Still fighting prosthetic joint infection after knee replacement

May 24, 2019 at 7:39 am

LANCET Infectous Diseases June 2019 V.19 N.6

COMMENT – Still fighting prosthetic joint infection after knee replacement

We congratulate Erik Lenguerrand and colleagues on the publication of their paper in The Lancet Infectious Diseases1 and respect that it is a well-conducted study. In their large-scale observational study, the authors collected data from the UK National Joint Registry including a total of 679 010 primary knee arthroplasty cases and evaluated associations between patient, surgical, and healthcare system factors and the risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest cohort study to date analysing the risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection following primary total knee replacement…

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(19)30067-2/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

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https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2819%2930067-2

 

 

LANCET Infectous Diseases June 2019 V.19 N.6

Risk factors associated with revision for prosthetic joint infection following knee replacement: an observational cohort study from England and Wales

Background

Prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication of knee replacement. The risk of developing a prosthetic joint infection is affected by patient, surgical, and health-care system factors. Existing evidence is limited by heterogeneity in populations studied, short follow-up, inadequate power, and does not differentiate early prosthetic joint infection, most likely related to the intervention, from late infection, more likely to occur due to haematogenous bacterial spread. We aimed to assess the overall and time-specific associations of these factors with the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection following primary knee replacement.

Methods

In this cohort study, we analysed primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales and the procedures subsequently revised for prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014. Data were obtained from the National Joint Registry linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics data in England and the Patient Episode Database for Wales. Each primary replacement was followed for a minimum of 12 months until the end of the observation period (Dec 31, 2014) or until the date of revision for prosthetic joint infection, revision for another indication, or death (whichever occurred first). We analysed the data using Poisson and piecewise exponential multilevel models to assess the associations between patient, surgical, and health-care system factors and risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection.

Findings

Of 679 010 primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales, 3659 were subsequently revised for an indication of prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014, after a median follow-up of 4·6 years (IQR 2·6–6·9). Male sex (rate ratio [RR] for male vs female patients 1·8 [95% CI 1·7–2·0]), younger age (RR for age ≥80 years vs <60 years 0·5 [0·4–0·6]), higher American Society of Anaesthesiologists [ASA] grade (RR for ASA grade 3–5 vs 1, 1·8 [1·6–2·1]), elevated body-mass index (BMI; RR for BMI ≥30 kg/m2 vs <25 kg/m2 1·5 [1·3–1·6]), chronic pulmonary disease (RR 1·2 [1·1–1·3]), diabetes (RR 1·4 [1·2–1·5]), liver disease (RR 2·2 [1·6–2·9]), connective tissue and rheumatic diseases (RR 1·5 [1·3–1·7]), peripheral vascular disease (RR 1·4 [1·1–1·7]), surgery for trauma (RR 1·9 [1·4–2·6]), previous septic arthritis (RR 4·9 [2·7–7·6]) or inflammatory arthropathy (RR 1·4 [1·2–1·7]), operation under general anaesthesia (RR 1·1 [1·0–1·2]), requirement for tibial bone graft (RR 2·0 [1·3–2·7]), use of posterior stabilised fixed bearing prostheses (RR for posterior stabilised fixed bearing prostheses vs unconstrained fixed bearing prostheses 1·4 [1·3–1·5]) or constrained condylar prostheses (3·5 [2·5–4·7]) were associated with a higher risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. However, uncemented total, patellofemoral, or unicondylar knee replacement (RR for uncemented vs cemented total knee replacement 0·7 [95% CI 0·6–0·8], RR for patellofemoral vs cemented total knee replacement 0·3 [0·2–0·5], and RR for unicondylar vs cemented total knee replacement 0·5 [0·5–0·6]) were associated with lower risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. Most of these factors had time-specific effects, depending on the time period post-surgery.

Interpretation

We have identified several risk factors for revision for prosthetic joint infection following knee replacement. Some of these factors are modifiable, and the use of targeted interventions or strategies could lead to a reduced risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. Non-modifiable factors and the time-specific nature of the effects we have observed will allow clinicians to appropriately counsel patients preoperatively and tailor follow-up regimens.

Funding

National Institute for Health Research.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(18)30755- 2/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2818%2930755-2

Entry filed under: Antimicrobianos, Bacterias, BIOFILM - BIOPELICULAS, Biología Molecular, BIOMARCADORES, Desinfection and Sterilization, Epidemiología, FIEBRE en el POSTOPERATORIO, Health Care-Associated Infections, Infecciones en piel y tej blandos, Infecciones nosocomiales, Infecciones sitio quirurgico, Metodos diagnosticos, Prevencion y Control de Infecciones, Profilaxis Antibiótica en Cirugía - PAC, REPORTS, Resistencia bacteriana, Sepsis, Update.

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