Posts filed under ‘Bacteriemias’

Brotes por microorganismos resistentes relacionados con el turismo médico

Alerta Epidemiológica 16 de abril de 2019

Brotes por microorganismos resistentes relacionados con el turismo médico

Ante el incremento de brotes causados por microorganismos resistentes relacionados con el turismo médico, la Organización Panamericana de la Salud / Organización Mundial de la Salud (OPS/OMS) orienta a los Estados Miembros a fortalecer la capacidad de detección y manejo de infecciones ocasionadas por microorganismos resistentes en pacientes que viajaron para ser atendidos en un país diferente del que residen.

Al mismo tiempo, la OPS/OMS les urge a implementar medidas preventivas para reducir las infecciones asociadas con la atención de salud en todos los niveles del sistema de salud.

PDF

https://www.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_docman&view=download&category_slug=alertas-y-actualizaciones-epidemiologicas&alias=48279-16-de-abril-de-2019-alerta-epidemiologica-sobre-brotes-por-microorganismos-resistentes-asociados-con-el-turismo-medico-1&Itemid=270&lang=es

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April 22, 2019 at 8:51 am

Age-Dependent Increase in Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia, Denmark 2008-2015

Emerging Infectious Diseases May 2019 V.15 N.5

Age-Dependent Increase in Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia, Denmark, 2008–2015

Thorlacius-Ussing et al.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a major cause of illness and death worldwide.

We analyzed temporal trends of SAB incidence and death in Denmark during 2008–2015. SAB incidence increased 48%, from 20.76 to 30.37 per 100,000 person-years, during this period (p<0.001).

The largest change in incidence was observed for persons >80 years of age: a 90% increase in the SAB rate (p<0.001).

After adjusting for demographic changes, annual rates increased 4.0% (95% CI 3.0–5.0) for persons <80 years of age, 8.4% (95% CI 7.0–11.0) for persons 80–89 years of age, and 13.0% (95% CI 9.0–17.5) for persons >90 years of age.

The 30-day case-fatality rate remained stable at 24%; crude population death rates increased by 53% during 2008–2015 (p<0.001).

Specific causes and mechanisms for this rapid increase in SAB incidence among the elderly population remain to be clarified.

FULL TEXT

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/5/18-1733_article

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/5/pdfs/18-1733.pdf

April 22, 2019 at 8:50 am

Disseminated Gonococcal Infection

N Engl J of Medic April 18, 2019 V.380 P.1565

IMAGES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE

Florez-Pollack and M.M. Mauskar

A 20-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a rash involving the arms, legs, trunk, and scalp, which had erupted that morning. She also reported generalized muscle aches, fever, and pain in both ankles. Two weeks earlier …

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm1811120?query=TOC

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMicm1811120?articleTools

April 21, 2019 at 11:37 am

2017 WSES and SICG guidelines on acute calcolous cholecystitis in elderly population

World J Emerg Surg. 2019 Mar 4;14:10.

Pisano M, Ceresoli M, Cimbanassi S, Gurusamy K, Coccolini F, Borzellino G, et al

Background

Gallstone disease is very common afflicting 20 million people in the USA. In Europe, the overall incidence of gallstone disease is 18.8% in women and 9.5% in men. The frequency of gallstones related disease increases by age. The elderly population is increasing worldwide.

Aim

The present guidelines aims to report the results of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) and Italian Surgical Society for Elderly (SICG) consensus conference on acute calcolous cholecystitis (ACC) focused on elderly population.

Material and methods

The 2016 WSES guidelines on ACC were used as baseline; six questions have been used to investigate the particularities in elderly population; the answers have been developed in terms of differences compared to the general population and to statements of the 2016 WSES Guidelines. The Consensus Conference discusses, voted, and modified the statements. International experts contributed in the elaboration of final statements and evaluation of the level of scientific evidences.

Results

The quality of the studies available decreases when we approach ACC in elderly. Same admission laparoscopic cholecystectomy should be suggested for elderly people with ACC; frailty scores as well as clinical and surgical risk scores could be adopted but no general consensus exist. The role of cholecystostomy is uncertain.

