Posts filed under ‘BIOMARCADORES’

Efficacy and accuracy of qSOFA and SOFA scores as prognostic tools for community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia

International Journal of Infectious Diseases July 2019 V.84 P.89-96

Nobuhiro Asai, Hiroki Watanabe, Arufumi Shiota, Hideo Kato, Daisuke Sakanashi, Mao Hagihara, Yusuke Koizumi, Yuka Yamagishi, Hiroyuki Suematsu, Hiroshige Mikamo

Highlights

  • The Japanese Respiratory Society recently updated the prognostic guidelines for pneumonia in 2017.
  • The new guidelines recommend that pneumonia severity be evaluated using the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and the quick SOFA (qSOFA) scoring systems in a therapeutic strategy flowchart.
  • The combination of qSOFA and SOFA score could be an independent prognostic factor for 30-day mortality among patients with community-onset pneumonia.

Background

The Japanese Respiratory Society recently updated its prognostic guidelines for pneumonia, recommending that pneumonia severity be evaluated using the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and quick SOFA (qSOFA) scoring systems in a therapeutic strategy flowchart. However, the efficacy and accuracy of these tools are still unknown.

Methods

All patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) who were admitted to the study institution between 2014 and 2017 were enrolled in this study. Pneumonia severity on admission was evaluated by A-DROP, CURB-65, PSI, I-ROAD, qSOFA, and SOFA scoring systems. Prognostic factors for 30-day mortality were also analyzed.

Results

This study included 406 patients, 257 male (63%) and 149 female (37%). The median age was 79 years (range 19–103 years). The 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates were both 5%. With respect to the diagnostic value of the predictive assessments for 30-day mortality, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) value for the SOFA score was 0.769 for CAP patients and 0.774 for HCAP patients. Further, the AUROC values for the SOFA score in CAP and HCAP patients with a qSOFA score ≥2 were 0.829 and 0.784, respectively, for 30-day mortality.

Conclusions

qSOFA and SOFA scores were able to correctly evaluate the severity of CAP and HCAP.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30190-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30190-0/pdf

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June 30, 2019 at 9:25 pm

Antibiotic penetration into bone and joints: An updated review

International Journal of Infectious Diseases April 2019 V.81 N.4 P.128-136

Abrar K. Thabit, Dania F. Fatani, Maryam S. Bamakhrama, Ola A. Barnawi, Lana O. Basudan, Shahad F. Alhejaili

Highlights

  • Despite the rigid structure of bone, many antibiotics demonstrated a good penetration profile.
  • Diffusion into synovial fluid was exhibited by many antibiotics despite their variation in pharmacokinetic properties.
  • Only penicillin, flucloxacillin, and metronidazole showed lower than optimum penetration profiles.
  • Antibiotics with good penetration profiles in bone and joints represent potential options for the treatment of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

Treatment of bone and joint infections can be challenging as antibiotics should penetrate through the rigid bone structure and into the synovial space. Several pharmacokinetic studies measured the extent of penetration of different antibiotics into bone and joint tissues. This review discusses the results of these studies and compares them with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of common pathogens implicated in bone and joint infections in order to determine which antibiotics may have a greater potential in the treatment of such infections. Clinical outcomes were also evaluated as data were available. More than 30 antibiotics were evaluated. Overall, most antibiotics, including amoxicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, cloxacillin, cephalosporins, carbapenems, aztreonam, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, doxycycline, vancomycin, linezolid, daptomycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, fosfomycin, rifampin, dalbavancin, and oritavancin, showed good penetration into bone and joint tissues reaching concentrations exceeding the MIC90 and/or MIC breakpoints of common bone and joint infections pathogens. Few exceptions include penicillin and metronidazole which showed a lower than optimum penetration into bones, and the latter as well as flucloxacillin had poor profiles in terms of joint space penetration. Of note, studies on joint space penetration were fewer than studies on bone tissue penetration. Although clinical studies in osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are not available for all of the evaluated antibiotics, these pharmacokinetic results indicate that agents with good penetration profiles would have a potential utilization in such infections.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30069-4/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30069-4/pdf

June 30, 2019 at 12:23 pm

Still fighting prosthetic joint infection after knee replacement

LANCET Infectous Diseases June 2019 V.19 N.6

COMMENT – Still fighting prosthetic joint infection after knee replacement

We congratulate Erik Lenguerrand and colleagues on the publication of their paper in The Lancet Infectious Diseases1 and respect that it is a well-conducted study. In their large-scale observational study, the authors collected data from the UK National Joint Registry including a total of 679 010 primary knee arthroplasty cases and evaluated associations between patient, surgical, and healthcare system factors and the risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest cohort study to date analysing the risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection following primary total knee replacement…

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(19)30067-2/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2819%2930067-2

 

 

LANCET Infectous Diseases June 2019 V.19 N.6

Risk factors associated with revision for prosthetic joint infection following knee replacement: an observational cohort study from England and Wales

Background

Prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication of knee replacement. The risk of developing a prosthetic joint infection is affected by patient, surgical, and health-care system factors. Existing evidence is limited by heterogeneity in populations studied, short follow-up, inadequate power, and does not differentiate early prosthetic joint infection, most likely related to the intervention, from late infection, more likely to occur due to haematogenous bacterial spread. We aimed to assess the overall and time-specific associations of these factors with the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection following primary knee replacement.

