Posts filed under ‘Antimicoticos’

Radiological characteristics of pulmonary cryptococcosis in HIV-infected patients.

PLoS One. March 16, 2017 V.12 N.3 P.:e0173858.

Hu Z1, Chen J2, Wang J3, Xiong Q1, Zhong Y1, Yang Y1, Xu C4, Wei H1.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated pulmonary cryptococcosis (PC) is largely based on studies performed about 2 decades ago which reported that the most common findings on chest radiograph were diffuse interstitial infiltrates. Few studies are available regarding the computed tomography (CT) findings. The aim of this study was to characterize chest CT features of HIV-associated PC.

METHODS:

HIV patients with cryptococccal infection and pulmonary abnormalities on Chest CT between September 2010 and May 2016 in the Second Affiliated Hospital of the Southeast University were retrospectively analyzed. Confirmed cases of tumors, mycobacterial infections and other fungal infections were excluded from the analysis.

RESULTS:

60 cases were identified. The median CD4 T-cell counts were 20 cells/μL (range, 0-205 cells/μL). Chest CT scans demonstrated nodular lesions in 93.3% of the studied patients. Those nodular lesions were usually cavitated and solitary nodule was the most common form. Pleural effusions and pneumonic infiltrates occurred in 11.6% and 31.7% of the cases respectively. Those lesions were usually had co-existing nodular lesions. Etiological analysis suggested that 76.8% of the nodular lesions could have a relationship with PC that 12.5% of the nodular lesions were “laboratory-confirmed” cases, 48.2% were “clinically confirmed” cases and 16.1% were “clinically probable” cases. 85.7% of the pleural effusions could be “clinically confirmed” cases of PC. At least, 38.5% of the diffuse pneumonic infiltrates may be clinically attributed to pneumocystis pneumonia.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggested that pulmonary nodules but not diffuse pneumonia are the most common radiological characteristics of HIV-associated PC. HIV-infected patients with pulmonary nodules on Chest CT should particularly be screened for cryptococcal infection

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5354418/pdf/pone.0173858.pdf

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November 25, 2018 at 9:40 am

Pulmonary Cryptococcosis – Localized and Disseminated Infections in 27 Patients with AIDS.

Clinical Infectious Diseases September 1995 V.21 N.3 P.628–633

Marie-Caroline Meyohas; Patricia Roux; Diane Bollens; Christos Chouaid; Willy Rozenbaum …

We reviewed the records of 85 patients infected with both human immunodeficiency virus and Cryptococcus neoformans.

Twenty-seven patients (32%) had pulmonary cryptococcosis.

C. neoformans was cultured from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or pleural fluid in 25 cases; the remaining two patients had cryptococcal antigen (CA) detected in BAL fluid and C. neoformans cultured from other sites.

All but one of the 27 patients had detectable CA in serum.

The CD4+ lymphocyte count was low in all cases (median, 24/mm3). Clinical manifestations of pulmonary cryptococcosis included fever (94%), cough (71%), dyspnea (7%), expectoration (4%), chest pain (2%), and hemoptysis (1%).

Diffuse interstitial opacities (70.5%), focal interstitial abnormalities, alveolar opacities, adenopathies, cavitary lesions, and pleural effusions were evident.

Outcome was poor (mean survival time, 23 weeks) despite treatment.

Patients with localized pulmonary cryptococcosis appeared to have a higher CD4+ lymphocyte count, an earlier diagnosis, lower serum CA titers, fewer previous or concomitant infections, and a better prognosis than patients with disseminated cryptococcosis.

abstract

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-abstract/21/3/628/362645?redirectedFrom=fulltext

PDF

https://doi.org/10.1093/clinids/21.3.628

 

November 24, 2018 at 8:03 pm

Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection in HIV-1-Infected Patients

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome May 1990 V.3  N.5 P.480-484

Clark, Rebecca A.; Greer, Donald L.; Valainis, Gregory T…..

Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a frequent pathogen in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1).

We review the initial presentation and clinical course of 18 HIV-1-infected (HIV +) patients with a Cn pulmonary infection. Simultaneous positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures were found in 10 (63%) of 16 examined.

The most frequent presenting symptoms were fever (87%) and pulmonary complaints (60%).

Although the most common chest radiographic finding was bilateral diffuse interstitial infiltrates, nodules and cavitary lesions were also seen. Nine (50%) of the 18 patients died within 6 weeks of diagnosis.

Of six patients with an isolated Cn pulmonary infection, five have subsequently died.

Three of these five patients did not receive maintenance therapy and had confirmed or probable relapse.

Patients initially presenting with an isolated Cn pulmonary infection may later show disseminated disease, suggesting that such patients should receive both acute and maintenance therapy.

abstract

https://journals.lww.com/jaids/Abstract/1990/05000/Cryptococcus_neoformans_Pulmonary_Infection_in.3.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

November 24, 2018 at 8:01 pm

2017 GUIA ARGENTINA PARA USO de ANTIBIOTICOS en el 1er Nivel Asistencial – MSN 181 pags.

Guía de medicamentos esenciales para el PNA – Antimicrobianos 1ra edición – Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires : Ministerio de Salud de la Nación. Cobertura Universal de Salud. Medicamentos, 2017

“Guía de Medicamentos Esenciales en el PNA – Grupo Antimicrobianos” describe las características farmacológicas y clínicas más relevantes de los Medicamentos Esenciales utilizados en el manejo de las enfermedades infecciosas prevalentes en el primer nivel de atención.

