Posts filed under ‘GUIDELINES’

Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure — United States, 2016

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65(Early Release):1–6

Update

Titilope Oduyebo, MD; Emily E. Petersen, MD; Sonja A. Rasmussen, MD; et al.

CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak. This update also expands guidance to women of reproductive age who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission.

FULL TEXT

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6505e2er.htm?s_cid=mm6505e2er_e

PDF

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/pdfs/mm6505e2er.pdf

February 5, 2016 at 2:27 pm

Association between Regimen Composition and Treatment Response in Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: A Prospective Cohort Study

PLOS Medicine December 29, 2015

Courtney M. Yuen, Ekaterina V. Kurbatova, Thelma Tupasi, Janice Campos Caoili, Martie Van Der Walt, Charlotte Kvasnovsky, Martin Yagui, Jaime Bayona, Carmen Contreras, Vaira Leimane, Julia Ershova, Laura E. Via, HeeJin Kim

World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) recommend a regimen consisting of at least four second-line drugs that are likely to be effective as well as pyrazinamide [1]. In the absence of drug susceptibility testing (DST) results for a patient’s isolate, likely effectiveness is determined based on previous exposure to a drug, background resistance levels to that drug in the community, and, in patients who were contacts to other known cases, DST results for an associated case. Furthermore, the guidelines indicate that only marginal benefit has been observed for regimens based directly on the DST results for a patient’s isolate [1].

A meta-analysis of cohort studies of patients with MDR TB reported that in vitro susceptibility to individual drugs was consistently and statistically significantly associated with higher odds of treatment success compared to in vitro resistance, suggesting clinical utility for DST in regimen design [2]. In addition, the use of baseline DST results to design individualized regimens involving prolonged use of five or more drugs with likely effectiveness has been associated with decreased risks of treatment failure, death, and relapse among patient cohorts in Peru and the Russian Federation [3–5]. Together, this evidence suggests the need to reassess both the role of DST in regimen design as well as the potential benefit of including more drugs in MDR TB regimens….

FULL TEXT

http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1001932

PDF

http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001932&representation=PDF

February 5, 2016 at 9:18 am

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older — United States, 2016

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:88–90

David K. Kim, MD; Carolyn B. Bridges, MD; Kathleen H. Harriman, PhD; et al.

In October 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)* approved the Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older, United States, 2016. This schedule provides a summary of ACIP recommendations for the use of vaccines routinely recommended for adults aged 19 years or older in two figures, footnotes for each vaccine, and a table that describes primary contraindications and precautions for commonly used vaccines for adults. Although the figures in the adult immunization schedule illustrate recommended vaccinations that begin at age 19 years, the footnotes contain information on vaccines that are recommended for adults that may begin at age younger than age 19 years. The footnotes also contain vaccine dosing, intervals between doses, and other important information and should be read with the figures.

PDF

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/pdfs/mm6504a5.pdf

February 4, 2016 at 7:04 pm

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years — United States, 2016

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:86–7

Candice L. Robinson, MD; Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), ACIP Child/Adolescent Immunization Work Group.

Each year, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)* reviews the recommended immunization schedules for persons aged 0 through 18 years to ensure that the schedules reflect current recommendations for Food and Drug Administration-licensed vaccines. In October 2015, ACIP approved the recommended immunization schedules for persons aged 0 through 18 years for 2016; the 2016 schedules include several changes from the 2015 immunization schedules. For 2016, the figures, footnotes, and tables will be published on the CDC immunization schedule website (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html). This provides readers electronic access to the most current version of the schedules and footnotes on the CDC website. Health care providers are advised to use figures, tables, and the combined footnotes together. Printable versions of the 2016 immunization schedules for persons aged 0 through 18 years in several formats (e.g., portrait, landscape, and pocket-sized versions) and ordering instructions for laminated versions and “parent-friendly” schedules are available at the immunization schedule website.

PDF

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/pdfs/mm6504a4.pdf

February 4, 2016 at 7:03 pm

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older: United States, 2016

Annals of Internal Medicie February 02, 2016 V.164 N.3

Clinical Guidelines

David K. Kim, MD; Carolyn B. Bridges, MD; Kathleen H. Harriman, PhD, MPH, RN, on behalf of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

In October 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule: United States, 2016.

This schedule summarizes ACIP recommendations for the use of vaccines routinely recommended for adults in 2 figures (Figures 1 and 2), footnotes for each vaccine, and a table that describes primary contraindications and precautions for commonly used vaccines for adults (Table).

Details on these updates and information on other vaccines recommended for adults can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules.

The full ACIP recommendations for each vaccine are not included in the schedule owing to space limitations but can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/index.html.

The 2016 adult immunization schedule was reviewed and approved by the American College of Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and American College of Nurse-Midwives….

abstract

http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleID=2484895

PDF (CLIC on PDF)

February 3, 2016 at 7:28 am

DENGUE – GUIA para el Equipo de Salud – Ministerio Salud Nación Argentina DIC. 2015 4ta Edición

 

Contenido:

Información para el equipo de salud

  1. Introducción
  2. Manifestaciones clínicas
  3. ¿Cuándo sospechar dengue?
  4. ¿Cómo se clasifica el caso sospechoso de dengue?
  5. ¿Cómo se confirma el dengue?
  6. ¿Cómo se trata el paciente con dengue?
  7. Flujograma de manejo de casos sospechosos
  8. ¿Qué se debe hacer si se confirma caso sospechoso de dengue?
  9. ¿Cómo notificar el caso de dengue?
  10. Prevención de dengue en la familia y la comunidad

 

Recomendaciones para la organización de las actividades en el Equipo de Salud

  1. ¿Qué pueden Ud. y su equipo de salud hacer para contribuir al control del dengue en su área?

 

Información para la población

  1. ¿Qué es el dengue?
  2. ¿Cómo se contagia?
  3. ¿Qué puedo hacer para prevenir el dengue?
  4. ¿Cómo puedo saber si tengo dengue?
  5. ¿Hay algún tratamiento?

 

Anexos

  1. Dengue perinatal
  2. Hemocomponentes
  3. Solución Polielectrolítica
  4. Diagnóstico diferencial del dengue
  5. Ficha de Notificación de Síndrome Febril Inespecífico
  6. Vacuna dengue

 

PDF

http://www.msal.gob.ar/images/stories/bes/graficos/0000000062cnt-guia-dengue-2016.pdf

 

 

 

February 2, 2016 at 8:27 am

Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection — United States, 2016

MMWR JAN. 26, 2016 V.65 N.3 P.1-5

Erin Staples, MD, PhD; Eric J. Dziuban, MD; Marc Fischer, MD; et al.

CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition….

FULL TEXT

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6503e3er.htm?s_cid=mm6503e3er_e

PDF

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/pdfs/mm6503e3er.pdf

January 27, 2016 at 8:27 am

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