Posts filed under ‘GUIDELINES’

Neumonía adquirida en la comunidad – Guía práctica elaborada por un comité intersociedades

Medicina (B. Aires) Julio/Agosto 2003 V.63 N.4

Luna C. M.1, Calmaggi A.2, Caberloto O.1, Gentile J.2, Valentín R.1, 3, Ciruzzi J.1 , Clara L.2, Rizzo O.1, Lasdica S.1, 3, Blumenfeld M.2, Benchetrit G.2, Famiglietti A.4, ApezteguIa C.1, 3, Monteverde A.1 y Grupo Argentino de Estudio de la NAC

1 Asociación Argentina de Medicina Respiratoria (AAMR),

2 Sociedad Argentina de Infectología (SADI),

3 Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva (SATI),

4 Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología Clínica (SADEBAC), Asociación Argentina de Microbiología (AAM),

5 Sociedad Argentina de Virología (SAV),

6 Sociedad Argentina de Medicina (SAM), Buenos Aires

Resumen

Las guías para neumonía adquirida en la comunidad (NAC) contribuyen a ordenar el manejo de los pacientes. La NAC presenta cambios en su etiología, epidemiología y sensibilidad a antibióticos que obligan a la revisión periódica de las guías. Un comité intersociedades elaboró esta guía dividida en tópicos y basada en guías y estudios clínicos recientes. La NAC afecta anualmente al 1% de la población; la mayoría de los pacientes requiere atención ambulatoria, en otros reviste gravedad (representa la 6ª causa de muerte en Argentina). La etiología es diferente si el paciente es ambulatorio, requiere internación en sala general o en terapia intensiva, pero no hay forma segura de predecirla clínicamente. Los predictores de mala evolución son: edad, antecedentes personales y comorbilidades y hallazgos del examen físico, del laboratorio y de la radiografía de tórax.  Entre 10 y 25% de los pacientes que se internan deben hacerlo en terapia intensiva para ventilación mecánica o soporte hemodinámico (NAC grave), tanto inicialmente como durante su evolución. Estos pacientes presentan alta mortalidad; algunos criterios ayudan a reconocerlos. Embarazo, EPOC e internación en institutos geriátricos requieren consideraciones especiales. El diagnóstico es clínico, los métodos complementarios ayudan a determinar la etiología y la gravedad: la radiografía de tórax debe practicarse en todos los pacientes; el resto de los estudios están indicados en internados. El tratamiento inicial es empírico y debe iniciarse precozmente usando antibióticos activos frente a los gérmenes blanco, evitando el uso inapropiado que induce el desarrollo de resistencias. El tratamiento no debe prolongarse innecesariamente. Hidratación, nutrición, oxígeno y el manejo de las complicaciones complementan al tratamiento antibiótico. La prevención se basa en la profilaxis antinfluenza y antineumocóccica, evitar la aspiración y medidas generales.

PDF

http://www.scielo.org.ar/pdf/medba/v63n4/v63n4a09.pdf

March 22, 2017 at 3:46 pm

Prevention and Control of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Primary and Community Care – Partial Update of NICE Clinical Guideline 2. March 2012 220 pags

Editors: National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Source: London: Royal College of Physicians (UK)

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence: Guidance.

Excerpt

Since the publication of the NICE clinical guideline on the prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) in primary and community care in 2003, many changes have occurred within the NHS that place the patient firmly at the centre of all activities.

First, the NHS Constitution for England defines the rights and pledges that every patient can expect regarding their care.

To support this, the Care Quality Commission (CQC), the independent regulator of all health and adult social care in England, ensures that health and social care is safe, and monitors how providers comply with established standards.

In addition, the legal framework that underpins the guidance has changed since 2003.

New guidance is needed to reflect the fact that, as a result of the rapid turnover of patients in acute care settings, complex care is increasingly being delivered in the community.

New standards for the care of patients and the management of devices to prevent related healthcare-associated infections are needed that will also reinforce the principles of asepsis.

This clinical guideline is a partial update of ‘Infection control: prevention of healthcare-associated infection in primary and community care’ (NICE clinical guideline 2; 2003), and addresses areas in which clinical practice for preventing HCAI in primary and community care has changed, where the risk of HCAI is greatest or where the evidence has changed.

