Posts filed under ‘GUIDELINES’

Implementing an Antibiotic Stewardship Program – Guidelines by the IDSA and the SHEA

Clinical Infectious Diseases May 15, 2016 V.62 N.10 e51-e77

Tamar F. Barlam, Sara E. Cosgrove, Lilian M. Abbo, Conan MacDougall, Audrey N. Schuetz, Edward J. Septimus, Arjun Srinivasan, Timothy H. Dellit, Yngve T. Falck-Ytter, Neil O. Fishman, Cindy W. Hamilton, Timothy C. Jenkins, Pamela A. Lipsett, Preeti N. Malani, Larissa S. May, Gregory J. Moran, Melinda M. Neuhauser, Jason G. Newland, Christopher A. Ohl, Matthew H. Samore, Susan K. Seo, and Kavita K. Trivedi

1Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

2Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

3Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida

4Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco

5Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical Center/New York–Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York

6Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Houston

7Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

8Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle

9Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

10Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia

11Hamilton House, Virginia Beach, Virginia

12Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

13Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine and Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland

14Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor

15Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis

16Department of Emergency Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Sylmar

17Department of Veterans Affairs, Hines, Illinois

18Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri

19Section on Infectious Diseases, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

20Department of Veterans Affairs and University of Utah, Salt Lake City

21Infectious Diseases, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

22Trivedi Consults, LLC, Berkeley, California

Evidence-based guidelines for implementation and measurement of antibiotic stewardship interventions in inpatient populations including long-term care were prepared by a multidisciplinary expert panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The panel included clinicians and investigators representing internal medicine, emergency medicine, microbiology, critical care, surgery, epidemiology, pharmacy, and adult and pediatric infectious diseases specialties.

These recommendations address the best approaches for antibiotic stewardship programs to influence the optimal use of antibiotics.

PDF

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/62/10/e51.full.pdf

April 29, 2016 at 2:35 pm

Implementing an Antibiotic Stewardship Program – Guidelines by the IDSA and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

Clinical Infectious Diseases May 15, 2016 V.62 N.10 P.1197-1202

Executive Summary

Tamar F. Barlam, Sara E. Cosgrove, Lilian M. Abbo, Conan MacDougall, Audrey N. Schuetz, Edward J. Septimus, Arjun Srinivasan, Timothy H. Dellit, Yngve T. Falck-Ytter, Neil O. Fishman, Cindy W. Hamilton, Timothy C. Jenkins, Pamela A. Lipsett, Preeti N. Malani, Larissa S. May, Gregory J. Moran, Melinda M. Neuhauser, Jason G. Newland, Christopher A. Ohl, Matthew H. Samore, Susan K. Seo, and Kavita K. Trivedi

1Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

2Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

3Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida

4Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco

5Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical Center/New York–Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York

6Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Houston

7Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

8Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle

9Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

10Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia

11Hamilton House, Virginia Beach, Virginia

12Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

13Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine and Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland

14Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor

15Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis

16Department of Emergency Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Sylmar

17Department of Veterans Affairs, Hines, Illinois

18Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri

19Section on Infectious Diseases, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

20Department of Veterans Affairs and University of Utah, Salt Lake City

21Infectious Diseases, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

22Trivedi Consults, LLC, Berkeley, California

Evidence-based guidelines for implementation and measurement of antibiotic stewardship interventions in inpatient populations including long-term care were prepared by a multidisciplinary expert panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The panel included clinicians and investigators representing internal medicine, emergency medicine, microbiology, critical care, surgery, epidemiology, pharmacy, and adult and pediatric infectious diseases specialties.

These recommendations address the best approaches for antibiotic stewardship programs to influence the optimal use of antibiotics.

PDF

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/62/10/1197.full.pdf

April 29, 2016 at 2:33 pm

Zika Virus.

Clin Microbiol Rev. 2016 July V.29 N.3 P.487-524.

Musso D1, Gubler DJ2.

Author information

1Unit of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institut Louis Malardé, Tahiti, French Polynesia dmusso@ilm.pf duane.gubler@duke-nus.edu.sg

2Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore Partnership for Dengue Control, Lyon, France dmusso@ilm.pf  duane.gubler@duke-nus.edu.sg

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas.

ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya.

ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus.

The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated.

There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

PDF

http://cmr.asm.org/content/29/3/487.full.pdf

April 17, 2016 at 11:13 am

Diagnóstico y el tratamiento de la bacteriemia y endocarditis por Staphylococcus aureus. Una guía de práctica clínica de la Sociedad Española de Microbiología Clínica y Enfermedades Infecciosas (SEIMC)

Enf Infecc & Microbiol. Clínica Noviembre 2015 V.33 N.9 e1-e23

CONSENSO

Francesc Gudiol, José María Aguado, Benito Almirante, Emilio Bouza, Emilia Cercenado, M. Ángeles Domínguez, Oriol Gasch, Jaime Lora-Tamayo, José M. Miró, Mercedes Palomar, Alvaro Pascual, Juan M. Pericas, Miquel Pujol, Jesús Rodríguez-Baño, Evelyn Shaw, Alex Soriano, Jordi Vallés

a Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, IDIBELL, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain

b Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Instituto de Investigación i + 12, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain

c Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Valle de Hebrón, Barcelona, Spain

d Servicio de Microbiología y Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain

e Servicio de Microbiología, IDIBELL, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Departamento de patologia y terapeutica experimental, Universidad de Barcelona, Spain

f Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Spain

g Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Clinic – IDIBAPS, Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

h Servicio de Medicina Intensiva, Hospital Arnau de Vilanova, Lleida, Spain

i Unidad Clínica Intercentros de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Microbiología y Medicina Preventiva, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen Macarena y Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Departamento de Microbiología, Universidad de Sevilla, Spain

j Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Clinic IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain

k Servicio de Cuidados Intensivos, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90443317&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=49&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=en&fichero=28v33n09a90443317pdf001.pdf

 

April 9, 2016 at 10:08 am

Utilidad de las Guías de Práctica Clínica para el manejo de las infecciones graves producidas por Staphylococcus aureus

Enf Infecc & Microbiol. Clínica Noviembre 2015 V.33 N.9 P.577-8

Editorial

Winfried V. Kern

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90443308&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=40&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=en&fichero=28v33n09a90443308pdf001.pdf

April 9, 2016 at 10:02 am

Tratamiento de la infección del tracto urinario en los receptores de trasplantes de órganos sólidos: Declaración de consenso del Grupo de Estudio de Infección en receptores de trasplantes (GESITRA) de la Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEIMC) y la Red Española de Investigación en Patología Infecciosa (REIPI)

Enf Infecc & Microbiol. Clínica Diciembre 2015 V.33 N.10 e1-e21

CONSENSO

Elisa Vidal, Carlos Cervera, Elisa Cordero, Carlos Armiñanzas, Jordi Carratalá, José Miguel Cisneros, M. Carmen Fariñas, Francisco López-Medrano, Asunción Moreno, Patricia Muñoz, Julia Origüen, Núria Sabé, Maricela Valerio, Julián Torre-Cisneros

a Unidad Clínica de Gestión de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Instituto Maimónides de Investigación en Biomedicina de Córdoba, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain

b Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Clínic-Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

c Unidad Clínica de Gestión de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Microbiología y Medicina Preventiva, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain

d Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Universidad de Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain

e Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL), Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

f Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica 12 de Octubre, Departamento de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain

g Departamento de Microbiología Clínica y Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain

Antecedentes

Las infecciones del tracto urinario (ITU) son muy frecuentes en los receptores de un trasplante de órgano sólido (TOS).

Métodos

Investigadores y clínicos con experiencia en el TOS han desarrollado este documento de consenso para el mejor abordaje de estos pacientes. Hemos realizado una revisión sistemática y se ha especificado el nivel de evidencia para cada recomendación basado en la literatura disponible. Este artículo se ha redactado de acuerdo con las recomendaciones internacionales sobre documentos de consenso y las recomendaciones del Instrumento para Evaluación de Guías de Práctica Clínica II (AGREE II).