Methods

In this cohort study, we analysed primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales and the procedures subsequently revised for prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014. Data were obtained from the National Joint Registry linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics data in England and the Patient Episode Database for Wales. Each primary replacement was followed for a minimum of 12 months until the end of the observation period (Dec 31, 2014) or until the date of revision for prosthetic joint infection, revision for another indication, or death (whichever occurred first). We analysed the data using Poisson and piecewise exponential multilevel models to assess the associations between patient, surgical, and health-care system factors and risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection.

Findings

Of 679 010 primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales, 3659 were subsequently revised for an indication of prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014, after a median follow-up of 4·6 years (IQR 2·6–6·9). Male sex (rate ratio [RR] for male vs female patients 1·8 [95% CI 1·7–2·0]), younger age (RR for age ≥80 years vs <60 years 0·5 [0·4–0·6]), higher American Society of Anaesthesiologists [ASA] grade (RR for ASA grade 3–5 vs 1, 1·8 [1·6–2·1]), elevated body-mass index (BMI; RR for BMI ≥30 kg/m2 vs <25 kg/m2 1·5 [1·3–1·6]), chronic pulmonary disease (RR 1·2 [1·1–1·3]), diabetes (RR 1·4 [1·2–1·5]), liver disease (RR 2·2 [1·6–2·9]), connective tissue and rheumatic diseases (RR 1·5 [1·3–1·7]), peripheral vascular disease (RR 1·4 [1·1–1·7]), surgery for trauma (RR 1·9 [1·4–2·6]), previous septic arthritis (RR 4·9 [2·7–7·6]) or inflammatory arthropathy (RR 1·4 [1·2–1·7]), operation under general anaesthesia (RR 1·1 [1·0–1·2]), requirement for tibial bone graft (RR 2·0 [1·3–2·7]), use of posterior stabilised fixed bearing prostheses (RR for posterior stabilised fixed bearing prostheses vs unconstrained fixed bearing prostheses 1·4 [1·3–1·5]) or constrained condylar prostheses (3·5 [2·5–4·7]) were associated with a higher risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. However, uncemented total, patellofemoral, or unicondylar knee replacement (RR for uncemented vs cemented total knee replacement 0·7 [95% CI 0·6–0·8], RR for patellofemoral vs cemented total knee replacement 0·3 [0·2–0·5], and RR for unicondylar vs cemented total knee replacement 0·5 [0·5–0·6]) were associated with lower risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. Most of these factors had time-specific effects, depending on the time period post-surgery.

Interpretation

We have identified several risk factors for revision for prosthetic joint infection following knee replacement. Some of these factors are modifiable, and the use of targeted interventions or strategies could lead to a reduced risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. Non-modifiable factors and the time-specific nature of the effects we have observed will allow clinicians to appropriately counsel patients preoperatively and tailor follow-up regimens.

Funding

National Institute for Health Research.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(18)30755- 2/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2818%2930755-2

May 24, 2019 at 7:39 am

2017 WSES and SICG guidelines on acute calcolous cholecystitis in elderly population

World J Emerg Surg. 2019 Mar 4;14:10.

Pisano M, Ceresoli M, Cimbanassi S, Gurusamy K, Coccolini F, Borzellino G, et al

Background

Gallstone disease is very common afflicting 20 million people in the USA. In Europe, the overall incidence of gallstone disease is 18.8% in women and 9.5% in men. The frequency of gallstones related disease increases by age. The elderly population is increasing worldwide.

Aim

The present guidelines aims to report the results of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) and Italian Surgical Society for Elderly (SICG) consensus conference on acute calcolous cholecystitis (ACC) focused on elderly population.

Material and methods

The 2016 WSES guidelines on ACC were used as baseline; six questions have been used to investigate the particularities in elderly population; the answers have been developed in terms of differences compared to the general population and to statements of the 2016 WSES Guidelines. The Consensus Conference discusses, voted, and modified the statements. International experts contributed in the elaboration of final statements and evaluation of the level of scientific evidences.

Results

The quality of the studies available decreases when we approach ACC in elderly. Same admission laparoscopic cholecystectomy should be suggested for elderly people with ACC; frailty scores as well as clinical and surgical risk scores could be adopted but no general consensus exist. The role of cholecystostomy is uncertain.

