Posts filed under ‘CONSENSOS’

Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: 2019 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of Americaa.

Clin Infect Dis. March 21, 2019 pii: ciy1121. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy1121. [Epub ahead of print]

Nicolle LE1, Gupta K2, Bradley SF3, Colgan R4, DeMuri GP5, Drekonja D6, Eckert LO7, Geerlings SE8, Köves B9, Hooton TM10, Juthani-Mehta M11, Knight SL12, Saint S13, Schaeffer AJ14, Trautner B15, Wullt B16, Siemieniuk R17.

Author information

1 Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

2 Division of Infectious Diseases, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System and Boston University School of Medicine, West Roxbury, Massachusetts.

3 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

4 Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore.

5 Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

6 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

7 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle.

8 Department of Internal Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Center, The Netherlands.

9 Department of Urology, South Pest Teaching Hospital, Budapest, Hungary.

10 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Miami, Florida.

11 Division of Infectious Diseases, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

12 Library and Knowledge Services, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado.

13 Department of Internal Medicine, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor and University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

14 Department of Urology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

15 Section of Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

16 Division of Microbiology, Immunology and Glycobiology, Lund, Sweden.

17 Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a common finding in many populations, including healthy women and persons with underlying urologic abnormalities. The 2005 guideline from the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommended that ASB should be screened for and treated only in pregnant women or in an individual prior to undergoing invasive urologic procedures. Treatment was not recommended for healthy women; older women or men; or persons with diabetes, indwelling catheters, or spinal cord injury. The guideline did not address children and some adult populations, including patients with neutropenia, solid organ transplants, and nonurologic surgery. In the years since the publication of the guideline, further information relevant to ASB has become available. In addition, antimicrobial treatment of ASB has been recognized as an important contributor to inappropriate antimicrobial use, which promotes emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The current guideline updates the recommendations of the 2005 guideline, includes new recommendations for populations not previously addressed, and, where relevant, addresses the interpretation of nonlocalizing clinical symptoms in populations with a high prevalence of ASB.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/68/10/e83/5407612

PDF (CLIC PDF)

Advertisements

August 29, 2019 at 6:10 pm

Point-Counterpoint: Differences between the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Recommendations for Reporting Antimicrobial Susceptibility Results

Journal of Clinical Microbiology September 2019 V.57 N.9

Gunnar Kahlmeter (a,b) Christian G. Giske (a,c) Thomas J. Kirn (d) Susan E. Sharp (e)

a EUCAST Steering Committee

b Clinical Microbiology, Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden

c Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

d Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA

e Copan Diagnostics, Inc., Murrieta, California, USA

Antibiotic susceptibility test results are among the most important results issued by clinical microbiology laboratories because they routinely guide critical treatment decisions. Interpretations of MIC or disk diffusion test results, such as “susceptible” or “resistant,” are easily understood. Clinical laboratories also need to determine whether and how their reports will reflect more complex situations. Such situations include, first, whether there is need to administer higher or more frequent doses of antibiotic than usual for clinical efficacy; second, whether an antimicrobial is likely to be effective at a body site where it concentrates; and third, whether there is some uncertainty in the test results due to technical variability that cannot be eliminated. Two leading organizations that set standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), have taken different strategies to deal with these challenges. In this Point-Counterpoint, Gunnar Kahlmeter and Christian Giske discuss how EUCAST is addressing these issues, and Thomas Kirn and Susan Sharp discuss the CLSI approach.

abstract

https://jcm.asm.org/content/57/9/e01129-19.abstract?etoc

PDF

https://jcm.asm.org/content/jcm/57/9/e01129-19.full.pdf

August 26, 2019 at 3:37 pm

2018 European Guideline on the organization of a consultation for Sexually Transmitted Infections.

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. August 2019 V.33 N.8 P.1452-1458.

Gamoudi D, Flew S, Cusini M, Benardon S, Poder A, Radcliffe K.

This is an update of the 2012 IUSTI guideline. In this new version, we have expanded the sections on sexual history taking to include PEP and PrEP use, intimate partner and gender‐based violence, chemsex, swinging and psychosexual problems. We highlight the potential for the use of technology in the context of sexual health to facilitate sexual history taking and partner notification. We have explained the principle of safeguarding young and other vulnerable people who may present to services.

This guideline is primarily aimed at services provided in mainstream clinic/office environments, but increasingly many countries are seeing an era of rapid transition of sexual health services in which satellite clinics and online service provision are centre stage. Services are moving away from the main hospitals/clinics into smaller peripheral sites and various non‐traditional or outreach type settings such as saunas, brothels, bars, clubs, educational facilities, prisons and gay pride events. The advantage of such services is that it might allow hard‐to‐reach groups to be engaged with clinical services.1 We need a cohesive, multiagency approach to addressing the challenges associated with this style of service provision, if we are to harness the potential for decentralization of sexual health services while safeguarding the most vulnerable and remaining true to the founding principles of sexual health care.

