Posts filed under ‘HIC no SIDA’

A systems biology approach to the effect of aging, immunosenescence and vaccine response.

Current Opinion in Immunology August 2014 V.29 P.62-8.

Poland GA1, Ovsyannikova IG2, Kennedy RB2, Lambert ND2, Kirkland JL3.

Author information

1 Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: poland.gregory@mayo.edu.

2 Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

3 Robert & Arlene Kogod Center on Aging, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

Aging can lead to immunosenescence, which dramatically impairs the hosts’ ability to develop protective immune responses to vaccine antigens. Reasons for this are not well understood.

This topic’s importance is reflected in the increases in morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases among elderly persons, a population growing in size globally, and the significantly lower adaptive immune responses generated to vaccines in this population.

Here, we endeavor to summarize the existing data on the genetic and immunologic correlates of immunosenescence with respect to vaccine response.

We cover how the application of systems biology can advance our understanding of vaccine immunosenescence, with a view toward how such information could lead to strategies to overcome the lower immunogenicity of vaccines in the elderly.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4119552/pdf/nihms589246.pdf

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February 19, 2018 at 9:12 am

The microbiota and microbiome in aging: potential implications in health and age-related diseases.

J Am Geriatr Soc. April 2015 V.63 N.4 P.776-81.

Zapata HJ1, Quagliarello VJ.

Author information

1 Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

Advances in bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing allow for characterization of the human commensal bacterial community (microbiota) and its corresponding genome (microbiome).

Surveys of healthy adults reveal that a signature composite of bacteria characterizes each unique body habitat (e.g., gut, skin, oral cavity, vagina).

A myriad of clinical changes, including a basal proinflammatory state (inflamm-aging), that directly interface with the microbiota of older adults and enhance susceptibility to disease accompany aging.

Studies in older adults demonstrate that the gut microbiota correlates with diet, location of residence (e.g., community dwelling, long-term care settings), and basal level of inflammation.

Links exist between the microbiota and a variety of clinical problems plaguing older adults, including physical frailty, Clostridium difficile colitis, vulvovaginal atrophy, colorectal carcinoma, and atherosclerotic disease.

Manipulation of the microbiota and microbiome of older adults holds promise as an innovative strategy to influence the development of comorbidities associated with aging.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4406803/pdf/nihms-644813.pdf

February 19, 2018 at 9:11 am

The Brief Case: Bacteremia Caused by Helicobacter cinaedi

Journal of Clinical Microbiology January 2017 V.55 N.1 P.5-9

Allen C. Bateman and Susan M. Butler-Wu* Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

Carey-Ann D. Burnham, Editor Washington University School of Medicine

CASE

A 61-year-old male with relapsed multiple myeloma presented to clinic with fatigue and chills.

The patient had undergone two rounds of autologous stem cell transplantation in 2012 and was undergoing chemotherapy with pomalidomide, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone.

He was admitted for neutropenic fever (absolute neutrophil count of 1.4 × 109/liter, temperature of 38.4°C). His physical exam was normal, and he denied any other symptoms.

Two sets of blood cultures were obtained (VersaTREK Redox; Trek Diagnostic Systems), and the patient was started on levofloxacin, vancomycin, and cefepime. His fever subsided after 24 h, and he was discharged home to complete a 30-day course of oral levofloxacin…

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/1/5.full.pdf+html

October 19, 2017 at 3:04 pm

Infective endocarditis in patients with cancer: a consequence of invasive procedures or a harbinger of neoplasm? –  A prospective, multicenter cohort

Medicine: September 2017 – Volume 96 – Issue 38 – p e7913

Fernández-Cruz, Ana MD, PhDa,b,*; Muñoz, Patricia MD, PhDa,b,c,d; Sandoval, Carmen MDb,e; Fariñas, Carmen MD, PhDf; Gutiérrez-Cuadra, Manuel MD, PhDf; Pericás Pulido, Juan M. MD, PhDg; Miró, José M. MD, PhDg; Goenaga-Sánchez, Miguel Á. MDh; de Alarcón, Arístides MDi; Bonache-Bernal, Francisco MDj; Rodríguez, MªÁngeles MD, PhDk; Noureddine, Mariam MD, PhDl; Bouza Santiago, Emilio MD, PhDa,b,c,d; on behalf of the Spanish Collaboration on Endocarditis (GAMES)

Abstract

The aim of the study was to draw a comparison between the characteristics of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with cancer and those of IE in noncancer patients.

Patients with IE, according to the modified Duke criteria, were prospectively included in the GAMES registry between January 2008 and February 2014 in 30 hospitals. Patients with active cancer were compared with noncancer patients.

During the study period, 161 episodes of IE fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We studied 2 populations: patients whose cancer was diagnosed before IE (73.9%) and those whose cancer and IE were diagnosed simultaneously (26.1%). The latter more frequently had community-acquired IE (67.5% vs 26.4%, P < .01), severe sepsis (28.6% vs 11.1%, P = .013), and IE caused by gastrointestinal streptococci (42.9% vs 16.8%, P < .01). However, catheter source (7.1% vs 29.4%, P = .003), invasive procedures (26.2% vs 44.5%, P = .044), and immunosuppressants (9.5% vs 35.6%, P = .002) were less frequent.

When compared with noncancer patients, patients with cancer were more often male (75.2% vs 67.7%, P = .049), with a higher comorbidity index (7 vs 4). In addition, IE was more often nosocomial (48.7% vs 29%) and originated in catheters (23.6% vs 6.2%) (all P < .01). Prosthetic endocarditis (21.7% vs 30.3%, P = .022) and surgery when indicated (24.2% vs 46.5%, P < .01) were less common. In-hospital mortality (34.8% vs 25.8%, P = .012) and 1-year mortality (47.8% vs 30.9%, P < .01) were higher in cancer patients, although 30-day mortality was not (24.8% vs 19.3%, P = .087).

