Posts filed under ‘FIEBRE en el POST-VIAJE’

Editor’s Choice: Coinfection With Zika and Dengue-2 Viruses in a Traveler Returning From Haiti, 2016: Clinical Presentation and Genetic Analysis

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 1, 2017 V.64 N.1 P.72-75

BRIEF REPORTS

Nicole M. Iovine, John Lednicky, Kartikeya Cherabuddi, Hannah Crooke, Sarah K. White, Julia C. Loeb, Eleonora Cella, Massimo Ciccozzi, Marco Salemi, and J. Glenn Morris, Jr

1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine

2Emerging Pathogens Institute

3Department of Environmental and Global Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions

4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions

5Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville

6Department of Infectious Parasitic and Immunomediated Diseases, Reference Centre on Phylogeny, Molecular Epidemiology and Microbial Evolution/Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy

Zika virus and dengue virus serotype 2 were isolated from a patient with travel to Haiti who developed fever, rash, arthralgias, and conjunctivitis. The infecting Zika virus was related to Venezuelan and Brazilian strains but evolved along a lineage originating from strains isolated in 2014 in the same region of Haiti.

PDF

https://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/1/72.full.pdf+html

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August 19, 2017 at 10:26 am

EDITORIAL – Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

Rev.MVZ Córdoba 20(3):4675-4676, 2015

Virus de Oropuche: Un virus ignorado pero presente

El virus de Oropouche deriva su nombre de la localidad de Vegas de Oropuche, la cual se encuentra en la isla de Trinidad y Tobago, en donde fue detectado en 1955 en un paciente febril y en mosquitos Coquilletidia venezuelenzis.

El virus de Oropouche es prevalente en muchas regiones de América del Sur y del Caribe.

En el ciclo silvestre, el virus tiene varios mosquitos vectores: Culicoides paraensis, Coquilletidia venezuelenzis y Aedes serratus.

Los mamíferos silvestres son picados por estos mosquitos y aumentan las viremias, como en el oso perezoso (Bradypus tridactiyus), primates (Aloutta sanguinus) y roedores entre otros.

En el ciclo urbano los vectores son mosquitos Culicoides paraensis y Culex quinquefasciatus, ambos muy comunes en los ambientes tropicales de Colombia …

PDF

http://www.scielo.org.co/pdf/mvz/v20n3/v20n3a01.pdf

August 16, 2017 at 2:02 pm

Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure — United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017

MMWR July 28, 2017 V.66 N.29 P.781-793

Update

Titilope Oduyebo, MD1; Kara D. Polen, MPH1; Henry T. Walke, MD1; Sarah Reagan-Steiner, MD1; Eva Lathrop, MD1; Ingrid B. Rabe, MBChB1; Wendi L. Kuhnert-Tallman, PhD1; Stacey W. Martin, MSc1; Allison T. Walker, PhD1; Christopher J. Gregory, MD1; Edwin W. Ades, PhD1; Darin S. Carroll, PhD1; Maria Rivera, MPH1; Janice Perez-Padilla, MPH1; Carolyn Gould, MD1; Jeffrey B. Nemhauser, MD1; C. Ben Beard, PhD1; Jennifer L. Harcourt, PhD1; Laura Viens, MD1; Michael Johansson, PhD1; Sascha R. Ellington, MSPH1; Emily Petersen, MD1; Laura A. Smith, MA1; Jessica Reichard, MPA1; Jorge Munoz-Jordan, PhD1; Michael J. Beach, PhD1; Dale A. Rose, PhD1; Ezra Barzilay, MD1; Michelle Noonan-Smith1; Denise J. Jamieson, MD1; Sherif R. Zaki, MD1; Lyle R. Petersen, MD1; Margaret A. Honein, PhD1; Dana Meaney-Delman, MD1

CDC has updated the interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure in response to 1) declining prevalence of Zika virus disease in the World Health Organization’s Region of the Americas (Americas) and 2) emerging evidence indicating prolonged detection of Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies.

Zika virus cases were first reported in the Americas during 2015–2016; however, the incidence of Zika virus disease has since declined.

As the prevalence of Zika virus disease declines, the likelihood of false-positive test results increases. In addition, emerging epidemiologic and laboratory data indicate that, as is the case with other flaviviruses, Zika virus IgM antibodies can persist beyond 12 weeks after infection.

Therefore, IgM test results cannot always reliably distinguish between an infection that occurred during the current pregnancy and one that occurred before the current pregnancy, particularly for women with possible Zika virus exposure before the current pregnancy.

These limitations should be considered when counseling pregnant women about the risks and benefits of testing for Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

This updated guidance emphasizes a shared decision-making model for testing and screening pregnant women, one in which patients and providers work together to make decisions about testing and care plans based on patient preferences and values, clinical judgment, and a balanced assessment of risks and expected outcomes…..

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/pdfs/mm6629e1.pdf

July 28, 2017 at 5:17 pm

False-Positive Rapid Malaria Antigen Test Result in a Returned Traveler

Journal of Clinical Microbiology August 2017 V.55 N.8 P.2294-2297

The Brief Case

Kristle L. Haberichter, Paul C. Johnson, Paul J. Chittick, Peter Millward, Barbara Robinson-Dunn, and Bobby L. Boyanton Jr.

A previously healthy 43-year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a 13-day history of recurrent nightly fevers (100°F to 101°F), nonproductive cough, and respiratory congestion. She was prescribed azithromycin, albuterol, and benzonatate. She presented to the emergency center 2 days later without improvement and at that time reported night sweats. She had recently traveled to Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and the United Arab Emirates. The nightly fevers began 11 days after returning home. She acknowledged being bitten by mosquitoes throughout her travels and did not take malaria prophylaxis.

A previously healthy 43-year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a 13-day history of recurrent nightly fevers (100°F to 101°F), nonproductive cough, and respiratory congestion. She was prescribed azithromycin, albuterol, and benzonatate. She presented to the emergency center 2 days later without improvement and at that time reported night sweats. She had recently traveled to Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and the United Arab Emirates. The nightly fevers began 11 days after returning home. She acknowledged being bitten by mosquitoes throughout her travels and did not take malaria prophylaxis….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/8/2294.full.pdf+html

 

 

Journal of Clinical Microbiology August 2017 V.55 N.8 P.2560-2561

Closing the Brief Case: False-Positive Rapid Malaria Antigen Test Result in a Returned Traveler

Kristle L. Haberichter, Paul C. Johnson, Paul J. Chittick, Peter Millward, Barbara Robinson-Dunn, and Bobby L. Boyanton Jr.

aDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA

bDepartment of Infectious Disease, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA

cOakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, Michigan, USA

ANSWERS TO SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/8/2560.full.pdf+html

July 26, 2017 at 9:23 am

Sexual transmission of American trypanosomiasis in humans: a new potential pandemic route for Chagas parasites

Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz June 2017 V.112 N.6

Perla F Araujo1, Adriana B Almeida1, Carlos F Pimentel1, Adriano R Silva1, Alessandro Sousa1, Sebastião A Valente2,

Vera C Valente2, Manuela M Britto1, Ana C Rosa1, Rozeneide M Alves1, Luciana Hagström1, Antonio RL Teixeira1  *  +

1Universidade de Brasília, Faculdade de Medicina, Laboratório Multidisciplinar de Pesquisa em Doença de Chagas, Brasília, DF, Brasil

2Instituto Evandro Chagas, Belém, PA, Brasil

BACKGROUND

The Trypanosoma cruzi infection endemic in Latin America has now spread to several countries across four continents; this endemic involves triatomine vector-free protists. We hypothesised that the sexual transmission of T. cruzi contributes to the ongoing spread of Chagas disease.

OBJECTIVES

A short-term longitudinal study was conducted to evaluate this hypothesis.

METHODS

The study population comprised 109 subjects from four families, among whom 21 had been diagnosed with acute Chagas disease by direct parasitological analysis. Blood mononuclear cells and serum samples were obtained from each study subject once per year for three consecutive years. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence serological examinations were used to detect specific T. cruzi antibodies. Polymerase chain reaction of T. cruzi DNA revealed 188-nucleotide bands, which hybridised to a specific radiolabelled probe and were confirmed by cloning and sequencing.

RESULTS

Three independent assessments at different time points revealed T. cruzi nuclear DNA footprints in 76% (83/109) of the study population with active infection. In contrast, the ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assays detected the T. cruzi antibody in 28.4% (31/109) of the study samples. Moreover, the semen from 82.6% (19/23) of subjects people revealed harboured the 188- bp base pair T. cruzi footprint. Interestingly, the ejaculates of nuclear DNA-positive Chagas patient transmitted the T. cruzi upon peritoneal injection or infusion in the vagina of mice, and amastigotes were detected in the skeletal muscle, myocardium, vas deferens, and uterine tube.

MAIN CONCLUSIONS

T. cruzi infections can be transmitted from females or males to naïve mates through intercourse, and progeny showed discrepancies between the ratios of nuclear DNA footprints and specific antibody that can be explained by the tolerance attained during early embryo growth. Additional studies are needed to develop drugs to eradicate the infections. Additionally, the importance of a vigorous education, information, and communication program to prevent sexually transmitted Chagas disease in humans cannot be underemphasised.

PDF

http://www.scielo.br/pdf/mioc/v112n6/0074-0276-mioc-112-6-0437.pdf

July 14, 2017 at 8:23 am

Epidemiology of human plague in the United States, 1900-2012.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Jan;21(1):16-22.

Kugeler KJ, Staples JE, Hinckley AF, Gage KL, Mead PS.

Abstract

We summarize the characteristics of 1,006 cases of human plague occurring in the United States over 113 years, beginning with the first documented case in 1900.

Three distinct eras can be identified on the basis of the frequency, nature, and geographic distribution of cases. During 1900-1925, outbreaks were common but were restricted to populous port cities.

During 1926-1964, the geographic range of disease expanded rapidly, while the total number of reported cases fell. During 1965-2012, sporadic cases occurred annually, primarily in the rural Southwest.

Clinical and demographic features of human illness have shifted over time as the disease has moved from crowded cities to the rural West.

These shifts reflect changes in the populations at risk, the advent of antibiotics, and improved detection of more clinically indistinct forms of infection.

Overall, the emergence of human plague in the United States parallels observed patterns of introduction of exotic plants and animals.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4285253/pdf/14-0564.pdf

June 29, 2017 at 8:17 am

Gentamicin and tetracyclines for the treatment of human plague: review of 75 cases in new Mexico, 1985-1999.

Clin Infect Dis. MARCH 2004 Mar 1;38(5):663-9.

Boulanger LL1, Ettestad P, Fogarty JD, Dennis DT, Romig D, Mertz G.

Author information

1 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA. lucyjohn@hotmail.com

Abstract

Streptomycin, an antimicrobial with limited availability, is the treatment of choice for plague, a fulminating and potentially epidemic disease that poses a bioterrorism concern. We evaluated the efficacy of gentamicin and tetracyclines for treating human plague. A medical record review was conducted on all 75 patients with plague who were reported in New Mexico during 1985-1999. Fifty patients were included in an analysis that compared streptomycin-treated patients (n=14) with those treated with gentamicin and/or a tetracycline (n=36). The mean numbers of fever days, hospital days, and complications and the number of deaths did not differ between patients treated with streptomycin and those treated with gentamicin. One patient who received tetracycline alone experienced a serious complication. Gentamicin alone or in combination with a tetracycline was as efficacious as streptomycin for treating human plague. The efficacy of a tetracycline alone could not be determined from the study.

PDF

https://oup.silverchair-cdn.com/oup/backfile/Content_public/Journal/cid/38/5/10.1086/381545/2/38-5-663.pdf?Expires=1498827128&Signature=LoBuf2os660n~z7jhBjm5hWOK27YiZe~p108SitqKZHdaaz90DyfMMZwRNA6Kk6RfuSBseh4I0cfwycZFhOO1oPeANkLDzIKvLRe~uSLvkrJTiMmHWdV84wps9iOAhhbQKAR1FQ~peXBdVoBGtGklZtqKPHsh1~Np1m9MOyPgU4yxS9VXWdWr8bsOYJI4GwX65zQE3M1n~UgnMWsR-70pbMr3b9inZB7psk~EeDAX-C10beelBpxjwksBqp2AKGT~fsTYufj8h80NeWgaWOJs6XsSjd3iPK0hQwEsfozZCvpH-V7KS7fDd2XGc8RgbOoi28nRn96JeNircd-3Qo~Vw__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAIUCZBIA4LVPAVW3Q

June 29, 2017 at 8:15 am

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