Discussion and conclusions

The evaluation of pro and cons for surgery or for alternative treatments in elderly suffering of ACC is more complex than in young people; also, the oldest old age is not a contraindication for surgery; however, a larger use of frailty and surgical risk scores could contribute to reach the best clinical judgment by the surgeon. The present guidelines offer the opportunity to share with the scientific community a baseline for future researches and discussion.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399945/

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399945/pdf/13017_2019_Article_224.pdf

April 3, 2019 at 8:37 am

Microscopic Examination and Broth Culture of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Diagnosis of Meningitis

Journal of Clinical Microbiology June 1998 V.36 N.6 P.1617-1620

Dunbar SA et al

We reviewed the results of microscopic Gram stain examination and routine culture for 2,635 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples processed in an adult hospital microbiology laboratory during 55 months. There were 56 instances of bacterial or fungal meningitis (16 associated with central nervous system [CNS] shunt infection), four infections adjacent to the subarachnoid space, four cases of sepsis without meningitis, and an additional 220 CSF specimens with positive cultures in which the organism isolated was judged to be a contaminant. Because 121 of these contaminants were isolated in broth only, elimination of the broth culture would decrease unnecessary work. However, 25% of the meningitis associated with CNS shunts would have been missed by this practice. The most common cause of meningitis was Cryptococcus neoformans, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniaeand Neisseria meningitidis. In 48 of 56 (88%) of cases, examination of the Gram-stained specimen revealed the causative organism. If patients who had received effective antimicrobial therapy prior to lumbar puncture are excluded, the CSF Gram stain is 92% sensitive. Microscopic examination incorrectly suggested the presence of organisms in only 3 of 2,635 (0.1%) CSF examinations. Thus, microscopic examination of Gram-stained, concentrated CSF is highly sensitive and specific in early diagnosis of bacterial or fungal meningitis.

Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening infection. Although patients typically present with fever, headache, stiff neck, and altered mental status, these symptoms may be subtle in elderly or immunocompromised persons (1, 6, 7,18). Early implementation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy requires prompt identification of the infecting pathogen. Although culture is considered to be the definitive diagnostic test, microscopic examination of a Gram-stained specimen of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may provide immediate information about the causative microorganism. Previous studies have suggested that the sensitivity of this technique ranges from 60 to 90% and the specificity approaches 100% (1, 5,6, 8, 12, 18). Scheld concludes that the overall sensitivity is only 75% (14). It is often unclear whether earlier studies have stratified patients based upon their having received prior antimicrobial therapy. Further, the role of semiquantitative assessment of leukocytes (WBC) by microscopic examination as an indicator of infection (8, 12) is uncertain. The value of using broth culture in various populations is also questionable (9, 10,17). In the present study, we reviewed the results of microscopic examination and routine culture of 2,635 CSF specimens to establish the predictive value of the cytocentrifuged Gram stain and the usefulness of broth culture in a veteran population.

FULL TEXT

https://jcm.asm.org/content/36/6/1617

PDF

https://jcm.asm.org/content/jcm/36/6/1617.full.pdf

April 2, 2019 at 6:15 pm

Predictive Value of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Lactate Level vs CSF-Blood Glucose Ratio for the Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis Following Neurosurgery

Clinical Infectious Diseases July 1999 V.29 N.1 P.69-74

Stephen L. Leib; Remy Boscacci; Othmar Gratzl; Werner Zimmerli

The value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate level and CSF/blood glucose ratio for the identification of bacterial meningitis following neurosurgery was assessed in a retrospective study. During a 3-year period, 73 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and could be grouped by preset criteria in one of three categories: proven bacterial meningitis (n = 12), presumed bacterial meningitis (n = 14), and nonbacterial meningeal syndrome (n = 47). Of 73 patients analyzed, 45% were treated with antibiotics and 33% with steroids at the time of first lumbar puncture. CSF lactate values (cutoff, 4 mmol/L), in comparison with CSF/blood glucose ratios (cutoff, 0.4), were associated with higher sensitivity (0.88 vs. 0.77), specificity (0.98 vs. 0.87), and positive (0.96 vs. 0.77) and negative (0.94 vs. 0.87) predictive values. In conclusion, determination of the CSF lactate value is a quick, sensitive, and specific test to identify patients with bacterial meningitis after neurosurgery.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/29/1/69/323396

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

April 2, 2019 at 6:13 pm

Characterization of Chemical Meningitis after Neurological Surgery

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 2001 V.32 N.2 P.179-185

Pierre Forgacs; Carl A. Geyer; Stephen R. Freidberg

We reviewed the records of 70 consecutive adult patients with meningitis after a neurosurgical procedure, to determine the characteristics that might help to distinguish a sterile postoperative chemical meningitis from bacterial infection. The spinal fluid profiles in bacterial and chemical meningitis are similar. The exceptions are that a spinal fluid white blood cell count >7500/µL (7500 × 106/L) and a glucose level of <10 mg/dL were not found in any case of chemical meningitis. The clinical setting and clinical manifestations were distinct enough that no antibiotic was administered after lumbar puncture to 30 (43%) of the 70 patients with postoperative meningitis. Chemical meningitis was infrequent after surgery involving the spine and sinuses. Patients with chemical meningitis did not have purulent wound drainage or significant wound erythema or tenderness, coma, new focal neurological findings, or onset of a new seizure disorder. They rarely had temperatures >39.4°C or cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea or otorrhea.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/32/2/179/319157

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

April 2, 2019 at 6:10 pm

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