I), hypertension, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease presented to his primary care physician with a 3-week history of ulceration on his left, great toe.

The patient reported poor compliance with blood glucose level checks and insulin use. Upon examination, the physician noted a 1- by 1.5-cm ulcer on the underside of the patient’s toe.

The ulcer was debrided, and a specimen for microbiological culture was collected on a flocked swab.

As part of this routine work-up, the physician took a detailed history and noted that the patient lived alone with his two dogs….

abstract

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e00839-17?etoc

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e00839-17.full.pdf+html

 

 

Journal of Clinical Microbiology February 2018 V.56 N.2

Closing the Brief Case: Staphylococcus intermedius Group—Look What the Dog Dragged In

William Lainhart, Melanie L. Yarbrough and Carey-Ann D. Burnham

aDepartment of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

ANSWERS TO SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

Which biochemical test can be helpful as a screen to differentiate SIG species from Staphylococcus aureus?

A-Catalase

B-Pyrrolidonyl arylamidase (PYR)

C-Coagulase

D-Ornithine decarboxylase ….

abstract

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e00840-17?etoc

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e00840-17.full.pdf+html

 

January 24, 2018 at 3:57 pm

Development and Validation of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Candida auris from Surveillance Samples

Journal of Clinical Microbiology February 2018 V.56 N.2

Leach, Y. Zhu and S. Chaturvedi

aMycology Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA

bDepartment of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, Albany, New York, USA

Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant yeast causing invasive health care-associated infection with high mortality worldwide.

Rapid identification of C. auris is of primary importance for the implementation of public health measures to control the spread of infection.

To achieve these goals, we developed and validated a TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay targeting the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of the ribosomal gene.

The assay was highly specific, reproducible, and sensitive, with the detection limit of 1 C. auris CFU/PCR.

The performance of the C. auris real-time PCR assay was evaluated by using 623 surveillance samples, including 365 patient swabs and 258 environmental sponges.

Real-time PCR yielded positive results from 49 swab and 58 sponge samples, with 89% and 100% clinical sensitivity with regard to their respective culture-positive results.

The real-time PCR also detected C. auris DNA from 1% and 12% of swab and sponge samples with culture-negative results, indicating the presence of dead or culture-impaired C. auris.

The real-time PCR yielded results within 4 h of sample processing, compared to 4 to 14 days for culture, reducing turnaround time significantly.

The new real-time PCR assay allows for accurate and rapid screening of C. auris and can increase effective control and prevention of this emerging multidrug-resistant fungal pathogen in health care facilities.

abstract

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e01223-17.abstract?etoc

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/2/e01223-17.full.pdf+html

January 24, 2018 at 3:55 pm


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