Discussion and conclusions

The evaluation of pro and cons for surgery or for alternative treatments in elderly suffering of ACC is more complex than in young people; also, the oldest old age is not a contraindication for surgery; however, a larger use of frailty and surgical risk scores could contribute to reach the best clinical judgment by the surgeon. The present guidelines offer the opportunity to share with the scientific community a baseline for future researches and discussion.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399945/

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399945/pdf/13017_2019_Article_224.pdf

April 3, 2019 at 8:37 am

Microscopic Examination and Broth Culture of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Diagnosis of Meningitis

Journal of Clinical Microbiology June 1998 V.36 N.6 P.1617-1620

Dunbar SA et al

We reviewed the results of microscopic Gram stain examination and routine culture for 2,635 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples processed in an adult hospital microbiology laboratory during 55 months. There were 56 instances of bacterial or fungal meningitis (16 associated with central nervous system [CNS] shunt infection), four infections adjacent to the subarachnoid space, four cases of sepsis without meningitis, and an additional 220 CSF specimens with positive cultures in which the organism isolated was judged to be a contaminant. Because 121 of these contaminants were isolated in broth only, elimination of the broth culture would decrease unnecessary work. However, 25% of the meningitis associated with CNS shunts would have been missed by this practice. The most common cause of meningitis was Cryptococcus neoformans, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniaeand Neisseria meningitidis. In 48 of 56 (88%) of cases, examination of the Gram-stained specimen revealed the causative organism. If patients who had received effective antimicrobial therapy prior to lumbar puncture are excluded, the CSF Gram stain is 92% sensitive. Microscopic examination incorrectly suggested the presence of organisms in only 3 of 2,635 (0.1%) CSF examinations. Thus, microscopic examination of Gram-stained, concentrated CSF is highly sensitive and specific in early diagnosis of bacterial or fungal meningitis.

Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening infection. Although patients typically present with fever, headache, stiff neck, and altered mental status, these symptoms may be subtle in elderly or immunocompromised persons (1, 6, 7,18). Early implementation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy requires prompt identification of the infecting pathogen. Although culture is considered to be the definitive diagnostic test, microscopic examination of a Gram-stained specimen of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may provide immediate information about the causative microorganism. Previous studies have suggested that the sensitivity of this technique ranges from 60 to 90% and the specificity approaches 100% (1, 5,6, 8, 12, 18). Scheld concludes that the overall sensitivity is only 75% (14). It is often unclear whether earlier studies have stratified patients based upon their having received prior antimicrobial therapy. Further, the role of semiquantitative assessment of leukocytes (WBC) by microscopic examination as an indicator of infection (8, 12) is uncertain. The value of using broth culture in various populations is also questionable (9, 10,17). In the present study, we reviewed the results of microscopic examination and routine culture of 2,635 CSF specimens to establish the predictive value of the cytocentrifuged Gram stain and the usefulness of broth culture in a veteran population.

FULL TEXT

https://jcm.asm.org/content/36/6/1617

PDF

https://jcm.asm.org/content/jcm/36/6/1617.full.pdf

April 2, 2019 at 6:15 pm

Predictive Value of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Lactate Level vs CSF-Blood Glucose Ratio for the Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis Following Neurosurgery

Clinical Infectious Diseases July 1999 V.29 N.1 P.69-74

Stephen L. Leib; Remy Boscacci; Othmar Gratzl; Werner Zimmerli

The value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate level and CSF/blood glucose ratio for the identification of bacterial meningitis following neurosurgery was assessed in a retrospective study. During a 3-year period, 73 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and could be grouped by preset criteria in one of three categories: proven bacterial meningitis (n = 12), presumed bacterial meningitis (n = 14), and nonbacterial meningeal syndrome (n = 47). Of 73 patients analyzed, 45% were treated with antibiotics and 33% with steroids at the time of first lumbar puncture. CSF lactate values (cutoff, 4 mmol/L), in comparison with CSF/blood glucose ratios (cutoff, 0.4), were associated with higher sensitivity (0.88 vs. 0.77), specificity (0.98 vs. 0.87), and positive (0.96 vs. 0.77) and negative (0.94 vs. 0.87) predictive values. In conclusion, determination of the CSF lactate value is a quick, sensitive, and specific test to identify patients with bacterial meningitis after neurosurgery.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/29/1/69/323396

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

April 2, 2019 at 6:13 pm

Characterization of Chemical Meningitis after Neurological Surgery

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 2001 V.32 N.2 P.179-185

Pierre Forgacs; Carl A. Geyer; Stephen R. Freidberg

We reviewed the records of 70 consecutive adult patients with meningitis after a neurosurgical procedure, to determine the characteristics that might help to distinguish a sterile postoperative chemical meningitis from bacterial infection. The spinal fluid profiles in bacterial and chemical meningitis are similar. The exceptions are that a spinal fluid white blood cell count >7500/µL (7500 × 106/L) and a glucose level of <10 mg/dL were not found in any case of chemical meningitis. The clinical setting and clinical manifestations were distinct enough that no antibiotic was administered after lumbar puncture to 30 (43%) of the 70 patients with postoperative meningitis. Chemical meningitis was infrequent after surgery involving the spine and sinuses. Patients with chemical meningitis did not have purulent wound drainage or significant wound erythema or tenderness, coma, new focal neurological findings, or onset of a new seizure disorder. They rarely had temperatures >39.4°C or cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea or otorrhea.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/32/2/179/319157

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

April 2, 2019 at 6:10 pm

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