The Guideline Development Group (GDG) recognise the important contribution that surveillance makes to monitoring infection, but it is not within the scope of this guideline to make specific recommendations about this subject.

Where high-quality evidence is lacking, the GDG has highlighted areas for further research.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0050773/pdf/PubMedHealth_PMH0050773.pdf

March 15, 2017 at 8:50 am

Diagnosis and Management of CAP in Adults.

Am Fam Physician. 2011 Jun 1;83(11):1299-1306.

RICHARD R. WATKINS, MD, MS, Akron General Medical Center, Akron, Ohio

TRACY L. LEMONOVICH, MD, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is diagnosed by clinical features (e.g., cough, fever, pleuritic chest pain) and by lung imaging, usually an infiltrate seen on chest radiography. Initial evaluation should determine the need for hospitalization versus outpatient management using validated mortality or severity prediction scores. Selected diagnostic laboratory testing, such as sputum and blood cultures, is indicated for inpatients with severe illness but is rarely useful for outpatients. Initial outpatient therapy should include a macrolide or doxycycline. For outpatients with comorbidities or who have used antibiotics within the previous three months, a respiratory fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin, gemifloxacin, or moxifloxacin), or an oral beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide should be used. Inpatients not admitted to an intensive care unit should receive a respiratory fluoroquinolone, or a beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide.

Patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia or who are admitted to the intensive care unit should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic, plus azithromycin or a respiratory fluoroquinolone. Those with risk factors for Pseudomonas should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic (piperacillin/tazobactam, imipenem/cilastatin, meropenem, doripenem, or cefepime), plus an aminoglycoside and azithromycin or an antipseudomonal fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin). Those with risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus should be given vancomycin or linezolid. Hospitalized patients may be switched from intravenous to oral antibiotics after they have clinical improvement and are able to tolerate oral medications, typically in the first three days. Adherence to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Physicians should promote pneumococcal and influenza vaccination as a means to prevent community-acquired pneumonia and pneumococcal bacteremia.

PDF

http://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0601/p1299.pdf

 

February 28, 2017 at 9:09 am

Guidelines for management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

Medicina (B Aires). 2015;75(4):245-57.

[Article in Spanish]

Lopardo G1, Basombrío A, Clara L, Desse J, De Vedia L, Di Libero E, Gañete M, López Furst MJ, Mykietiuk A, Nemirovsky C, Osuna C, Pensotti C, Scapellato P.

Author information

1Sociedad Argentina de Infectología, Buenos Aires, Argentina. E-mail: glopardo@intramed.net

Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia in adults is a common cause of morbidity and mortality particularly in the elderly and in patients with comorbidities. Most episodes are of bacterial origin, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently isolated pathogen. Epidemiological surveillance provides information about changes in microorganisms and their susceptibility. In recent years there has been an increase in cases caused by community-acquired meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Legionella sp. The chest radiograph is essential as a diagnostic tool. CURB-65 score and pulse oximetry allow stratifying patients into those who require outpatient care, general hospital room or admission to intensive care unit. Diagnostic studies and empirical antimicrobial therapy are also based on this stratification. The use of biomarkers such as procalcitonin or C-reactive protein is not part of the initial evaluation because its use has not been shown to modify the initial approach. We recommend treatment with amoxicillin for outpatients under 65 year old and without comorbidities, for patients 65 years or more or with comorbidities amoxicillin-clavulanic/sulbactam, for patients hospitalized in general ward ampicillin-sulbactam with or without the addition of clarithromycin, and for patients admitted to intensive care unit ampicillin-sulbactam plus clarithromycin. Suggested treatment duration is 5 to 7 days for outpatients and 7 to 10 for those who are hospitalized. During the influenza season addition of oseltamivir for hospitalized patients and for those with comorbidities is suggested.

PDF

http://www.medicinabuenosaires.com/PMID/26339883.pdf

February 18, 2017 at 8:42 am

Diagnosis and management of prosthetic joint infection: clinical practice guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America

Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(1):e1-e25.

Osmon DR1, Berbari EF, Berendt AR, Lew D, Zimmerli W, Steckelberg JM, Rao N, Hanssen A, Wilson WR; Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Author information

1Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. osmon.douglas@mayo.edu

Abstract

These guidelines are intended for use by infectious disease specialists, orthopedists, and other healthcare professionals who care for patients with prosthetic joint infection (PJI). They include evidence-based and opinion-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with PJI treated with debridement and retention of the prosthesis, resection arthroplasty with or without subsequent staged reimplantation, 1-stage reimplantation, and amputation.