Resultados

Se realizan recomendaciones sobre el abordaje de la bacteriuria asintomática y sobre la profilaxis y tratamiento de las ITU en receptores de TOS. Se han revisado el abordaje diagnóstico-terapéutico de las ITU recurrentes y el papel de la ITU en el rechazo o disfunción del injerto renal. Finalmente, se incluyen recomendaciones sobre las interacciones entre antimicrobianos e inmunosupresores.

Conclusiones

Se incorpora a este documento la información científica más actualizada sobre la ITU en el contexto del TOS.

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90445480&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=160&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=en&fichero=28v33n10a90445480pdf001.pdf

 

Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2015;33:680-7

Executive summary.

Abordaje de la infección urinaria en receptores de trasplante de órgano sólido: documento de consenso del Grupo de Estudio de la Infección en Receptores de Trasplante (GESITRA) de la Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEIMC) y la Red Española para el Estudio de Patología Infecciosa (REIPI)

Elisa Vidal, Carlos Cervera, Elisa Cordero, Carlos Armiñanzas, Jordi Carratalá, José Miguel Cisneros, M. Carmen Fariñas, Francisco López-Medrano, Asunción Moreno, Patricia Muñoz, Julia Origüen, Núria Sabé, Maricela Valerio, Julián Torre-Cisneros

a Unidad Clínica de Gestión de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Instituto Maimónides de Investigación en Biomedicina de Córdoba, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain

b Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Clínic-Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

c Unidad Clínica de Gestión de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Microbiología y Medicina Preventiva, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain

d Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Universidad de Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain

e Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL), Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

f Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica 12 de Octubre, Departamento de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain

g Departamento de Microbiología Clínica y Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain

Las infecciones del tracto urinario (ITU) son muy frecuentes en los receptores de un trasplante de órgano sólido (TOS). Hemos realizado una revisión sistemática para determinar el abordaje de la ITU en receptores de TOS.

 

Se realizan recomendaciones sobre el abordaje de la bacteriuria asintomática y sobre la profilaxis y tratamiento de las ITU en receptores de TOS. Se han revisado el abordaje diagnóstico-terapéutico de las ITU recurrentes y el papel de la ITU en el rechazo o disfunción del injerto renal. Finalmente, se incluyen recomendaciones sobre las interacciones entre antimicrobianos e inmunosupresores.

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90445481&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=161&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=en&fichero=28v33n10a90445481pdf001.pdf

 

April 7, 2016 at 8:03 am

Documento de Consenso sobre Profilaxis Postexposición Ocupacional y No Ocupacional HIV, HBV y HCV en adultos y niños

Enf Infecc y Microb Clínica Febrero 2016 V.34 N.02

Objetivo

Actualizar las recomendaciones sobre la profilaxis postexposición ocupacional y no ocupacional, facilitando su uso apropiado desde el punto de vista asistencial.

Métodos

Este documento ha sido consensuado por un panel de expertos de la SPNS, de GESIDA, de la SEMST y de diferentes sociedades científicas relacionadas, tras revisar los resultados de eficacia y seguridad de ensayos clínicos, estudios de cohortes y de farmacocinética publicados en revistas biomédicas (PubMed y Embase) o presentados a congresos, y diferentes guías clínicas. La fuerza de la recomendación y la gradación de su evidencia se basan en los criterios del sistema GRADE.

Resultados

Se han elaborado unas recomendaciones para la valoración del riesgo de transmisión en los diferentes tipos de exposición; de las situaciones en las que debe recomendarse la profilaxis postexposición; de las circunstancias especiales a tener en cuenta; de las pautas de antirretrovirales, con su inicio y duración; del seguimiento precoz de la tolerancia y adherencia del tratamiento; del seguimiento posterior de las personas expuestas, independientemente de que hayan recibido profilaxis postexposición o no, y de la necesidad del apoyo psicológico.

Conclusiones

En este documento se actualizan las recomendaciones previas respecto a la profilaxis postexposición ocupacional y no ocupacional, tanto en adultos como en niños.

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90448436&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=38&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=es&fichero=28v34n02a90448436pdf001.pdf

April 3, 2016 at 12:04 pm

Older Posts


Calendar

May 2016
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 88 other followers