Posts filed under ‘Health Care-Associated Infections’

Streptococcus salivarius Prosthetic Joint Infection following Dental Cleaning despite Antibiotic Prophylaxis.

Case Rep Infect Dis. April 21, 2019   

Olson LB1, Turner DJ2, Cox GM3, Hostler CJ3,4.

Author information

1 Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA.

2 Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA.

3 Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

4 Infectious Disease Section, Durham VA Health Care System, Durham, USA.

Abstract

We present the case of a 92-year-old man with septic arthritis of a prosthetic hip joint due to Streptococcus salivarius one week following a high-risk dental procedure despite preprocedure amoxicillin. S. salivarius is a commensal bacterium of the human oral mucosa that is an uncommon cause of bacteremia. S. salivarius has previously been described as a causative agent of infective endocarditis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis but was only recently recognized as a cause of prosthetic joint infection. This case highlights the potential pathogenicity of a common commensal bacteria and the questionable utility of prophylactic antibiotics before dental procedures to prevent periprosthetic joint infections

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6501194/pdf/CRIID2019-8109280.pdf

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August 9, 2019 at 8:26 am

“’The not-so good prognosis of streptococcal periprosthetic joint infection managed by implant retention: the results of a large multicenter study.”

Clinical Infectious Diseases June 15, 2017 V.64 N.12 P.1742–1752

Lora-Tomayo, ´E. Senneville, A. Ribera et al.,

BACKGROUND.

Streptococci are not an infrequent cause of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Management by debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention (DAIR) is thought to produce a good prognosis, but little is known about the real likelihood of success.

METHODS.

A retrospective, observational, multicenter, international study was performed during 2003-2012. Eligible patients had a streptococcal PJI that was managed with DAIR. The primary endpoint was failure, defined as death related to infection, relapse/persistence of infection, or the need for salvage therapy.

RESULTS.

Overall, 462 cases were included (median age 72 years, 50% men). The most frequent species was Streptococcus agalactiae (34%), and 52% of all cases were hematogenous. Antibiotic treatment was primarily using β-lactams, and 37% of patients received rifampin. Outcomes were evaluable in 444 patients: failure occurred in 187 (42.1%; 95% confidence interval, 37.5%-46.7%) after a median of 62 days from debridement; patients without failure were followed up for a median of 802 days. Independent predictors (hazard ratios) of failure were rheumatoid arthritis (2.36), late post-surgical infection (2.20), and bacteremia (1.69). Independent predictors of success were exchange of removable components (0.60), early use of rifampin (0.98 per day of treatment within the first 30 days), and long treatments (≥21 days) with β-lactams, either as monotherapy (0.48) or in combination with rifampin (0.34).

CONCLUSIONS.

This is the largest series to our knowledge of streptococcal PJI managed by DAIR, showing a worse prognosis than previously reported. The beneficial effects of exchanging the removable components and of β-lactams are confirmed and maybe also a potential benefit from adding rifampin.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/64/12/1742/3078956

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

August 9, 2019 at 8:25 am

Managing All the Genotypic Knowledge: Approach to a Septic Patient Colonized by Different Enterobacteriales with Unique Carbapenemases

Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. August 2019 V.63 N.8

The recent development of new antimicrobials active against carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriales (CPE) has brought new hope for the treatment of infections due to these organisms.

However, the evolving epidemiology of bacteria with carbapenemases may complicate management, as providers are faced with treating patients colonized by bacteria producing multiple carbapenemases.

Here, we present the clinical course and treatment of Raoultella planticola bacteremia in a cirrhotic patient known to be colonized with both blaKPC- and blaOXA-48-carrying organisms.

abstract

https://aac.asm.org/content/63/8/e00029-19.abstract?etoc

PDF

https://aac.asm.org/content/aac/63/8/e00029-19.full.pdf

July 27, 2019 at 10:43 am

Rates of blood cultures positive for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in Ontario: a quasi-experimental study

CMAJ Open

Jennie Johnstone, MD, PhD, Michelle E. Policarpio, MSc, Freda Lam, MPH, Kwaku Adomako, MSc, Chatura Prematunge, MSc, Emily Nadolny, MA, MPH, Ye Li, PhD, Kevin Brown, PhD, Elaine Kerr, ART, BA, Gary Garber, MD

Affiliations: Public Health Ontario (Johnstone, Policarpio, Lam, Adomako, Prematunge, Nadolny, Li, Brown, Garber); St. Joseph’s Health Centre (Johnstone); Department of Medicine (Johnstone, Garber); Dalla Lana School of Public Health (Johnstone, Li, Brown), University of Toronto; Institute for Quality Management in Healthcare (Kerr), Toronto, Ont.; Department of Medicine (Garber), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont.

Background

Some Ontario hospitals have discontinued active screening and isolation programs for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). The aim of this study was to determine whether this practice change is associated with a change in the rate of rise of VRE-positive blood cultures.

Methods

All Ontario hospitals are mandated to report VRE bacteremia. Using this publicly reported data set, we included all validated results between January 2009 and June 2015. Beginning in June 2012, some hospitals discontinued active VRE screening and isolation programs (intervention). We used an interrupted time series Poisson regression to assess the slope change in the incidence rate of VRE-positive blood cultures (primary outcome) after versus before the intervention. Hospitals that continued to screen were the comparison group. Incidence rates were adjusted for hospital type and clustering within hospital site; slope changes are presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results

In hospitals that had ceased screening (n = 13), there was an increase in slope after screening and isolation were discontinued compared with before screening and isolation were discontinued (slope change IRR 1.25 [95% CI 1.01-1.54]). In hospitals that continued screening (n = 50), the slope was not significantly different after June 2012 compared with before June 2012 (slope change IRR 0.81 [95% CI 0.56-1.15]).

