Posts filed under ‘Health Care-Associated Infections’

The Role of Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole in the Treatment of Infections Caused by Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

OPEN FORUM INFECTIOUS DISEASES January 2019 V.6 N.1

Courtney L Luterbach; Ashley Boshe; Heather I Henderson; Eric Cober; Sandra S Richter

In the Consortium on Resistance Against Carbapenems in Klebsiella and other Enterobacteriaceae (CRACKLE), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) had a limited role in the treatment of less severe carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections, especially urinary tract infections. Of tested CRE, only 29% were susceptible to TMP-SMX. Development of resistance further limits the use of TMP-SMX in CRE infections.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/ofid/article/6/1/ofy351/5250079

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January 20, 2019 at 12:18 pm

The prevention of Prosthetic Joint Infection (PJI)- 12 modifiable risk factors

The Bone & Joint Journal January 2019 V.101-B N.1 Suppl.A P.3-9

K. Alamanda, B. D. Springer

Aims

Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains a serious complication that is associated with high morbidity and costs. The aim of this study was to prepare a systematic review to examine patient-related and perioperative risk factors that can be modified in an attempt to reduce the rate of PJI.

Materials and Methods

A search of PubMed and MEDLINE was conducted for articles published between January 1990 and February 2018 with a combination of search terms to identify studies that dealt with modifiable risk factors for reducing the rate of PJI. An evidence-based review was performed on 12 specific risk factors: glycaemic control, obesity, malnutrition, smoking, vitamin D levels, preoperative Staphylococcus aureus screening, the management of anti-rheumatic medication, perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, presurgical skin preparation, the operating room environment, irrigant options, and anticoagulation.

Results

Poor glycaemic control, obesity, malnutrition, and smoking are all associated with increased rates of PJI. Vitamin D replacement has been shown in preliminary animal studies to decrease rates of PJI. Preoperative Staphylococcus aureus screening and appropriate treatment results in decreased rates of PJI. Perioperative variables, such as timely and appropriate dosage of prophylactic antibiotics, skin preparation with chlorohexidine-based solution, and irrigation with dilute betadine at the conclusion of the operation, have all been associated with reduced rates of PJI. Similarly, aggressive anticoagulation and increased operating room traffic should be avoided to help minimize risk of PJI.

Conclusion

PJI remains a serious complication of arthroplasty. Surgeons should be vigilant of the modifiable risk factors that can be addressed in an attempt to reduce the risk of PJI.

FULL TEXT

https://online.boneandjoint.org.uk/doi/full/10.1302/0301-620X.101B1.BJJ-2018-0233.R1

PDF

https://online.boneandjoint.org.uk/doi/pdf/10.1302/0301-620X.101B1.BJJ-2018-0233.R1

 

January 20, 2019 at 11:06 am

Osteomyelitis Complicating Sacral Pressure Ulcers: Whether or Not to Treat With Antibiotic Therapy

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 15, 2019 V.68 N.2 P.338–342

EDITOR’S CHOICE

Darren Wong; Paul Holtom; Brad Spellberg

The treatment of osteomyelitis in patients with stage IV sacral pressure ulcers is controversial. We conducted a systematic literature review and did not find evidence of benefit of antibacterial therapy in this setting without concomitant surgical debridement and wound coverage. Furthermore, many patients with chronically exposed bone do not have evidence of osteomyelitis when biopsied, and magnetic resonance imaging may not accurately distinguish osteomyelitis from bone remodeling. The goal of therapy should be local wound care and assessment for the potential of wound closure. If the wound can be closed and osteomyelitis is present on bone biopsy, appropriate antibiotic therapy is reasonable. We find no data to support antibiotic durations of >6 weeks in this setting, and some authors recommend 2 weeks of therapy if the osteomyelitis is limited to cortical bone. If the wound will not be closed, we find no clear evidence supporting a role for antibiotic therapy.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/68/2/338/5050260

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January 20, 2019 at 11:03 am

Clinical outcome and risk factors for failure in late acute prosthetic joint infections treated with debridement and implant retention

Journal of Infection January 2019 V.78 N.1 P.40–47 

Highlights

  • Late acute prosthetic joint infection (LA PJI) treated with surgical debridement and implant retention have a high failure rate.
  • The exchange of mobile components during surgical debridement is the most potent predictor for treatment success.
  • There are several preoperative patient related variables that increase the risk for failure.
  • Treatment strategies for late acute PJIs should be individualized and optimized according to the preoperative risk for failing.

