Posts filed under ‘FIEBRE en el POSTOPERATORIO’

Traditional Laboratory Markers Hold Low Diagnostic Utility for Immunosuppressed Patients With Periprosthetic Joint Infections

Journal of Arthroplasty July 2019 V.34 N.7 P.1441–1445

Background

Although predictive laboratory markers and cutoffs for immunocompetent patients are well-studied, similar reference ranges and decision thresholds for immunosuppressed patients are less understood. We investigated the utility of typical laboratory markers in immunosuppressed patients undergoing aspiration of a prosthetic hip or knee joint.

Methods

A retrospective review of adult patients with an immunosuppressed state that underwent primary and revision total joint arthroplasty with a subsequent infection at our tertiary, academic institution was conducted. Infection was defined by Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria. A multivariable analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with acute (<90 days) and chronic (>90 days) infection. Area under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) was used to determine the best supported laboratory cut points for identifying infection.

Results

We identified 90 patients with immunosuppression states totaling 172 aspirations. Mean follow-up from aspiration was 33 months. In a multivariate analysis, only synovial fluid cell count and synovial percent neutrophils were found to be independently correlated with both acute and chronic infection. A synovial fluid cell count cutoff value of 5679 nucleated cells/mm3 maximized the AUC (0.839) for predicting acute infection, while a synovial fluid cell count cutoff value of 1293 nucleated cells/mm3 maximized the AUC (0.931) for predicting chronic infection.

Conclusion

Physicians should be aware of lower levels of synovial nucleated cell count and percentage of neutrophils in prosthetic joint infections of the hip or knee in patients with immunosuppression. Further investigation is necessary to identify the best means of diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection in this patient population.

FULL TEXT

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(19)30236-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(19)30236-0/pdf

Advertisements

August 30, 2019 at 4:10 pm

Fever and Erythema are Specific Findings in Detecting Infection Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

J Bone Jt Infect. March 16, 2019 V.4 B.2 P.92-98. doi: 10.7150/jbji.30088. eCollection 2019.

Shohat N1,2, Goswami K1, Tan TL1, Henstenburg B1, Makar G1, Rondon AJ1, Parvizi J1.

1 The Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107.

2 Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

Current diagnostic modalities are based almost exclusively on laboratory findings and the role of clinical presentation remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic value of clinical presentation in detecting periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). This study evaluated 279 patients undergoing revision surgery for failed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between 2001-2016. Patients were classified as undergoing septic revisions based on major MSIS criteria. Aseptic revisions were defined as cases of single stage revision that did not have suspected PJI, fulfill MSIS criteria, or subsequently fail within one year of follow-up. Clinical presentation included pain, fever, presence of joint effusion or erythema, and reduced range of motion. Serum and synovial laboratory markers were also evaluated. The diagnostic value of each test was assessed and a Fagan’s nomogram was constructed. A subset of MSIS-negative patients was used to demonstrate the value of various clinical presentations in detecting PJI. Post-test probability for infection was calculated taking into account clinical presentation together with serum and synovial markers. Our results show that fever and erythema are the most important signs for diagnosing PJI with a positive likelihood ratio (LR) of 10.78 and 8.08, respectively. Effusion had a LR of 2.42. Pain and reduced ROM were not as strongly correlated with PJI diagnosis; LR was 1.02 and 1.51. Of the 35 MSIS-negative patients treated for PJI, 33 had a post-test probability of infection greater than 90% when taking clinical presentation into account. Clinical presentation should be used to guide which future diagnostic tests should be ordered and in the interpretation of their results. Our results indicate that pain, fever, presence of joint effusion or erythema, and reduced range of motion should prompt further workup for infection. We propose a nomogram that may be used in interoperating their individual weight together with laboratory findings. Fever and erythema are highly specific findings in patients with PJI and future studies should assess whether they may be added as minor criteria to current definitions for infection.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6470654/pdf/jbjiv04p0092.pdf

August 28, 2019 at 3:52 pm

Streptococcus salivarius Prosthetic Joint Infection following Dental Cleaning despite Antibiotic Prophylaxis.

Case Rep Infect Dis. April 21, 2019   

Olson LB1, Turner DJ2, Cox GM3, Hostler CJ3,4.

Author information

1 Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA.

2 Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA.

3 Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

4 Infectious Disease Section, Durham VA Health Care System, Durham, USA.

Abstract

We present the case of a 92-year-old man with septic arthritis of a prosthetic hip joint due to Streptococcus salivarius one week following a high-risk dental procedure despite preprocedure amoxicillin. S. salivarius is a commensal bacterium of the human oral mucosa that is an uncommon cause of bacteremia. S. salivarius has previously been described as a causative agent of infective endocarditis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis but was only recently recognized as a cause of prosthetic joint infection. This case highlights the potential pathogenicity of a common commensal bacteria and the questionable utility of prophylactic antibiotics before dental procedures to prevent periprosthetic joint infections

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6501194/pdf/CRIID2019-8109280.pdf

August 9, 2019 at 8:26 am

“’The not-so good prognosis of streptococcal periprosthetic joint infection managed by implant retention: the results of a large multicenter study.”

Clinical Infectious Diseases June 15, 2017 V.64 N.12 P.1742–1752

Lora-Tomayo, ´E. Senneville, A. Ribera et al.,

BACKGROUND.

Streptococci are not an infrequent cause of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Management by debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention (DAIR) is thought to produce a good prognosis, but little is known about the real likelihood of success.

METHODS.

A retrospective, observational, multicenter, international study was performed during 2003-2012. Eligible patients had a streptococcal PJI that was managed with DAIR. The primary endpoint was failure, defined as death related to infection, relapse/persistence of infection, or the need for salvage therapy.

RESULTS.

Overall, 462 cases were included (median age 72 years, 50% men). The most frequent species was Streptococcus agalactiae (34%), and 52% of all cases were hematogenous. Antibiotic treatment was primarily using β-lactams, and 37% of patients received rifampin. Outcomes were evaluable in 444 patients: failure occurred in 187 (42.1%; 95% confidence interval, 37.5%-46.7%) after a median of 62 days from debridement; patients without failure were followed up for a median of 802 days. Independent predictors (hazard ratios) of failure were rheumatoid arthritis (2.36), late post-surgical infection (2.20), and bacteremia (1.69). Independent predictors of success were exchange of removable components (0.60), early use of rifampin (0.98 per day of treatment within the first 30 days), and long treatments (≥21 days) with β-lactams, either as monotherapy (0.48) or in combination with rifampin (0.34).

CONCLUSIONS.

This is the largest series to our knowledge of streptococcal PJI managed by DAIR, showing a worse prognosis than previously reported. The beneficial effects of exchanging the removable components and of β-lactams are confirmed and maybe also a potential benefit from adding rifampin.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/64/12/1742/3078956

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

August 9, 2019 at 8:25 am

Group B Streptococcus in surgical site and non-invasive bacterial infections worldwide: A systematic review and meta-analysis

International Journal of Infectious Diseases June 2019 V.83 P.116-129

Simon M. Collin, Nandini Shetty, Rebecca Guy, Victoria N. Nyaga, Ann Bull, Michael J. Richards, Tjallie I.I. van der Kooi, Mayke B.G. Koek, Mary De Almeida, Sally A. Roberts, Theresa Lamagni

Highlights

  • This review obtained data on group B Streptococcus infection from 67 countries.
  • Group B Streptococcus is implicated in a small proportion of non-invasive infections.
  • Group B Streptococcus causes 10% of caesarean section invasive surgical infections.

Objectives

The epidemiology of disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) outside pregnancy and the neonatal period is poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to quantify the role of GBS as a cause of surgical site and non-invasive infections at all ages.

Methods

A systematic review (PROSPERO CRD42017068914) and meta-analysis of GBS as a proportion (%) of bacterial isolates from surgical site infection (SSI), skin/soft tissue infection (SSTI), urinary tract infection (UTI), and respiratory tract infection (RTI) was conducted.

Results

Seventy-four studies and data sources were included, covering 67 countries. In orthopaedic surgery, GBS accounted for 0.37% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–1.68%), 0.87% (95% CI 0.33–2.28%), and 1.46% (95% CI 0.49–4.29%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI, respectively. GBS played a more significant role as a cause of post-caesarean section SSI, detected in 2.92% (95% CI 1.51–5.55%), 1.93% (95% CI 0.97–3.81%), and 9.69% (95% CI 6.72–13.8%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI. Of the SSTI isolates, 1.89% (95% CI 1.16–3.05%) were GBS. The prevalence of GBS in community and hospital UTI isolates was 1.61% (1.13–2.30%) and 0.73% (0.43–1.23%), respectively. GBS was uncommonly associated with RTI, accounting for 0.35% (95% CI 0.19–0.63%) of community and 0.27% (95% CI 0.15–0.48%) of hospital RTI isolates.

Conclusions

GBS is implicated in a small proportion of surgical site and non-invasive infections, but a substantial proportion of invasive SSI post-caesarean section.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/pdf

 

 

June 30, 2019 at 12:21 pm

Still fighting prosthetic joint infection after knee replacement

LANCET Infectous Diseases June 2019 V.19 N.6

COMMENT – Still fighting prosthetic joint infection after knee replacement

We congratulate Erik Lenguerrand and colleagues on the publication of their paper in The Lancet Infectious Diseases1 and respect that it is a well-conducted study. In their large-scale observational study, the authors collected data from the UK National Joint Registry including a total of 679 010 primary knee arthroplasty cases and evaluated associations between patient, surgical, and healthcare system factors and the risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest cohort study to date analysing the risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection following primary total knee replacement…

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(19)30067-2/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2819%2930067-2

 

 

LANCET Infectous Diseases June 2019 V.19 N.6

Risk factors associated with revision for prosthetic joint infection following knee replacement: an observational cohort study from England and Wales

Background

Prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication of knee replacement. The risk of developing a prosthetic joint infection is affected by patient, surgical, and health-care system factors. Existing evidence is limited by heterogeneity in populations studied, short follow-up, inadequate power, and does not differentiate early prosthetic joint infection, most likely related to the intervention, from late infection, more likely to occur due to haematogenous bacterial spread. We aimed to assess the overall and time-specific associations of these factors with the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection following primary knee replacement.

Methods

In this cohort study, we analysed primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales and the procedures subsequently revised for prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014. Data were obtained from the National Joint Registry linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics data in England and the Patient Episode Database for Wales. Each primary replacement was followed for a minimum of 12 months until the end of the observation period (Dec 31, 2014) or until the date of revision for prosthetic joint infection, revision for another indication, or death (whichever occurred first). We analysed the data using Poisson and piecewise exponential multilevel models to assess the associations between patient, surgical, and health-care system factors and risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection.

Findings

Of 679 010 primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales, 3659 were subsequently revised for an indication of prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014, after a median follow-up of 4·6 years (IQR 2·6–6·9). Male sex (rate ratio [RR] for male vs female patients 1·8 [95% CI 1·7–2·0]), younger age (RR for age ≥80 years vs <60 years 0·5 [0·4–0·6]), higher American Society of Anaesthesiologists [ASA] grade (RR for ASA grade 3–5 vs 1, 1·8 [1·6–2·1]), elevated body-mass index (BMI; RR for BMI ≥30 kg/m2 vs <25 kg/m2 1·5 [1·3–1·6]), chronic pulmonary disease (RR 1·2 [1·1–1·3]), diabetes (RR 1·4 [1·2–1·5]), liver disease (RR 2·2 [1·6–2·9]), connective tissue and rheumatic diseases (RR 1·5 [1·3–1·7]), peripheral vascular disease (RR 1·4 [1·1–1·7]), surgery for trauma (RR 1·9 [1·4–2·6]), previous septic arthritis (RR 4·9 [2·7–7·6]) or inflammatory arthropathy (RR 1·4 [1·2–1·7]), operation under general anaesthesia (RR 1·1 [1·0–1·2]), requirement for tibial bone graft (RR 2·0 [1·3–2·7]), use of posterior stabilised fixed bearing prostheses (RR for posterior stabilised fixed bearing prostheses vs unconstrained fixed bearing prostheses 1·4 [1·3–1·5]) or constrained condylar prostheses (3·5 [2·5–4·7]) were associated with a higher risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. However, uncemented total, patellofemoral, or unicondylar knee replacement (RR for uncemented vs cemented total knee replacement 0·7 [95% CI 0·6–0·8], RR for patellofemoral vs cemented total knee replacement 0·3 [0·2–0·5], and RR for unicondylar vs cemented total knee replacement 0·5 [0·5–0·6]) were associated with lower risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. Most of these factors had time-specific effects, depending on the time period post-surgery.

Interpretation

We have identified several risk factors for revision for prosthetic joint infection following knee replacement. Some of these factors are modifiable, and the use of targeted interventions or strategies could lead to a reduced risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection. Non-modifiable factors and the time-specific nature of the effects we have observed will allow clinicians to appropriately counsel patients preoperatively and tailor follow-up regimens.

Funding

National Institute for Health Research.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(18)30755- 2/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2818%2930755-2

May 24, 2019 at 7:39 am

REVISION – Difusión de los antibióticos en el sistema nervioso central

Revista Española de Quimioterapia Febrero 2018 V.31 N.1 P.1–12.

José María Cabrera-Maqueda,corresponding author1 Luna Fuentes Rumí,1 Gabriel Valero López,1 Ana Esther Baidez Guerrero,1 Estefanía García Molina,1 José Díaz Pérez,1 and Elisa García-Vázquez2

RESUMEN

Las infecciones del SNC causadas por patógenos mutiresistentes suponen un reto terapéutico. El paso de fluidos y de solutos al SNC está estrechamente regulado a través de la BHE.La penetración de cualquier fármaco, inclusive los ATB, en el LCR depende del tamaño molecular, la lipofilicidad, la unión a proteínas plasmáticas y su afinidad por transportadores de la BHE. La relación entre el área bajo la curva en el LCR y el suero AUCCSF (Area Bajo la Curva en LCR)/AUCS (Area Bajo la Curva en suero) de una sustancia es el parámetro más preciso para determinar su capacidad de difusión.

Linezolid, algunas quinolonas y metronidazol consiguen altas concentraciones en LCR y son útiles para tratar microorganismos sensibles. Algunos ATB cuya permeabilidad a través de la BHE es baja pueden ser administrados directamente en el ventrículo a la vez que se realiza infusión IV. El ATB ideal para tratar una infección del SNC es pequeño, no tiene alta tasa de unión a proteínas plasmáticas, es moderadamente lipofílico y no es un ligando de alta afinidad a bombas de expulsión de la BHE.

Conocer la farmacocinética de los ATB y su interacción con la BHE permitirá mejorar el tratamiento de los pacientes con infecciones del SNC. En este artículo se exponen las propiedades físico-químicas de los principales grupos de ATB para evaluar cuáles son más prometedores en el tratamiento de las infecciones del SNC y cómo usarlos en la práctica clínica habitual.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6159365/pdf/revespquimioter-31-1.pdf

May 19, 2019 at 7:13 pm

Older Posts


Calendar

September 2019
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category