PDF

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/56/1/e1.full.pdf

February 14, 2017 at 8:09 am

Meningoencefalitis Amebiana Primaria (Amebas de Vida Libre) – Septiembre 2012

Direccion Nacional de Epidemiología – Secretaría de Salud de Mexico

Manual de Procedimientos Estandarizados para la Vigilancia Epidemiológica

ÍNDICE

Introducción …………………………………………………………11

Marco Legal ………………………………………………………….12

Justificación ………………………………………………………….12

Objetivos Generales ……………………………………………….12

Mecanismos de Vigilancia Epidemiológica ……………….13

Metodologías y Procedimientos para la Vigilancia Epidemiológica ……………………………………………………………………………. 13

Factores de Riesgo …………………………………………………14

La Vigilancia Epidemiológica ………………………………….14

Acciones y Funciones de Vigilancia Epidemiológica …. 15

Indicadores de Evaluación de Meningoencefalitis Amebiana Primaria…………………………………………………………………18

Procedimientos de Laboratorio ………………………………..19

Análisis de la Información ……………………………………….22

Colaboración Interinstitucional ……………………………….24

Difusión de la Información ……………………………………..27

Capacitación ………………………………………………………….27

Supervisión ……………………………………………………………28

Bibliografía ……………………………………………………………29

Anexos …………………………………………………………………..31

 

PDF

http://www.epidemiologia.salud.gob.mx/doctos/infoepid/vig_epid_manuales/16_2012_Manual_Meningoencefalitis_vFinal_7nov12.pdf

February 13, 2017 at 8:43 am

Guía de práctica clínica sobre el uso de las pruebas de liberación de interferón-γ para el diagnóstico de TBC

Enf Inf & Microb Clinica Mayo 2016 V.34 N.05 e1-e13

Consensus statement

Miguel Santin, José-María García-García, José Domínguez

a Service of Infectious Diseases, Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain

b Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

c Clinical Unit of Pneumology, Hospital San Agustín, Avilés, Asturias, Spain

d Service of Microbiology, Research Institute Trias i Pujol, Hospital Gremans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, Spain

e Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

f CIBER Respiratory Diseases, Madrid, Spain

Introducción

Las técnicas de detección in vitro de interferón-gamma (IGRA, del inglés interferon-gamma release assays) están ampliamente implantadas para el diagnóstico de infección tuberculosa en países de baja prevalencia. Sin embargo, no hay consenso sobre su aplicación. El objetivo fue desarrollar una guía de práctica clínica para el uso de los IGRA en los diferentes escenarios clínicos en España.

Métodos

Un grupo de expertos compuesto por especialistas en enfermedades infecciosas, enfermedades respiratorias, microbiología, pediatría y medicina preventiva, junto con un metodólogo formularon las preguntas clínicas y los desenlaces de interés, llevaron a cabo una búsqueda sistemática de la literatura, sintetizaron la evidencia y graduaron su calidad, y formularon las recomendaciones siguiendo la metodología Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations (GRADE).

Resultados

El grupo de trabajo formuló las recomendaciones sobre el uso de los IGRA para el diagnóstico de infección tuberculosa en el estudio de contactos (adultos y niños), trabajadores sanitarios, pacientes inmunosuprimidos (pacientes infectados por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana, pacientes afectos de enfermedades inflamatorias inmunomediadas candidatos a terapias biológicas y pacientes que requieren trasplante de órganos), y en el diagnóstico de enfermedad tuberculosa activa. La mayor parte de las recomendaciones fueron débiles, principalmente debido a la falta de evidencia de calidad para establecer un balance entre beneficios y daños de los IGRA en comparación con la prueba de la tuberculina.

Conclusión

Este documento proporciona una guía basada en la evidencia para el uso de los IGRA en el diagnóstico de infección tuberculosa en pacientes en riesgo de tuberculosis o con sospecha de enfermedad activa. Esta guía es aplicable en la atención especializada y primaria, y salud pública.

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90452011&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=22&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=en&fichero=28v34n05a90452011pdf001.pdf

 

February 11, 2017 at 7:21 pm

Older Posts


Calendar

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Feb    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category