La misma se agrupa a su vez en: antibióticos, antimicóticos, antivirales, antiparasitarios y fármacos para el tratamiento de la Tuberculosis.

PDF

http://www.msal.gob.ar/images/stories/bes/graficos/0000001087cnt-medicamentos-esenciales-primer-nivel-atencion-antimicrobianos.pdf

November 3, 2018 at 5:44 pm

Periprosthetic fungal infection of a hip caused by Trichosporon inkin.

Arthroplast Today. July 28, 2017 V.4 N.1 P.24-26.

Burgo FJ1, Mengelle DE1, Abraham A1, Kremer G1, Autorino CM1.

Author information

1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Austral University Hospital, Adult Reconstruction Section, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

An immunocompromised patient with a history of multiple hip implant revisions extended courses of empiric antibiotic treatment, and a retained metallic rod in the femoral medullary canal was transferred for diagnostic studies and treatment. A high suspicion of fungal infection and utilization of extended and specific fungal cultures were the diagnostic keys for infection with Trichosporon inkin. The treatment consisted in a debridement surgery with the use of a functional spacer with cement supplemented with voriconazole and vancomycin plus a 6-month systemic treatment with voriconazole. After 2 years of follow-up, the patient is free of symptoms.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859464/pdf/main.pdf

August 28, 2018 at 11:58 am

First report of sporadic cases of Candida auris in Colombia

International Journal of Infectious Diseases April 2018 V.69 P.63-67

Claudia M. Parra-Giraldo, Sandra L. Valderrama, Gloria Cortes-Fraile, Javier R. Garzón, Beatriz E. Ariza, Florent Morio, Melva Y. Linares-Linares, Andrés Ceballos-Garzón, Alejandro de la Hoz, Catalina Hernandez, Carlos Alvarez-Moreno, Patrice Le Pape

  • El hongo emergente Candida auris es una amenaza global seria. A menudo es resistente a múltiples fármacos, es un problema de salud pública.
  • La levadura Candida auris es difícil de identificar con herramientas de laboratorio estándar, y puede identificarse erróneamente en laboratorios sin tecnología específica.
  • Candida auris se ha diseminado rápidamente y ha causado infecciones en más de una docena de países, este es el primer caso reportado con Candida auris en Colombia.

Background

Candida auris is a recently reported Candida species that is phenotypically similar to Candida haemulonii and related to hospital outbreaks. This organism can be misidentified as Candida haemulonii, Candida famata, Candida catenulata, or Rhodotorula glutinis by phenotypic approaches. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and DNA sequence analysis using internal transcribed spacer rDNA bar-coding provide an accurate identification.

Case reports

Three cases of C. auris infection in patients with risk factors for fungal infection (one admitted to the intensive care unit, one with lymphoma, and one with HIV; all three with previous antibiotic use) are reported; these infections were not epidemiologically related. Yeast isolates were recovered from blood, ocular secretion, and bronchoalveolar lavage and were misidentified as C. catenulata and Candida albicans by the phenotypic MicroScan method. The isolates were confirmed to be C. auris by means of MALDI-TOF MS and DNA sequence analysis. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed on these C. auris isolates, which exhibited high minimum inhibitory concentrations to triazoles and amphotericin B. One patient survived and the other two died. Only one of these deaths was related to fungemia.

Conclusions

C auris is an emerging and opportunistic multidrug-resistant human pathogen. It is necessary to strengthen measures to achieve an accurate and quick identification and also to avoid its dissemination. This will require improvements in health and infection control measures, as well as the promotion of antifungal stewardship in healthcare facilities.

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(18)30035-3/pdf

July 14, 2018 at 7:05 pm

Pharmacokinetics of anidulafungin in critically ill patients with candidemia/invasive candidiasis.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2013 Apr;57(4):1672-6.

Liu P1, Ruhnke M, Meersseman W, Paiva JA, Kantecki M, Damle B.

Author information

1 Clinical Pharmacology, Specialty Care, Pfizer Inc, Groton, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

The pharmacokinetics of intravenous anidulafungin in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients were assessed in this study and compared with historical data from a general patient population and healthy subjects. Intensive plasma sampling was performed over a dosing interval at steady state from 21 ICU patients with candidemia/invasive candidiasis. All patients received the recommended dosing regimen (a 200-mg loading dose on day 1, followed by a daily 100-mg maintenance dose), except for a 54-year-old 240-kg female patient (who received a daily 150-mg maintenance dose instead). Plasma samples were assayed for anidulafungin using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters in ICU patients were calculated by a noncompartmental method. With the exclusion of the 240-kg patient, the median (minimum, maximum) age, weight, and body mass index (BMI) of 20 ICU patients were 57 (39, 78) years, 65 (48, 106) kg, and 23.3 (16.2, 33.8) kg/m(2), respectively. The average anidulafungin area under the curve over the 24-hour dosing interval (AUC(0-24)), maximum concentration (C(max)), and clearance (CL) in 20 ICU patients were 92.7 mg · h/liter, 7.7 mg/liter, and 1.3 liters/h, respectively. The exposure in the 240-kg patient at a daily 150-mg dose was within the range observed in ICU patients overall. The average AUC(0-24) and Cmax in the general patient population and healthy subjects were 110.3 and 105.9 mg · h/liter and 7.2 and 7.0 mg/liter, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of anidulafungin in ICU patients appeared to be comparable to those in the general patient population and healthy subjects at the same dosing regimen.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3623353/pdf/zac1672.pdf

July 7, 2018 at 3:36 pm

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