Posts filed under ‘F.O.D’

Mycobacterium tuberculosis prosthetic joint infections: A case series and literature review

Journal of Infection January 2019 V.78 N.1 P.27–34

Fabrice Uhel, Gregory Corvaisier, Yves Poinsignon, Catherine Chirouze, Guillaume Beraud, Olivier Grossi, Nicolas Varache, Cédric Arvieux, Rozenn Le Berre, Pierre Tattevin, for the Groupe d’Epidémiologie et Recherche en Infectiologie Clinique Centre-Ouest (GERICCO)

Objectives

We aimed to characterize diagnosis, management, and outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis prosthetic joint infections (PJI).

Methods

Cases of M. tuberculosis PJI documented in 7 referral French centers were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected from medical files on a standardized questionnaire. We performed a literature review using the keywords ‘prosthetic joint’, and ‘tuberculosis’.

Results

During years 1997–2016, 13 patients (8 males, 5 females, median age 79 years [range, 60–86]) had documented M. tuberculosis PJI, involving hip (n = 6), knee (n = 6), or shoulder (n = 1). Median time from arthroplasty to diagnosis was 9 years [0.4–20]. The diagnosis was obtained on joint aspirates (n = 9), or synovial tissue (n = 4). PCR was positive in all cases tested (5/5). Median duration of antituberculosis treatment was 14 months [6–32]). Nine patients underwent surgery: debridement (n = 4), resection arthroplasty (n = 3), and revision arthroplasty (1-stage exchange, n = 2). PJI was controlled in 12 patients. Seventeen additional cases of documented M. tuberculosis PJI have been reported, with a favorable outcome in 79% (11/14) of patients with no surgery, 85% (11/13) with debridement, 86% (19/22) with revision arthroplasty, and 81% (17/21) with resection (NS).

Conclusions

  1. tuberculosis PJI can be controlled with prolonged antituberculosis treatment in most cases, with or without surgical treatment.

FULL TEXT

https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(18)30253-6/abstract

PDF

https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(18)30253-6/pdf

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January 12, 2019 at 10:01 am

Candida auris Sternal Osteomyelitis in a Man from Kenya Visiting Australia, 2015

Emerging Infectious Diseases January 2019 V.25  N.1

H. Heath et al.

In Australia in 2015, Candida auris sternal osteomyelitis was diagnosed in a 65-year-old man with a history of intensive care treatment in Kenya in 2012 and without a history of cardiac surgery.

The isolate was South Africa clade III.

Clinicians should note that C. auris can cause low-grade disease years after colonization.

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/1/pdfs/18-1321.pdf

December 26, 2018 at 3:48 pm

Clinical and Radiologic Characteristics of Human Metapneumovirus Infections in Adults, South Korea

Emerging Infectious Diseases January 2019 V.25  N.1

Koo et al.

Clinical features of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) infection have not been well documented for adults.

We investigated clinical and radiologic features of HMPV infection in 849 adults in a tertiary hospital in South Korea.

We classified patients into groups on the basis of underlying diseases:

immunocompetent patients,

solid tumor patients,

solid organ transplantation recipients,

hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients,

hematologic malignancy patients, and

patients receiving long-term steroid treatment.

Of 849 HMPV-infected patients, 756 had community-acquired infections, 579 had pneumonia, and 203 had infections with other pathogens.

Mortality rates were highest in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients (22% at 30 days).

Older age, current smoking, and underlying disease were associated with HMPV pneumonia.

Body mass index and an immunocompromised state were associated with 30-day mortality rates in HMPV-infected patients.

Bronchial wall thickening, ground-glass opacity, and ill-defined centrilobular nodules were common computed tomography findings for HMPV pneumonia.

Macronodules and consolidation were observed in <50% of patients.

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/1/pdfs/18-1131.pdf

December 26, 2018 at 3:45 pm

Multistate infestation with the exotic disease–vector tick Haemaphysalis longicornis — United States, August 2017–September 2018.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep November 30, 2018 V.67 N.47 P.1310-1313.

Beard CB et al

Haemaphysalis longicornis is a tick indigenous to eastern Asia and an important vector of human and animal disease agents, resulting in such outcomes as human hemorrhagic fever and reduction of production in dairy cattle by 25%.

H. longicornis was discovered on a sheep in New Jersey in August 2017 (1).

This was the first detection in the United States outside of quarantine.

In the spring of 2018, the tick was again detected at the index site, and later, in other counties in New Jersey, in seven other states in the eastern United States, and in Arkansas.

The hosts included six species of domestic animals, six species of wildlife, and humans.

To forestall adverse consequences in humans, pets, livestock, and wildlife, several critical actions are indicated, including expanded surveillance to determine the evolving distribution of H. longicornis, detection of pathogens that H. longicornis currently harbors, determination of the capacity of H. longicornis to serve as a vector for a range of potential pathogens, and evaluation of effective agents and methods for the control of H. longicornis ….

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/pdfs/mm6747a3-H.pdf

December 6, 2018 at 8:00 am

Radiological characteristics of pulmonary cryptococcosis in HIV-infected patients.

PLoS One. March 16, 2017 V.12 N.3 P.:e0173858.

Hu Z1, Chen J2, Wang J3, Xiong Q1, Zhong Y1, Yang Y1, Xu C4, Wei H1.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated pulmonary cryptococcosis (PC) is largely based on studies performed about 2 decades ago which reported that the most common findings on chest radiograph were diffuse interstitial infiltrates. Few studies are available regarding the computed tomography (CT) findings. The aim of this study was to characterize chest CT features of HIV-associated PC.

METHODS:

HIV patients with cryptococccal infection and pulmonary abnormalities on Chest CT between September 2010 and May 2016 in the Second Affiliated Hospital of the Southeast University were retrospectively analyzed. Confirmed cases of tumors, mycobacterial infections and other fungal infections were excluded from the analysis.

RESULTS:

60 cases were identified. The median CD4 T-cell counts were 20 cells/μL (range, 0-205 cells/μL). Chest CT scans demonstrated nodular lesions in 93.3% of the studied patients. Those nodular lesions were usually cavitated and solitary nodule was the most common form. Pleural effusions and pneumonic infiltrates occurred in 11.6% and 31.7% of the cases respectively. Those lesions were usually had co-existing nodular lesions. Etiological analysis suggested that 76.8% of the nodular lesions could have a relationship with PC that 12.5% of the nodular lesions were “laboratory-confirmed” cases, 48.2% were “clinically confirmed” cases and 16.1% were “clinically probable” cases. 85.7% of the pleural effusions could be “clinically confirmed” cases of PC. At least, 38.5% of the diffuse pneumonic infiltrates may be clinically attributed to pneumocystis pneumonia.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggested that pulmonary nodules but not diffuse pneumonia are the most common radiological characteristics of HIV-associated PC. HIV-infected patients with pulmonary nodules on Chest CT should particularly be screened for cryptococcal infection

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5354418/pdf/pone.0173858.pdf

November 25, 2018 at 9:40 am

Pulmonary Cryptococcosis – Localized and Disseminated Infections in 27 Patients with AIDS.

Clinical Infectious Diseases September 1995 V.21 N.3 P.628–633

Marie-Caroline Meyohas; Patricia Roux; Diane Bollens; Christos Chouaid; Willy Rozenbaum …

We reviewed the records of 85 patients infected with both human immunodeficiency virus and Cryptococcus neoformans.

Twenty-seven patients (32%) had pulmonary cryptococcosis.

C. neoformans was cultured from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or pleural fluid in 25 cases; the remaining two patients had cryptococcal antigen (CA) detected in BAL fluid and C. neoformans cultured from other sites.

All but one of the 27 patients had detectable CA in serum.

The CD4+ lymphocyte count was low in all cases (median, 24/mm3). Clinical manifestations of pulmonary cryptococcosis included fever (94%), cough (71%), dyspnea (7%), expectoration (4%), chest pain (2%), and hemoptysis (1%).

Diffuse interstitial opacities (70.5%), focal interstitial abnormalities, alveolar opacities, adenopathies, cavitary lesions, and pleural effusions were evident.

Outcome was poor (mean survival time, 23 weeks) despite treatment.

Patients with localized pulmonary cryptococcosis appeared to have a higher CD4+ lymphocyte count, an earlier diagnosis, lower serum CA titers, fewer previous or concomitant infections, and a better prognosis than patients with disseminated cryptococcosis.

abstract

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-abstract/21/3/628/362645?redirectedFrom=fulltext

PDF

https://doi.org/10.1093/clinids/21.3.628

 

November 24, 2018 at 8:03 pm

Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection in HIV-1-Infected Patients

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome May 1990 V.3  N.5 P.480-484

Clark, Rebecca A.; Greer, Donald L.; Valainis, Gregory T…..

Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a frequent pathogen in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1).

We review the initial presentation and clinical course of 18 HIV-1-infected (HIV +) patients with a Cn pulmonary infection. Simultaneous positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures were found in 10 (63%) of 16 examined.

The most frequent presenting symptoms were fever (87%) and pulmonary complaints (60%).

Although the most common chest radiographic finding was bilateral diffuse interstitial infiltrates, nodules and cavitary lesions were also seen. Nine (50%) of the 18 patients died within 6 weeks of diagnosis.

Of six patients with an isolated Cn pulmonary infection, five have subsequently died.

Three of these five patients did not receive maintenance therapy and had confirmed or probable relapse.

Patients initially presenting with an isolated Cn pulmonary infection may later show disseminated disease, suggesting that such patients should receive both acute and maintenance therapy.

abstract

https://journals.lww.com/jaids/Abstract/1990/05000/Cryptococcus_neoformans_Pulmonary_Infection_in.3.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

November 24, 2018 at 8:01 pm

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