Posts filed under ‘F.O.D’

From Expert Protocols to Standardized Management of Infectious Diseases

Clinical Infectious Diseases  15 August 2017  V.65 N.suppl 1 S12–S19

Jean-Christophe Lagier; Camille Aubry; Marion Delord; Pierre Michelet; Hervé Tissot-Dupont …

We report here 4 examples of management of infectious diseases (IDs) at the University Hospital Institute Méditerranée Infection in Marseille, France, to illustrate the value of expert protocols feeding standardized management of IDs.

First, we describe our experience on Q fever and Tropheryma whipplei infection management based on in vitro data and clinical outcome.

Second, we describe our management-based approach for the treatment of infective endocarditis, leading to a strong reduction of mortality rate.

Third, we report our use of fecal microbiota transplantation to face severe Clostridium difficile infections and to perform decolonization of patients colonized by emerging highly resistant bacteria.

Finally, we present the standardized management of the main acute infections in patients admitted in the emergency department, promoting antibiotics by oral route, checking compliance with the protocol, and avoiding the unnecessary use of intravenous and urinary tract catheters.

Overall, the standardization of the management is the keystone to reduce both mortality and morbidity related to IDs.

PDF

https://oup.silverchair-cdn.com/oup/backfile/Content_public/Journal/cid/65/suppl_1/10.1093_cid_cix403/3/cix403.pdf?Expires=1502372492&Signature=LVAbXU3YuwNx~UkUFnKvXaFmayq1aLSWpor6xnVqc2jGiKuNc69M1UqI4xbuqSgRoOKoPhupwLOXRmDGZRMNfu1ydEj9NXbJnqvpBSeWUzfnWw~jYh2w3Y37B92GZwGPSe4XelatYtvhE7i8mqlvzzKKpL2cpkgYhApfvdGjdPIJ-cWZCHuU8dzEdHMOzmEjV-sJI1rBrwSqK4XlRyFojeLEKx5yBZxDukcIP2GQbPvbL1BYugZA~MAyA8mGR2GpExfsI14HZhD4mnTkj9UwjfA63wbptXdFn8jPuhfRCDI6Q52VtmEonPn~V4RR88mRqcV~l63vhtFfzysOXOk83A__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAIUCZBIA4LVPAVW3Q

August 9, 2017 at 8:50 am

Polymerase Chain Reaction – An Important Tool for Early Diagnosis of Leptospirosis Cases.

J Clin Diagn Res. 2016 Dec;10(12):DC08-DC11.
Mullan S1, Panwala TH2.
Author information
1 Professor and Head, Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College , Surat, Gujarat, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College , Surat, Gujarat, India
Abstract
INTRODUCTION:
Various diagnostic methods like Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT), IgM ELISA, Isolation of Leptospira from the clinical specimen, Rapid leptocheck tests etc., are available for diagnosis of leptospirosis. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is used for diagnosis of various diseases of infectious origin including leptospirosis but there is paucity of data about comparison of PCR with other available method of diagnosis of leptospirosis.
AIM:
The aim of the study was to detect the leptospiral DNA by PCR method and to compare the results of PCR with other available diagnostic methods used for diagnosis of suspected leptospirosis cases in acute phase of illness.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
A total of 207 blood samples were obtained from suspected patients of leptospirosis admitted in New Civil Hospital, a tertiary care hospital in South Gujarat, during the period of July 2008 to November 2008. These blood samples were subjected to Rapid leptocheck, IgM ELISA, MAT test to detect (IgG or IgM) antibody level, Leptospira culture and PCR.
RESULTS:
In early phase of the disease, Rapid leptocheck test gave 44% detection, but along with PCR seropositivity reached upto 71%. Detection rate by IgM ELISA was 59% which increased to 80% with PCR. By MAT seropositivity was 57% but combined seropositivity of MAT with PCR was 78%. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR as compared to MAT (Gold standard) was 52% and 79% respectively. Leptospira was not growing in culture.
CONCLUSION:
In present study, PCR picked up to 50% of cases which were negative by other serological tests so these finding suggest that PCR should be used routinely in acute phase of disease.
PDF
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5296427/pdf/jcdr-10-DC08.pdf

August 4, 2017 at 6:51 pm

Moraxella osloensis peritonitis : Case report and review.

Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Jun;29(3):161-3.

[Article in Spanish]

Hernández-Egido S1, Puerta-Mateo A, Cores-Calvo O, Ruiz-Ferraras E.

Author information

1 Sara Hernández Egido, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca Paseo de San Vicente nº 58-182 C.P. 37007 Salamanca, Spain. sathassa@hotmail.com.

PDF

http://seq.es/seq/0214-3429/29/3/hernandez26mar2016.pdf

August 2, 2017 at 4:20 pm

Moraxella osloensis, an emerging pathogen of endocarditis in immunocompromised patients?

Swiss Med Wkly. 2015 Sep 16;145:w14185.

Gagnard JC1, Hidri N2, Grillon A3, Jesel L4, Denes E5.

Author information

1 Infectious Diseases Department, Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.

2 Bacteriology Laboratory, Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.

3 Bacteriology Laboratory, Strasbourg Teaching Hospital, France.

4 Cardiology Department, Strasbourg Teaching Hospital, France.

5 CHU Dupuytren, 2 Ave Martin Luther King, LIMOGES, FRANCE.

Abstract

We report two cases of endocarditis due to Moraxella osloensis. Only one previous case of such infection has been described.

These infections occurred in immunocompromised patients (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and kidney graft associated with Hodgkin’s disease) and both patients had a favourable outcome with a complete cure of their infectious endocarditis.

This bacterium could be an emerging pathogen revealed by MALDI-TOF. Indeed, its characterisation within the Moraxella group by use of biochemistry-based methods is difficult.

Moreover, this strain could be particularly involved in immunocompromised patients.

FULL TEXT

https://smw.ch/article/doi/smw.2015.14185

August 2, 2017 at 4:17 pm

Risk Factors for 30-Day Mortality in Patients with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

International Journal of Infectious Diseases August 2017 V.60 N.8 P.3-6

Pedro Ayau, Ana C. Bardossy, Guillermo Sanchez, Ricardo Ortiz, Daniela Moreno, Pamela Hartman, Khulood Rizvi, Tyler C. Prentiss, Mary B. Perri, Meredith Mahan, Vanthida Huang, Katherine Reyes, Marcus J. Zervos

Highlights

  • The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with 30-day mortality in patients with MRSA BSI.
  • 1,168 patients with confirmed MRSA BSI were identified over a 9-year period in which 30-day all-cause mortality was 16%.
  • There was no significant variability in 30-day mortality over our 9-year study period.
  • Our study showed that age, cancer, heart disease, neurologic disease, nursing home residence and Charlson score >3 are risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients with MRSA BSI.
  • Diabetes, PVD and readmission because of infection have statistically significant protective effects on 30-day mortality

Objectives

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood stream infections (BSI) are a major health care problem accounting for a large percentage of nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with 30-day mortality in patients with MRSA BSI.

Methods

This was a retrospective study performed in Southeast Michigan. Over a 9- year period, a total of 1,168 patients were identified with MRSA BSI. Patient demographics and clinical data were retrieved and evaluated using electronic medical health records.

Results

30-day mortality during the 9-year study period was 16%. Significant risk factors for 30-day mortality were age, cancer, heart disease, neurologic disease, nursing home residence and Charlson score >3 with Odds Ratio (OR) of 1.03 (CI 1.02–1.04), 2.29 (CI 1.40–3.75), 1.78 (CI 1.20–2.63), 1.65 (CI 1.08–2.25), 1.66 (CI 1.02 − 2.70) and 1.86 (CI 1.18 − 2.95) correspondingly. Diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), and readmission were protective factors for 30-day mortality with OR of 0.53 (CI 0.36–0.78), 0.46 (CI 0.26–0.84) and 0.13 (CI0.05 − 0.32) respectively.

Conclusions

Our study identified significant risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients with MRSA BSI. Interestingly, diabetes mellitus, PVD and readmission were protective effects on 30-day mortality. There was no statistically significant variability in 30-day mortality over the 9-year study period.

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30146-7/pdf

July 30, 2017 at 12:57 pm

Changing patterns in leptospirosis: a three-decade study in Brazil

International Journal of Infectious Diseases July 2017 V.60 N.7 P.4-10

Elizabeth De Francesco Daher, Gabriela Studart Galdino de Carvalho, Douglas de Sousa Soares, Matheus Henrique Mendes, Sérgio Luiz Arruda Parente Filho, Hermano Alexandre Lima Rocha, Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

Background

This study was conducted to investigate changes in the clinical pattern of leptospirosis over time, analyzing its clinical and laboratory presentations in a metropolitan city of Brazil.

Method

This was a retrospective study including all patients with leptospirosis admitted to tertiary care hospitals in Fortaleza in the northeast of Brazil, between 1985 and 2015. Patients were divided into three groups according to the year of hospital admission: group I for the years 1985–1995, group II for 1996–2005, and group III for 2006–2015. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were compared between the groups.

Results

A total of 507 patients were included. Their mean age was 37.3 ± 15.9 years and 82.4% were male. The mean time between symptom onset and admission was 7 ± 4 days. There was a linear decrease in the levels of serum urea (190.1 ± 92.7, 135 ± 79.5, and 95.6 ± 73.3 mg/dl, respectively, p < 0.0001) and creatinine (5.8 ± 2.9, 3.8 ± 2.6, and 3.0 ± 2.5 mg/dl, respectively, p < 0.0001) in each decade, while levels of hemoglobin (10.31 ± 1.9, 10.8 ± 2.0, and 11.5 ± 2.1 g/dl, respectively, p < 0.0001) and platelets (57.900 ± 52.650, 80.130 ± 68.836, and 107.101 ± 99.699 × 109/l, respectively, p < 0.0001) increased. There was a tendency towards a linear decrease in mortality (22%, 14%, and 11.6%, respectively, p = 0.060).

Conclusions

Leptospirosis showed significant changes over time in this region. The main changes point to a decrease in disease severity and complications, such as acute kidney injury. Mortality has decreased, being close to 11%.

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30135-2/pdf

July 30, 2017 at 12:47 pm

Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

MMWR Recomm Rep. 2002 Aug 9;51(RR-10):1-29.

O’Grady NP1, Alexander M, Dellinger EP, Gerberding JL, Heard SO, Maki DG, Masur H, McCormick RD, Mermel LA, Pearson ML, Raad II, Randolph A, Weinstein RA.

Author information

1 National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

These guidelines have been developed for practitioners who insert catheters and for persons responsible for surveillance and control of infections in hospital, outpatient, and home health-care settings.

This report was prepared by a working group comprising members from professional organizations representing the disciplines of critical care medicine, infectious diseases, health-care infection control, surgery anesthesiology interventional radiology pulmonary medicine, pediatric medicine, and nursing.

The working group was led by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA), Society for Healthcare Epidemiology ofAmerica (SHEA), Surgical Infection Society (SIS), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), American Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists (ASCCA), Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), Infusion Nurses Society (INS), Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (SCVIR), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and is intended to replace the Guideline for Prevention of Intravascular Device-Related Infections published in 1996 These guidelines are intended to provide evidence-based recommendations for preventing catheter-related infections.

Major areas of emphasis include

1) educating and training health-care providers who insert and maintain catheters;

2) using maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion;

3) using a 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis;

4) avoiding routine replacement of central venous catheters as a strategy to prevent infection; and

5) using antiseptic/antibiotic impregnated short-term central venous catheters if the rate of infection is high despite adherence to other strategies (i.e., education and training, maximal sterile barrier precautions, and 2% chlorhexidine for skin antisepsis).

These guidelines also identify performance indicators that can be used locally by health-care institutions or organizations to monitor their success in implementing these evidence-based recommendations.

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5110.pdf

ERRATUM

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5132.pdf

July 26, 2017 at 4:47 pm

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