Interpretation

There was a significant increase in the rate of rise of VRE-positive blood cultures in hospitals that discontinued active VRE screening and isolation programs but not in hospitals that continued to screen and isolate. Hospitals aiming to minimize rising rates should consider maintaining active screening and isolation programs.

FULL TEXT

http://cmajopen.ca/content/5/2/E273.full

PDF

http://cmajopen.ca/content/5/2/E273.full.pdf

July 21, 2019 at 7:55 pm

Efficacy and accuracy of qSOFA and SOFA scores as prognostic tools for community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia

International Journal of Infectious Diseases July 2019 V.84 P.89-96

Nobuhiro Asai, Hiroki Watanabe, Arufumi Shiota, Hideo Kato, Daisuke Sakanashi, Mao Hagihara, Yusuke Koizumi, Yuka Yamagishi, Hiroyuki Suematsu, Hiroshige Mikamo

Highlights

  • The Japanese Respiratory Society recently updated the prognostic guidelines for pneumonia in 2017.
  • The new guidelines recommend that pneumonia severity be evaluated using the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and the quick SOFA (qSOFA) scoring systems in a therapeutic strategy flowchart.
  • The combination of qSOFA and SOFA score could be an independent prognostic factor for 30-day mortality among patients with community-onset pneumonia.

Background

The Japanese Respiratory Society recently updated its prognostic guidelines for pneumonia, recommending that pneumonia severity be evaluated using the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and quick SOFA (qSOFA) scoring systems in a therapeutic strategy flowchart. However, the efficacy and accuracy of these tools are still unknown.

Methods

All patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) who were admitted to the study institution between 2014 and 2017 were enrolled in this study. Pneumonia severity on admission was evaluated by A-DROP, CURB-65, PSI, I-ROAD, qSOFA, and SOFA scoring systems. Prognostic factors for 30-day mortality were also analyzed.

Results

This study included 406 patients, 257 male (63%) and 149 female (37%). The median age was 79 years (range 19–103 years). The 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates were both 5%. With respect to the diagnostic value of the predictive assessments for 30-day mortality, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) value for the SOFA score was 0.769 for CAP patients and 0.774 for HCAP patients. Further, the AUROC values for the SOFA score in CAP and HCAP patients with a qSOFA score ≥2 were 0.829 and 0.784, respectively, for 30-day mortality.

Conclusions

qSOFA and SOFA scores were able to correctly evaluate the severity of CAP and HCAP.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30190-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30190-0/pdf

June 30, 2019 at 9:25 pm

Review – Clostridium difficile infection.

European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases. June 2019 V.38 N.7

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus, which is widely distributed in the intestinal tract of humans and animals and in the environment.

In the last decade, the frequency and severity of C. difficile infection has been increasing worldwide to become one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. Transmission of this pathogen occurs by the fecal-oral route and the most important risk factors include antibiotic therapy, old age, and hospital or nursing home stay.

The clinical picture is diverse and ranges from asymptomatic carrier status, through various degrees of diarrhea, to the most severe, life threatening colitis resulting with death. Diagnosis is based on direct detection of C. difficile toxins in feces, most commonly with the use of EIA assay, but no single test is suitable as a stand-alone test confirming CDI.

Antibiotics of choice are vancomycin, fidaxomicin, and metronidazole, though metronidazole is considered as inferior. The goal of this review is to update physicians on current scientific knowledge of C. difficile infection, focusing also on fecal microbiota transplantation which is a promising therapy.

FULL TEXT

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10096-019-03539-6?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals&utm_source=toc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=toc_10096_38_7

PDF

https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs10096-019-03539-6.pdf

June 20, 2019 at 7:04 pm

A Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests (NAATs) and Algorithms Including NAATs for the Diagnosis of Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile in Adults

Clinical Microbiololy Reviwes July 2019 V.32 N.3

The evidence base for the optimal laboratory diagnosis of Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile in adults is currently unresolved due to the uncertain performance characteristics and various combinations of tests. This systematic review evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of laboratory testing algorithms that include nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) to detect the presence of C. difficile. The systematic review and meta-analysis included eligible studies (those that had PICO [population, intervention, comparison, outcome] elements) that assessed the diagnostic accuracy of NAAT alone or following glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) or GDH EIAs plus C. difficile toxin EIAs (toxin). The diagnostic yield of NAAT for repeat testing after an initial negative result was also assessed. Two hundred thirty-eight studies met inclusion criteria. Seventy-two of these studies had sufficient data for meta-analysis. The strength of evidence ranged from high to insufficient. The uses of NAAT only, GDH-positive EIA followed by NAAT, and GDH-positive/toxin-negative EIA followed by NAAT are all recommended as American Society for Microbiology (ASM) best practices for the detection of the C. difficile toxin gene or organism. Meta-analysis of published evidence supports the use of testing algorithms that use NAAT alone or in combination with GDH or GDH plus toxin EIA to detect the presence of C. difficile in adults. There is insufficient evidence to recommend against repeat testing of the sample using NAAT after an initial negative result due to a lack of evidence of harm (i.e., financial, length of stay, or delay of treatment) as specified by the Laboratory Medicine Best Practices (LMBP) systematic review method in making such an assessment. Findings from this systematic review provide clarity to diagnostic testing strategies and highlight gaps, such as low numbers of GDH/toxin/PCR studies, in existing evidence on diagnostic performance, which can be used to guide future clinical research studies.

FULL TEXT

https://cmr.asm.org/content/32/3/e00032-18.abstract?etoc

PDF

https://cmr.asm.org/content/cmr/32/3/e00032-18.full.pdf

June 19, 2019 at 2:57 pm

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