Longitudinal Assessment of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in Newly Admitted Nursing Facility Patients: Implications for an Evolving Population

September 2, 2018 at 5:39 pm

Clinical Infectious Diseases September 15, 2018 V.67 N.6 P.837–844

Lona Mody; Betsy Foxman; Suzanne Bradley; Sara McNamara; Bonnie Lansing …

We sampled 651 recently admitted nursing facility patients and collected clinical and microbiological data over 1629 visits. We found that more than 57% were colonized with 1 or more multidrug-resistant organisms on enrollment, and 56% were colonized at discharge from the facility.

Background

The spread of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) is a global concern, and much about transmission in healthcare systems remains unknown. To reduce hospital stays, nursing facilities (NFs) have increasingly assumed care of post–acute populations. We estimate the prevalence of MDRO colonization in NF patients on enrollment and discharge to community settings, risk factors for colonization, and rates of acquiring MDROs during the stay.

Methods

We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of newly admitted patients in 6 NFs in southeast Michigan using active microbial surveillance of multiple anatomic sites sampled at enrollment, days 14 and 30, and monthly thereafter for up to 6 months.

Results

We enrolled 651 patients and collected 7526 samples over 1629 visits, with an average of 29 days of follow-up per participant. Nearly all participants were admitted for post–acute care (95%). More than half (56.8%) were colonized with MDROs at enrollment: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 16.1%; vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), 33.2%; and resistant gram-negative bacilli (R-GNB), 32.0%. Risk factors for colonization at enrollment included prolonged hospitalization (>14 days), functional disability, antibiotic use, or device use. Rates per 1000 patient-days of acquiring a new MDRO were MRSA, 3.4; VRE, 8.2; and R-GNB, 13.6. MDRO colonization at discharge was similar to that at enrollment (56.4%): MRSA, 18.4%; VRE, 30.3%; and R-GNB, 33.6%.

Conclusions

Short-stay NF patients exhibit a high prevalence of MDROs near the time of admission, as well as at discharge, and may serve as a reservoir for spread in other healthcare settings. Future interventions to reduce MDROs should specifically target this population.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/67/6/837/4965240

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Bacterias, Epidemiología, Health Care-Associated Infections, Infecciones emergentes, Infecciones nosocomiales, Metodos diagnosticos, Prevencion y Control de Infecciones, REPORTS, Resistencia bacteriana, Update.

A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2018 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society for Microbiology How Reliable Is the Alpha-defensin Immunoassay Test for Diagnosing Periprosthetic Joint Infection? A Prospective Study.


Calendar

September 2018
M T W T F S S
« Aug   Oct »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Most Recent Posts


%d bloggers like this: