Posts filed under ‘Bacterias’

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

Reumatol Clin. 2017 Mar 7. 

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Molina Collada J1, Rico Nieto A2, Díaz de Bustamante Ussia M3, Balsa Criado A4.

Author information

1 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: molinacolladajuan@gmail.com.

2 Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

3 Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

4 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

Abstract

We describe a case of septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum, gram-positive bacilli that are usually commensal organisms of skin and mucosal membranes, but are seldom implicated in native septic arthritis. An 84-year-old man with Corynebacterium striatum septic arthritis of his native left knee and no response to conventional antibiotic therapy. Thus, the patient was allowed to take dalbavancin for compassionate use, with an excellent clinical outcome. This case emphasizes de role of Corynebacterium striatum in native joint infections and highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate treatment in improving the clinical outcome.

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

http://www.reumatologiaclinica.org/es/linkresolver/artritis-septica-rodilla-nativa-por/S1699258X17300335/

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October 22, 2017 at 12:43 pm

Septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2014 May;52(5):1786-8.

Westblade LF1, Shams F, Duong S, Tariq O, Bulbin A, Klirsfeld D, Zhen W, Sakaria S, Ford BA, Burnham CA, Ginocchio CC.

Author information

1 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York, USA.

Abstract

We report a case of septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum, a rare and unusual cause of septic arthritis of native joints. The isolate was identified by a combination of phenotypic, mass spectrometric, and nucleic acid-based assays and exhibited high-level resistance to most antimicrobials.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3993712/pdf/zjm1786.pdf

October 22, 2017 at 12:41 pm

A spontaneous joint infection with Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Feb;45(2):656-8.

Scholle D1.

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, Legacy Emanuel and Good Samaritan Hospitals, 1015 NW 22nd Ave., Portland, OR 97210, USA. dscholle@fastmail.fm

Abstract

Corynebacterium striatum is a ubiquitous saprophyte with the potential to cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. Until now, spontaneous infection of a natural joint has not been reported. When phenotyping failed, gene sequencing was used to identify the species. The isolate demonstrated high-level resistance to most antibiotics.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1829050/pdf/0827-06.pdf

 

October 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm

The Added Cost of Rapid Diagnostic Testing and Active Antimicrobial Stewardship: Is It Worth It?

Journal of Clinical Microbiology January 2017 V.55 N.1 P.20-23

Erin McElvania TeKippe

Departments of Pathology and Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern and Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Health, Dallas, Texas, USA

Rapid diagnostic testing reduces the turnaround time for pathogen identification in the clinical microbiology laboratory, but the impact on patient care and hospital costs is a matter of speculation. Patel et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. 55:60–67, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01452-16) investigate the impact of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in conjunction with active antimicrobial stewardship to determine if implementation is indeed worth the added costs.

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/1/20.full.pdf+html

October 19, 2017 at 3:06 pm

The Brief Case: Bacteremia Caused by Helicobacter cinaedi

Journal of Clinical Microbiology January 2017 V.55 N.1 P.5-9

Allen C. Bateman and Susan M. Butler-Wu* Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

Carey-Ann D. Burnham, Editor Washington University School of Medicine

CASE

A 61-year-old male with relapsed multiple myeloma presented to clinic with fatigue and chills.

The patient had undergone two rounds of autologous stem cell transplantation in 2012 and was undergoing chemotherapy with pomalidomide, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone.

He was admitted for neutropenic fever (absolute neutrophil count of 1.4 × 109/liter, temperature of 38.4°C). His physical exam was normal, and he denied any other symptoms.

Two sets of blood cultures were obtained (VersaTREK Redox; Trek Diagnostic Systems), and the patient was started on levofloxacin, vancomycin, and cefepime. His fever subsided after 24 h, and he was discharged home to complete a 30-day course of oral levofloxacin…

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/1/5.full.pdf+html

October 19, 2017 at 3:04 pm

A Rose by Any Other Name: Practical Updates on Microbial Nomenclature for Clinical Microbiology

Journal of Clinical Microbiology January 2017 V.55 N.1 P.3-4

EDITORIAL

Colleen S. Kraft, Alexander J. McAdam, and Karen C. Carroll

aDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

bDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

cDivision of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

The clinical microbiology laboratory stands at the interface between basic science, including the study of phylogeny, and applications of science in the very practical world of medical care.

In this context, it is important that laboratory reports balance scientific accuracy with medical utility, and it is particularly difficult to do this in the naming of microorganisms.

New organisms are discovered and named, and our understanding of the relationships between known organisms improves, resulting in the reclassification and renaming of organisms as they are sorted into the correct groups.

In this issue of Journal of Clinical Microbiology, we are pleased to provide several minireviews that are intended to help clinical microbiologists keep up-to-date with changes in nomenclature for bacteria (1), parasites (2), viruses (3), and fungi (4).

Most of these minireviews focus on human pathogens, but the minireview on viruses includes those affecting nonhuman animals. An article about mycobacterial nomenclature is in preparation and will be published in Journal of Clinical Microbiology when available.

The idea for this informative resource was proposed by Dr. Karen Carroll at the editors’ meeting in 2015.

The editors enthusiastically agreed these reviews would be a useful resource for clinical microbiologists, infectious diseases physicians, laboratory technologists, pharmacists, and infection preventionists, in addition to fostering discussion and teaching of trainees and students.

Several editors volunteered to write the articles, and we plan to update these minireviews every 2 years if they prove to be as useful as we expect….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/1/3.full.pdf+html

October 19, 2017 at 3:02 pm

Antimicrobial Nonsusceptibility of Gram-Negative Bloodstream Isolates, Veterans Health Administration System, United States, 2003–2013

Emerging Infectious Diseases November 2017 V.23 N.11

Michihiko Goto, Jennifer S. McDanel, Makoto M. Jones, Daniel J. Livorsi, Michael E. Ohl, Brice F. Beck, Kelly K. Richardson, Bruce Alexander, and Eli N. Perencevich

Iowa City Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Iowa City, Iowa, USA (M. Goto, J.S. McDanel, D.J. Livorsi, M.E. Ohl, B.F. Beck, K.K. Richardson, B. Alexander, E.N. Perencevich); University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City (M. Goto, J.S. McDanel, D.J. Livorsi, M.E. Ohl, E.N. Perencevich); Salt Lake City Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA (M.M. Jones); University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City USA (M.M. Jones)

Bacteremia caused by gram-negative bacteria is associated with serious illness and death, and emergence of antimicrobial drug resistance in these bacteria is a major concern.

Using national microbiology and patient data for 2003–2013 from the US Veterans Health Administration, we characterized nonsusceptibility trends of community-acquired, community-onset; healthcare-associated, community-onset; and hospital-onset bacteremia for selected gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter spp.).

For 47,746 episodes of bacteremia, the incidence rate was 6.37 episodes/10,000 person-years for community-onset bacteremia and 4.53 episodes/10,000 patient-days for hospital-onset bacteremia.

For Klebsiella spp., P. aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter spp., we observed a decreasing proportion of nonsusceptibility across nearly all antimicrobial drug classes for patients with healthcare exposure; trends for community-acquired, community-onset isolates were stable or increasing.

The role of infection control and antimicrobial stewardship efforts in inpatient settings in the decrease in drug resistance rates for hospital-onset isolates needs to be determined.

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/11/pdfs/16-1214.pdf

October 18, 2017 at 8:25 am

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