Objectives

Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) is the recommended treatment for all acute prosthetic joint infections (PJI), but its efficacy in patients with late acute (LA) PJI is not well described.

Methods

Patients diagnosed with LA PJI between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. LA PJI was defined as the development of acute symptoms (≤ 3 weeks) occurring ≥ 3 months after arthroplasty. Failure was defined as: (i) the need for implant removal, (ii) infection related death, (iii) the need for suppressive antibiotic therapy and/or (iv) relapse or reinfection during follow-up.

Results

340 patients from 27 centers were included. The overall failure rate was 45.0% (153/340). Failure was dominated by Staphylococcus aureus PJI (54.7%, 76/139). Significant independent preoperative risk factors for failure according to the multivariate analysis were: fracture as indication for the prosthesis (odds ratio (OR) 5.4), rheumatoid arthritis (OR 5.1), age above 80 years (OR 2.6), male gender (OR 2.0) and C-reactive protein > 150 mg/L (OR 2.0). Exchanging the mobile components during DAIR was the strongest predictor for treatment success (OR 0.35).

Conclusion

LA PJIs have a high failure rate. Treatment strategies should be individualized according to patients’ age, comorbidity, clinical presentation and microorganism causing the infection.

FULL TEXT

https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(18)30241-X/fulltext

PDF

https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(18)30241-X/pdf

January 12, 2019 at 10:02 am

Mycobacterium tuberculosis prosthetic joint infections: A case series and literature review

Journal of Infection January 2019 V.78 N.1 P.27–34

Fabrice Uhel, Gregory Corvaisier, Yves Poinsignon, Catherine Chirouze, Guillaume Beraud, Olivier Grossi, Nicolas Varache, Cédric Arvieux, Rozenn Le Berre, Pierre Tattevin, for the Groupe d’Epidémiologie et Recherche en Infectiologie Clinique Centre-Ouest (GERICCO)

Objectives

We aimed to characterize diagnosis, management, and outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis prosthetic joint infections (PJI).

Methods

Cases of M. tuberculosis PJI documented in 7 referral French centers were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected from medical files on a standardized questionnaire. We performed a literature review using the keywords ‘prosthetic joint’, and ‘tuberculosis’.

Results

During years 1997–2016, 13 patients (8 males, 5 females, median age 79 years [range, 60–86]) had documented M. tuberculosis PJI, involving hip (n = 6), knee (n = 6), or shoulder (n = 1). Median time from arthroplasty to diagnosis was 9 years [0.4–20]. The diagnosis was obtained on joint aspirates (n = 9), or synovial tissue (n = 4). PCR was positive in all cases tested (5/5). Median duration of antituberculosis treatment was 14 months [6–32]). Nine patients underwent surgery: debridement (n = 4), resection arthroplasty (n = 3), and revision arthroplasty (1-stage exchange, n = 2). PJI was controlled in 12 patients. Seventeen additional cases of documented M. tuberculosis PJI have been reported, with a favorable outcome in 79% (11/14) of patients with no surgery, 85% (11/13) with debridement, 86% (19/22) with revision arthroplasty, and 81% (17/21) with resection (NS).

Conclusions

  1. tuberculosis PJI can be controlled with prolonged antituberculosis treatment in most cases, with or without surgical treatment.

FULL TEXT

https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(18)30253-6/abstract

PDF

https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(18)30253-6/pdf

January 12, 2019 at 10:01 am

Healthcare-associated infections: bacteriological characterization of the hospital surfaces in the University Hospital of Abomey-Calavi/so-ava in South Benin (West Africa).

BMC Infect Dis. January 7, 2019 V.19 N.1 P.28.                   

 

Afle FCD1, Agbankpe AJ2, Johnson RC3, Houngbégnon O4, Houssou SC5, Bankole HS4.

Author information

1 Interfaculty Center of Training and Research in Environment for Sustainable Development, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01, PO, Box 1463, Cotonou, Benin. cyrafle@yahoo.fr.

2 Research Unit in Applied Microbiology and Pharmacology of Natural Substances, Research Laboratory in Applied Biology, Polytechnic School of Abomey-Calavi University, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01, PO, Box 2009, Cotonou, Benin.

3 Interfaculty Center of Training and Research in Environment for Sustainable Development, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01, PO, Box 1463, Cotonou, Benin.

4 Bacteriology Laboratory of the Ministry of Public Health, 01, PO, Box 418, Cotonou, Benin.

5 Faculty of Human Sciences, University of Abomey Calavi, Cotonou, Benin.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Healthcare-associated infections have become a public health problem, creating a new burden on medical care in hospitals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria poses a difficult task for physicians, who have limited therapeutic options. The dissemination of pathogens depends on “reservoirs”, the different transmission pathways of the infectious agents and the factors favouring them. Contaminated environmental surfaces are an important potential reservoir for the transmission of many healthcare-associated pathogens. Pathogens can survive or persist in the environment for months and be a source of infection transmission when appropriate hygiene and disinfection procedures are inefficient. The aim of this study was to identify bacterial species from hospital surfaces in order to effectively prevent healthcare-associated infections.

METHODS:

Samples were taken from surfaces at the University Hospital of Abomey-Calavi/So-Ava in South Benin (West Africa). To achieve the objective of this study, 160 swab samples of hospital surfaces were taken as recommended by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14698-1). These samples were analysed in the bacteriology section of the National Laboratory for Biomedical Analysis. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS Statistics 21 software. A Chi Square Test was used to test the association between the Results of culture samples and different care units.

RESULTS:

Of the 160 surface samples, 65% were positive for bacteria. The frequency of isolation was predominant in Paediatrics (87.5%). The positive samples were 64.2% Gram-positive bacteria and 35.8% of Gram-negative bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus predominated (27.3%), followed by Bacillus spp. (23.3%). The proportion of other microorganisms was negligible. S. aureus and Staphylococcus spp. were present in all care units. There was a statistically significant association between the Results of culture samples and different care units (χ2 = 12.732; p = 0.048).

CONCLUSION:

The bacteria found on the surfaces of the University Hospital of Abomey-Calavi/So-Ava’s care environment suggest a risk of healthcare-associated infections. Adequate hospital hygiene measures are required. Patient safety in this environment must become a training priority for all caregivers.

FULL TEXT

https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-018-3648-x

PDF

https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12879-018-3648-x

January 11, 2019 at 8:46 am

Molecular analysis of bacterial contamination on stethoscopes in an intensive care unit

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. December 12, 2018

Background

Culture-based studies, which focus on individual organisms, have implicated stethoscopes as potential vectors of nosocomial bacterial transmission. However, the full bacterial communities that contaminate in-use stethoscopes have not been investigated.

Methods

We used bacterial 16S rRNA gene deep-sequencing, analysis, and quantification to profile entire bacterial populations on stethoscopes in use in an intensive care unit (ICU), including practitioner stethoscopes, individual-use patient-room stethoscopes, and clean unused individual-use stethoscopes. Two additional sets of practitioner stethoscopes were sampled before and after cleaning using standardized or practitioner-preferred methods.

Results

Bacterial contamination levels were highest on practitioner stethoscopes, followed by patient-room stethoscopes, whereas clean stethoscopes were indistinguishable from background controls. Bacterial communities on stethoscopes were complex, and community analysis by weighted UniFrac showed that physician and patient-room stethoscopes were indistinguishable and significantly different from clean stethoscopes and background controls. Genera relevant to healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) were common on practitioner stethoscopes, among which Staphylococcus was ubiquitous and had the highest relative abundance (6.8%–14% of contaminating bacterial sequences). Other HAI-related genera were also widespread although lower in abundance. Cleaning of practitioner stethoscopes resulted in a significant reduction in bacterial contamination levels, but these levels reached those of clean stethoscopes in only a few cases with either standardized or practitioner-preferred methods, and bacterial community composition did not significantly change.

Conclusions

Stethoscopes used in an ICU carry bacterial DNA reflecting complex microbial communities that include nosocomially important taxa. Commonly used cleaning practices reduce contamination but are only partially successful at modifying or eliminating these communities.

FULL TEXT

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/infection-control-and-hospital-epidemiology/article/molecular-analysis-of-bacterial-contamination-on-stethoscopes-in-an-intensive-care-unit/E5080DEC191CA8114D4CD564258CADE3/core-reader

December 31, 2018 at 1:03 pm

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