Detection of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses in Air Sampled From a University Campus: A Longitudinal Study

March 24, 2020 at 8:45 pm

Clinical Infectious Diseases March 2020 V.70 N.5 P.850–858

Background

Respiratory virus–laden particles are commonly detected in the exhaled breath of symptomatic patients or in air sampled from healthcare settings. However, the temporal relationship of detecting virus-laden particles at nonhealthcare locations vs surveillance data obtained by conventional means has not been fully assessed.

Methods

From October 2016 to June 2018, air was sampled weekly from a university campus in Hong Kong. Viral genomes were detected and quantified by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression models were fitted to examine the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of ecological and environmental factors associated with the detection of virus-laden airborne particles.

Results

Influenza A (16.9% [117/694]) and influenza B (4.5% [31/694]) viruses were detected at higher frequencies in air than rhinovirus (2.2% [6/270]), respiratory syncytial virus (0.4% [1/270]), or human coronaviruses (0% [0/270]). Multivariate analyses showed that increased crowdedness (aOR, 2.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.5–3.8]; P < .001) and higher indoor temperature (aOR, 1.2 [95% CI, 1.1–1.3]; P < .001) were associated with detection of influenza airborne particles, but absolute humidity was not (aOR, 0.9 [95% CI, .7–1.1]; P = .213). Higher copies of influenza viral genome were detected from airborne particles >4 μm in spring and <1 μm in autumn. Influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B viruses that caused epidemics during the study period were detected in air prior to observing increased influenza activities in the community.

Conclusions

Air sampling as a surveillance tool for monitoring influenza activity at public locations may provide early detection signals on influenza viruses that circulate in the community.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/70/5/850/5432328

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

Entry filed under: Antivirales no HIV, Biología Molecular, Epidemiología, Infecciones respiratorias, Infecciones virales, Influenza, Inmunizaciones, Metodos diagnosticos, REPORTS.

Severe Illnesses Associated With Outbreaks of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza in Adults REVIEW ARTICLE – PCT to Distinguish Viral From Bacterial Pneumonia – Systematic Review and Meta-analysis 


Calendar

March 2020
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Most Recent Posts


%d bloggers like this: