Posts filed under ‘Bacteriemias’

β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations: an update.

Medchemcomm. August 17, 2018  V.9 N.9 P.1439-1456.

Tehrani KHME1, Martin NI1,2.

Abstract

Antibiotic resistance caused by β-lactamase production continues to present a growing challenge to the efficacy of β-lactams and their role as the most important class of clinically used antibiotics. In response to this threat however, only a handful of β-lactamase inhibitors have been introduced to the market over the past thirty years. The first-generation β-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanic acid, sulbactam and tazobactam) are all β-lactam derivatives and work primarily by inactivating class A and some class C serine β-lactamases. The newer generations of β-lactamase inhibitors including avibactam and vaborbactam are based on non-β-lactam structures and their spectrum of inhibition is extended to KPC as an important class A carbapenemase. Despite these advances several class D and virtually all important class B β-lactamases are resistant to existing inhibitors. The present review provides an overview of recent FDA-approved β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations as well as an update on research efforts aimed at the discovery and development of novel β-lactamase inhibitors.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6151480/pdf/MD-009-C8MD00342D.pdf

February 18, 2020 at 9:53 am

Carbapenemases: the versatile beta-lactamases.

Clin Microbiol Rev. July 2007 V.20 N.3 P.440-58

Queenan AM1, Bush K.

Abstract

Carbapenemases are beta-lactamases with versatile hydrolytic capacities. They have the ability to hydrolyze penicillins, cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems. Bacteria producing these beta-lactamases may cause serious infections in which the carbapenemase activity renders many beta-lactams ineffective. Carbapenemases are members of the molecular class A, B, and D beta-lactamases. Class A and D enzymes have a serine-based hydrolytic mechanism, while class B enzymes are metallo-beta-lactamases that contain zinc in the active site. The class A carbapenemase group includes members of the SME, IMI, NMC, GES, and KPC families. Of these, the KPC carbapenemases are the most prevalent, found mostly on plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae. The class D carbapenemases consist of OXA-type beta-lactamases frequently detected in Acinetobacter baumannii. The metallo-beta-lactamases belong to the IMP, VIM, SPM, GIM, and SIM families and have been detected primarily in Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, there are increasing numbers of reports worldwide of this group of beta-lactamases in the Enterobacteriaceae. This review updates the characteristics, epidemiology, and detection of the carbapenemases found in pathogenic bacteria.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1932750/pdf/0001-07.pdf

February 18, 2020 at 9:52 am

Research Letter – New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase-5–Producing Escherichia coli in Companion Animals, US

Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal February 2020 V.26 N.2

We report isolation of a New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-5–producing carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli sequence type 167 from companion animals in the United States.

Reports of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in companion animals are rare.

We describe a unique cluster of blaNDM-5–producing E. coli in a veterinary hospital.

FULL TEXT

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/26/2/19-1221_article?deliveryName=DM17905

PDF (CLIC en DOWNLOAD ARTICLE)

January 27, 2020 at 8:00 am

Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults with Community-acquired Pneumonia. An Official Clinical Practice Guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine October 1, 2019 V.200 N.7

Background

This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

Methods

A multidisciplinary panel conducted pragmatic systematic reviews of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations.

Results

The panel addressed 16 specific areas for recommendations spanning questions of diagnostic testing, determination of site of care, selection of initial empiric antibiotic therapy, and subsequent management decisions. Although some recommendations remain unchanged from the 2007 guideline, the availability of results from new therapeutic trials and epidemiological investigations led to revised recommendations for empiric treatment strategies and additional management decisions.

Conclusions

The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected diagnostic and treatment strategies for adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

FULL TEXT

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST#_i6

PDF

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST

January 21, 2020 at 3:54 pm

From contamination to infective endocarditis—a population-based retrospective study of Corynebacterium isolated from blood cultures.

European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases January 2020 V.39 N.1 P.113-119   

Corynebacterium is a genus that can contaminate blood cultures and also cause severe infections like infective endocarditis (IE).

Our purpose was to investigate microbiological and clinical features associated with contamination and true infection.

A retrospective population-based study of Corynebacterium bacteremia 2012–2017 in southern Sweden was performed.

Corynebacterium isolates were species determined using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

Patient were, from the medical records, classified as having true infection or contamination caused by Corynebacterium through a scheme considering both bacteriological and clinical features and the groups were compared.

Three hundred thirty-nine episodes of bacteremia with Corynebacterium were identified in 335 patients of which 30 (8.8%) episodes were classified as true infection.

Thirteen patients with true bacteremia had only one positive blood culture. Infections were typically community acquired and affected mostly older males with comorbidities.

The focus of infection was most often unknown, and in-hospital mortality was around 10% in both the groups with true infection and contamination.

Corynebacterium jeikeium and Corynebacterium striatum were significantly overrepresented in the group with true infection, whereas Corynebacterium afermentans was significantly more common in the contamination group. Eight episodes of IE were identified, all of which in patients with heart valve prosthesis.

Six of the IE cases affected the aortic valve and six of seven patients were male. The species of Corynebacterium in blood cultures can help to determine if a finding represent true infection or contamination.

The finding of a single blood culture with Corynebacterium does not exclude true infection such as IE.

abstract

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10096-019-03698-6?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals&utm_source=toc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=toc_10096_39_1

PDF

https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs10096-019-03698-6.pdf

January 19, 2020 at 8:08 pm

2018 recommendations for the management of community acquired pneumonia.

J Bras Pneumol. September-October 2018 V.;44 N.5 P.405-423.   

Corrêa RA1, Costa AN2, Lundgren F3, Michelin L4, Figueiredo MR5, Holanda M6, Gomes M7, Teixeira PJZ8, Martins R9, Silva R10, Athanazio RA2, Silva RMD11, Pereira MC12.

Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the vast diversity of respiratory microbiota, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most prevalent pathogen among etiologic agents. Despite the significant decrease in the mortality rates for lower respiratory tract infections in recent decades, CAP ranks third as a cause of death in Brazil. Since the latest Guidelines on CAP from the Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia (SBPT, Brazilian Thoracic Association) were published (2009), there have been major advances in the application of imaging tests, in etiologic investigation, in risk stratification at admission and prognostic score stratification, in the use of biomarkers, and in the recommendations for antibiotic therapy (and its duration) and prevention through vaccination. To review these topics, the SBPT Committee on Respiratory Infections summoned 13 members with recognized experience in CAP in Brazil who identified issues relevant to clinical practice that require updates given the publication of new epidemiological and scientific evidence. Twelve topics concerning diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic, and preventive issues were developed. The topics were divided among the authors, who conducted a nonsystematic review of the literature, but giving priority to major publications in the specific areas, including original articles, review articles, and systematic reviews. All authors had the opportunity to review and comment on all questions, producing a single final document that was approved by consensus

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467584/pdf/1806-3713-jbpneu-44-05-00405.pdf

January 18, 2020 at 12:22 pm

Management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults: 2016 guideline update from the Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) and Dutch Association of Chest Physicians (NVALT).

Neth J Med. January 2018 V.76 N.1 P.:4-13.

Wiersinga WJ1, Bonten MJ, Boersma WG, Jonkers RE, Aleva RM, Kullberg BJ, Schouten JA, Degener JE, van de Garde EMW, Verheij TJ, Sachs APE, Prins JM.

Abstract

The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy in collaboration with the Dutch Association of Chest Physicians, the Dutch Society for Intensive Care and the Dutch College of General Practitioners have updated their evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults who present to the hospital. This 2016 update focuses on new data on the aetiological and radiological diagnosis of CAP, severity classification methods, initial antibiotic treatment in patients with severe CAP and the role of adjunctive corticosteroids. Other parts overlap with the 2011 guideline. Apart from the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands (2007-2010) no other shifts in the most common causative agents of CAP or in their resistance patterns were observed in the last five years. Low-dose CT scanning may ultimately replace the conventional chest X-ray; however, at present, there is insufficient evidence to advocate the use of CT scanning as the new standard in patients evaluated for CAP. A pneumococcal urine antigen test is now recommended for all patients presenting with severe CAP; a positive test result can help streamline therapy once clinical stability has been reached and no other pathogens have been detected. Coverage for atypical microorganisms is no longer recommended in empirical treatment of severe CAP in the non-intensive care setting. For these patients (with CURB-65 score >2 or Pneumonia Severity Index score of 5) empirical therapy with a 2nd/3rd generation cephalosporin is recommended, because of the relatively high incidence of Gram-negative bacteria, and to a lesser extent S. aureus. Corticosteroids are not recommended as adjunctive therapy for CAP

PDF

http://www.njmonline.nl/getpdf.php?id=1933

January 18, 2020 at 12:21 pm

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