Posts filed under ‘Antimicrobianos’

JAMA Surgery May 3, 2017

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guideline for the prevention of surgical site infection, 2017

Berríos-Torres SI et al.

Importance 

The human and financial costs of treating surgical site infections (SSIs) are increasing. The number of surgical procedures performed in the United States continues to rise, and surgical patients are initially seen with increasingly complex comorbidities. It is estimated that approximately half of SSIs are deemed preventable using evidence-based strategies.

Objective 

To provide new and updated evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of SSI.

Evidence Review 

A targeted systematic review of the literature was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from 1998 through April 2014. A modified Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to assess the quality of evidence and the strength of the resulting recommendation and to provide explicit links between them. Of 5487 potentially relevant studies identified in literature searches, 5759 titles and abstracts were screened, and 896 underwent full-text review by 2 independent reviewers. After exclusions, 170 studies were extracted into evidence, evaluated, and categorized.

Findings 

Before surgery, patients should shower or bathe (full body) with soap (antimicrobial or nonantimicrobial) or an antiseptic agent on at least the night before the operative day. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered only when indicated based on published clinical practice guidelines and timed such that a bactericidal concentration of the agents is established in the serum and tissues when the incision is made. In cesarean section procedures, antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered before skin incision. Skin preparation in the operating room should be performed using an alcohol-based agent unless contraindicated. For clean and clean-contaminated procedures, additional prophylactic antimicrobial agent doses should not be administered after the surgical incision is closed in the operating room, even in the presence of a drain. Topical antimicrobial agents should not be applied to the surgical incision. During surgery, glycemic control should be implemented using blood glucose target levels less than 200 mg/dL, and normothermia should be maintained in all patients. Increased fraction of inspired oxygen should be administered during surgery and after extubation in the immediate postoperative period for patients with normal pulmonary function undergoing general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Transfusion of blood products should not be withheld from surgical patients as a means to prevent SSI.

Conclusions and Relevance

This guideline is intended to provide new and updated evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of SSI and should be incorporated into comprehensive surgical quality improvement programs to improve patient safety.

 

FULL TEXT

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamasurgery/fullarticle/2623725

PDF (CLIC en “DOWNLOAD PDF”)

May 27, 2017 at 10:42 am

Decolonization in Prevention of Health Care-Associated Infections.

Clin Microbiol Rev. April 2016 V.29 N.2 P.201-22.

Septimus EJ1, Schweizer ML2.

Author information

1 Hospital Corporation of America, Nashville, Tennessee, USA Texas A&M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA Edward.septimus@hcahealthcare.com.

2 University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, USA Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, Iowa, USA University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.

Abstract

Colonization with health care-associated pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Gram-negative organisms, and Clostridium difficile is associated with increased risk of infection.

Decolonization is an evidence-based intervention that can be used to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs).

This review evaluates agents used for nasal topical decolonization, topical (e.g., skin) decolonization, oral decolonization, and selective digestive or oropharyngeal decontamination. Although the majority of studies performed to date have focused on S. aureus decolonization, there is increasing interest in how to apply decolonization strategies to reduce infections due to Gram-negative organisms, especially those that are multidrug resistant.

Nasal topical decolonization agents reviewed include mupirocin, bacitracin, retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, photodynamic therapy, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin.

Mupirocin is still the gold standard agent for S. aureus nasal decolonization, but there is concern about mupirocin resistance, and alternative agents are needed. Of the other nasal decolonization agents, large clinical trials are still needed to evaluate the effectiveness of retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin.

Given inferior outcomes and increased risk of allergic dermatitis, the use of bacitracin-containing compounds cannot be recommended as a decolonization strategy.

Topical decolonization agents reviewed included chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), hexachlorophane, povidone-iodine, triclosan, and sodium hypochlorite. Of these, CHG is the skin decolonization agent that has the strongest evidence base, and sodium hypochlorite can also be recommended. CHG is associated with prevention of infections due to Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms as well as Candida.

Conversely, triclosan use is discouraged, and topical decolonization with hexachlorophane and povidone-iodine cannot be recommended at this time.

There is also evidence to support use of selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination, but additional studies are needed to assess resistance to these agents, especially selection for resistance among Gram-negative organisms.

The strongest evidence for decolonization is for use among surgical patients as a strategy to prevent surgical site infections.

PDF

http://cmr.asm.org/content/29/2/201.full.pdf+html

May 12, 2017 at 7:45 am

Early, Goal-Directed Therapy for Septic Shock — A Patient-Level Meta-Analysis

N Engl J Med  Mar 21, 2017

The PRISM Investigators*

BACKGROUND

After a single-center trial and observational studies suggesting that early, goal-directed therapy (EGDT) reduced mortality from septic shock, three multicenter trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe) showed no benefit. This meta-analysis of individual patient data from the three recent trials was designed prospectively to improve statistical power and explore heterogeneity of treatment effect of EGDT.

METHODS

We harmonized entry criteria, intervention protocols, outcomes, resource-use measures, and data collection across the trials and specified all analyses before unblinding. After completion of the trials, we pooled data, excluding the protocol-based standard-therapy group from the ProCESS trial, and resolved residual differences. The primary outcome was 90-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included 1-year survival, organ support, and hospitalization costs. We tested for treatment-by-subgroup interactions for 16 patient characteristics and 6 care-delivery characteristics.

RESULTS

We studied 3723 patients at 138 hospitals in seven countries. Mortality at 90 days was similar for EGDT (462 of 1852 patients [24.9%]) and usual care (475 of 1871 patients [25.4%]); the adjusted odds ratio was 0.97 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.14; P=0.68). EGDT was associated with greater mean (±SD) use of intensive care (5.3±7.1 vs. 4.9±7.0 days, P=0.04) and cardiovascular support (1.9±3.7 vs. 1.6±2.9 days, P=0.01) than was usual care; other outcomes did not differ significantly, although average costs were higher with EGDT. Subgroup analyses showed no benefit from EGDT for patients with worse shock (higher serum lactate level, combined hypotension and hyperlactatemia, or higher predicted risk of death) or for hospitals with a lower propensity to use vasopressors or fluids during usual resuscitation.

CONCLUSIONS

In this meta-analysis of individual patient data, EGDT did not result in better outcomes than usual care and was associated with higher hospitalization costs across a broad range of patient and hospital characteristics. (Funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and others; PRISM ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02030158.)

PDF

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa1701380

May 11, 2017 at 11:13 am

Eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage: a systematic review.

Clin Infect Dis. Apr 1, 2009 V.48 N.7 P.922-30.

Ammerlaan HS1, Kluytmans JA, Wertheim HF, Nouwen JL, Bonten MJ.

Author information

1 Department of Medical Microbiology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. H.Ammerlaan@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

A systematic review was performed to determine the effectiveness of different approaches for eradicating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Twenty-three clinical trials were selected that evaluated oral antibiotics (7 trials), topically applied antibiotics (12 trials), or both (4 trials). Because of clinical heterogeneity, quantitative analysis of all studies was deemed to be inappropriate, and exploratory subgroup analyses were performed for studies with similar study populations, methods, and targeted bacteria. The estimated pooled relative risk of treatment failure 1 week after short-term nasal mupirocin treatment, compared with placebo, was 0.10 (range, 0.07-0.14). There was low heterogeneity between study outcomes, and effects were similar for patients and healthy subjects, as well as in studies that included only methicillin-susceptible S. aureus carriers or both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriers. The development of drug resistance during treatment was reported in 1% and 9% of patients receiving mupirocin and oral antibiotics, respectively. Short-term nasal application of mupirocin is the most effective treatment for eradicating methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage, with an estimated success of rate of 90% 1 week after treatment and approximately 60% after a longer follow-up period.

PDF

https://oup.silverchair-cdn.com/oup/backfile/Content_public/Journal/cid/48/7/10.1086/597291/2/48-7-922.pdf?Expires=1494547126&Signature=C-3w0qidaoRa7nD1JLkVurTsGPMZt6nFPH~~ukmz~Wrdd2rLVyc4nFgZ5uT0RDQSwfwFtWB2QPZw8l7HjcKFHWaiSy8qEDU3uZM28k~O4MHJYjd~B86s2~s8-xP9j04r6TKdnJ2lsY3VZLXEb22vNGmERggjk4B2h7DUCAJGXBBba-7AixeOYEbLumFS8-5SmkCgBSKsKsa8UWzqmXJWZrQDlgMLMzqAUURfPITtO9AoiLUzDH~bVNd5zCozVmfpbxf3nAVk4cZVekXwNiAH3SYHOKfVd3YomfEzd5~tBxRwwqnxDp8kvCJtB1oFv9HNMf3Jy1GdMCnjNuyVrA1cQg__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAIUCZBIA4LVPAVW3Q

May 10, 2017 at 7:11 pm

“Utilización de penicilina benzatínica como tratamiento para la prevención de sífilis congénita en el primer nivel de atención de la salud.” 36 pags

Organización Panamericana de la Salud

Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

Dirección Provincial de Programas Sanitarios

Dirección HIV/SIDA/ITS

Este documento fue escrito por Mariana Ceriotto (Médica especialista en Infectología y Salud Pública. Diplomada en Gestión Pública. Experta en prevención, diagnóstico y tratamiento de las infecciones perinatales).

La revisión técnica fue realizada por: Marcelo Vila (Asesor Subregional para el Cono Sur- Unidad de VIH, hepatitis, TBC e ITS- OPS/OMS); Adriana Duran (Directora de Programas Sanitarios- Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Buenos Aires) y Mónica Moyano (Directora de VIH-ITS y Hepatitis virales- Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Buenos Aires).

Avalan este documento:

  • Asociación Argentina de Alergia e Inmunología Clínica (AAAeIC)
  • Sociedad Argentina de Infectología (SADI)
  • Sociedad de Ginecología Y Obstetricia de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (SOGBA)
  • Dirección de SIDA y ETS- Ministerio de Salud de la Nación

Esta publicación contó con apoyo financiero de la OPS/OMS.

Contenido

  1. La persistencia del problema de la sífilis congénita como problema de salud pública en Argentina y la región de las Américas
  2. El tratamiento de la embarazada con diagnóstico de sífilis
  3. Alergia a beta-lactámicos
  4. Uso de penicilina benzatínica en el primer nivel de atención
  5. Recomendaciones
  6. Cuestionario para la evaluación de los factores de riesgo
  7. Evaluación de los factores de riesgo de alergia a penicilina
  8. Protocolo de diagnóstico y tratamiento inicial de reacciones anafilácticas
  9. Referencias bibliográficas

 

PDF

http://www.paho.org/arg/images/gallery/PenicilinaFinal.pdf

May 10, 2017 at 7:59 am

Use of azithromycin and risk of ventricular arrhythmia

Canadian Medical Journal Association April 18, 2017 V.189 N.15

Gianluca Trifirò, Maria de Ridder, Janet Sultana, Alessandro Oteri, Peter Rijnbeek, Serena Pecchioli, Giampiero Mazzaglia, Irene Bezemer, Edeltraut Garbe, Tania Schink, Elisabetta Poluzzi, Trine Frøslev, Mariam Molokhia, Igor Diemberger, and Miriam C.J.M. Sturkenboom

BACKGROUND

There are conflicting findings from observational studies of the arrhythrogenic potential of azithromycin. Our aim was to quantify the association between azithromycin use and the risk of ventricular arrhythmia.

METHODS

We conducted a nested case–control study within a cohort of new antibiotic users identified from a network of 7 population-based health care databases in Denmark, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom for the period 1997–2010. Up to 100 controls per case were selected and matched by age, sex and database. Recency of antibiotic use and type of drug (azithromycin was the exposure of interest) at the index date (occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia) were identified. We estimated the odds of ventricular arrhythmia associated with current azithromycin use relative to current amoxicillin use or nonuse of antibiotics (≥ 365 d without antibiotic exposure) using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for confounders.

RESULTS

We identified 14 040 688 new antibiotic users who met the inclusion criteria. Ventricular arrhythmia developed in 12 874, of whom 30 were current azithromycin users. The mean age of the cases and controls was 63 years, and two-thirds were male. In the pooled data analyses across databases, azithromycin use was associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia relative to nonuse of antibiotics (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35–2.86). This increased risk disappeared when current amoxicillin use was the comparator (adjusted OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.48–1.71). Database-specific estimates and meta-analysis confirmed results from the pooled data analysis.

INTERPRETATION

Current azithromycin use was associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia when compared with nonuse of antibiotics, but not when compared with current amoxicillin use. The decreased risk with an active comparator suggests significant confounding by indication.

PDF

http://www.cmaj.ca/content/189/15/E560.full.pdf+html

May 9, 2017 at 3:34 pm

Corticosteroids in treating CAP – has the time really come.

Clinical Microbiology and Infection May 2017 V.23 N.5

Blot, A. Salmon-Rousseau, P. Chavanet, L. Piroth*

Departement d’Infectiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Dijon, France

Whether corticosteroids should be used in the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still a matter of debate.

This question is all the more relevant as pneumonia remains a leading cause of death worldwide.

Severe CAP is associated with an increase in pulmonary and circulatory cytokines, which may be associated with treatment failure, especially in bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia.

Thus corticosteroids, which suppress inflammatory reactions and prevent the migration of inflammatory cells to tissues, may be of particular interest in the treatment of such severe pneumonias …

PDF

http://www.clinicalmicrobiologyandinfection.com/article/S1198-743X(16)30388-3/pdf

May 9, 2017 at 8:25 am

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