FULL TEXT

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jdv.15577

PDF

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/jdv.15577

August 14, 2019 at 3:49 pm

2011 GUIA MEXICANA – SARCOMA de KAPOSI en pacientes HIV positivos – Guía Práctica Clínica

2011 GUIA MEXICANA – SARCOMA de KAPOSI en pacientes HIV positivos – Guía Práctica Clínica 55p

 Preguntas a responder por esta guía

  1. ¿Cuáles son los factores de riesgo para desarrollar sarcoma de Kaposi?
  2. ¿Qué estudios se deben solicitar al tener sospecha de sarcoma de Kaposi?
  3. ¿Cuál es la tipificación del sarcoma de Kaposi, para toma de decisión de tratamiento?
  4. De acuerdo a la clasificación de riesgo, ¿cuál es la mejor alternativa terapéutica?
  5. ¿Cuál es el papel de la terapia antirretroviral?
  6. ¿Cuál es el beneficio de inicio de terapia sistémica con quimioterapia en pacientes de bajo riesgo?
  7. ¿Cuál es el mejor esquema de tratamiento sistémico con quimioterapia en pacientes con sarcoma de Kaposi de alto riesgo?
  1. ¿Cuáles son las indicaciones de radioterapia en esta neoplasia?
  2. ¿Qué papel tiene el interferón en el manejo del sarcoma de Kaposi?
  3. ¿Cuáles son los criterios para decidir la referencia al tercer nivel?
  4. De los pacientes que requirieron atención en tercer nivel, ¿cuáles son los criterios para su contra referencia a segundo nivel?

http://www.imss.gob.mx/sites/all/statics/guiasclinicas/462GER.pdf

July 1, 2019 at 11:14 am

2018 European guideline on the organization of a consultation for sexually transmitted infections

Journal of The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

New in the 2018 guidelines

This is an update of the 2012 IUSTI guideline. In this new version, we have expanded the sections on sexual history taking to include PEP and PrEP use, intimate partner and gender‐based violence, chemsex, swinging and psychosexual problems. We highlight the potential for the use of technology in the context of sexual health to facilitate sexual history taking and partner notification. We have explained the principle of safeguarding young and other vulnerable people who may present to services.

This guideline is primarily aimed at services provided in mainstream clinic/office environments, but increasingly many countries are seeing an era of rapid transition of sexual health services in which satellite clinics and online service provision are centre stage. Services are moving away from the main hospitals/clinics into smaller peripheral sites and various non‐traditional or outreach type settings such as saunas, brothels, bars, clubs, educational facilities, prisons and gay pride events. The advantage of such services is that it might allow hard‐to‐reach groups to be engaged with clinical services.1 We need a cohesive, multiagency approach to addressing the challenges associated with this style of service provision, if we are to harness the potential for decentralization of sexual health services while safeguarding the most vulnerable and remaining true to the founding principles of sexual health care….

FULL TEXT

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jdv.15577

PDF

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/jdv.15577

June 17, 2019 at 10:39 am

Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: 2019 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America

Clinical Infectious Diseases May 15, 2019 V.68 N.10 P.1611-1615

IDSA GUIDELINES

Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a common finding in many populations, including healthy women and persons with underlying urologic abnormalities. The 2005 guideline from the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommended that ASB should be screened for and treated only in pregnant women or in an individual prior to undergoing invasive urologic procedures. Treatment was not recommended for healthy women; older women or men; or persons with diabetes, indwelling catheters, or spinal cord injury. The guideline did not address children and some adult populations, including patients with neutropenia, solid organ transplants, and nonurologic surgery. In the years since the publication of the guideline, further information relevant to ASB has become available. In addition, antimicrobial treatment of ASB has been recognized as an important contributor to inappropriate antimicrobial use, which promotes emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The current guideline updates the recommendations of the 2005 guideline, includes new recommendations for populations not previously addressed, and, where relevant, addresses the interpretation of nonlocalizing clinical symptoms in populations with a high prevalence of ASB.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/68/10/1611/5481760

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

May 5, 2019 at 12:04 pm

Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America: 2018 Update on Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management of Seasonal Influenza.

Clinical Infectious Diseases March 5, 2019 V.68 N.6 P.e1-e47.   

Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America: 2018 Update on Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management of Seasonal Influenza.

Uyeki TM1, Bernstein HH2, Bradley JS3,4, Englund JA5, File TM6, Fry AM1, Gravenstein S7, Hayden FG8, Harper SA9, Hirshon JM10, Ison MG11, Johnston BL12, Knight SL13, McGeer A14, Riley LE15, Wolfe CR16, Alexander PE17,18, Pavia AT19.

Abstract

These clinical practice guidelines are an update of the guidelines published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in 2009, prior to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This document addresses new information regarding diagnostic testing, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal influenza. It is intended for use by primary care clinicians, obstetricians, emergency medicine providers, hospitalists, laboratorians, and infectious disease specialists, as well as other clinicians managing patients with suspected or laboratory-confirmed influenza. The guidelines consider the care of children and adults, including special populations such as pregnant and postpartum women and immunocompromised patients.

Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2018.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/68/6/e1/5251935

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

May 1, 2019 at 6:23 pm

Older Posts


Calendar

September 2019
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category