A significant proportion of cases of IE (5.6%) were recorded in cancer patients, mainly as a consequence of medical interventions. IE may be a harbinger of occult cancer, particularly that of gastrointestinal or urinary origin.

FULL TEXT

http://journals.lww.com/md-journal/Fulltext/2017/09220/Infective_endocarditis_in_patients_with_cancer___a.11.aspx

PDF (CLIC en “ARTICLE as PDF”)

September 22, 2017 at 4:19 pm

Efficacy of β-Lactam/β-Lactamase Inhibitor Combinations for the Treatment of Bloodstream Infection Due to Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Hematological Patients with Neutropenia

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Sept 2017 V.61 N.9

Carlota Gudiol, Cristina Royo-Cebrecos, Edson Abdala, Murat Akova, Rocío Álvarez, Guillermo Maestro-de la Calle, Angela Cano, Carlos Cervera, Wanessa T. Clemente, Pilar Martín-Dávila, Alison Freifeld, Lucía Gómez, Thomas Gottlieb, Mercè Gurguí, Fabián Herrera, Adriana Manzur, Georg Maschmeyer, Yolanda Meije, Miguel Montejo, Maddalena Peghin, Jesús Rodríguez-Baño, Isabel Ruiz-Camps, Teresa C. Sukiennik, Cristian Tebe, and Jordi Carratalà

aInfectious Diseases Department, Bellvitge University Hospital, IDIBELL, University of Barcelona, Spain

bDuran i Reynals Hospital, ICO, Barcelona, Spain

cInstituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

dHacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey

eClinical Unit of Infectious Diseases, Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, Infectious Diseases Research Group, Institute of Biomedicine of Seville (IBiS), University of Seville/CSIC/University Hospitals Virgen del Rocio and Virgen Macarena, Seville, Spain

fInfectious Diseases Unit, Instituto de Investigación Hospital 12 de Octubre (i+12), 12 de Octubre University Hospital, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain

gReina Sofía University Hospital-IMIBIC-UCO, Córdoba, Spain

hUniversity Hospital of Alberta, Alberta, Canada

iDigestive Transplant Service, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil

jInfectious Diseases Department, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain

kInternal Medicine, Infectious Diseases Section, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA

lInternal Medicine, University Hospital Mútua de Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain

mDepartment of Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, Concord Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia

nInfectious Diseases Unit, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau and Instituto de Investigación Biomédica Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

oInfectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas (CEMIC), Buenos Aires, Argentina

pInfectious Diseases, Hospital Rawson, San Juan, Argentina

qDepartment of Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Care, Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann, Academic Teaching Hospital of Charité University Medical School, Berlin, Germany

rInfectious Disease Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Barcelona Hospital, SCIAS, Barcelona, Spain

sInfectious Diseases Unit, Cruces University Hospital, Bilbao, Spain

tInfectious Diseases Division, Santa Maria Misericordia University Hospital, Udine, Italy

uClinical Unit of Infectious Diseases, Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, University Hospitals Virgen Macarena and Virgen del Rocío—IBiS, Department of Medicine, University of Seville, Seville, Spain

vInfectious Diseases Department, Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain

wHospital Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil

xStatistics Advisory Service, Institute of Biomedical Research of Bellvitge, Rovira i Virgili University, Tarragona, Spain

yREIPI (Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Disease), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain

β-Lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors (BLBLIs) were compared to carbapenems in two cohorts of hematological neutropenic patients with extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) bloodstream infection (BSI): the empirical therapy cohort (174 patients) and the definitive therapy cohort (251 patients).

The 30-day case fatality rates and other secondary outcomes were similar in the two therapy groups of the two cohorts and also in the propensity-matched cohorts. BLBLIs might be carbapenem-sparing alternatives for the treatment of BSI due to ESBLs in these patients.

PDF

http://aac.asm.org/content/61/8/e00164-17.full.pdf+html

 

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy August 2017 V.61 N.8

COMMENTARY

Use of β-Lactam/β-Lactamase Inhibitors for Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase Infections: Defining the Right Patient Population

Pranita D. Tamma and Maria Virginia Villegas

aJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

bMolecular Genetics and Antimicrobial Resistance Unit—International Center for Microbial Genomics Universidad El Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia

In a multicenter, multinational observational study that included neutropenic patients with bloodstream infections by extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing species, Gudiol et al. (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 61:e00164-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00164-17) demonstrated that β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors are effective treatment options.

A review of this work, however, reminds us that some lingering questions remain for specific high-risk subgroups.

PDF

http://aac.asm.org/content/61/8/e01094-17.full.pdf+html

August 30, 2017 at 8:17 am

Moraxella osloensis peritonitis : Case report and review.

Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Jun;29(3):161-3.

[Article in Spanish]

Hernández-Egido S1, Puerta-Mateo A, Cores-Calvo O, Ruiz-Ferraras E.

Author information

1 Sara Hernández Egido, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca Paseo de San Vicente nº 58-182 C.P. 37007 Salamanca, Spain. sathassa@hotmail.com.

PDF

http://seq.es/seq/0214-3429/29/3/hernandez26mar2016.pdf

August 2, 2017 at 4:20 pm

Moraxella osloensis, an emerging pathogen of endocarditis in immunocompromised patients?

Swiss Med Wkly. 2015 Sep 16;145:w14185.

Gagnard JC1, Hidri N2, Grillon A3, Jesel L4, Denes E5.

Author information

1 Infectious Diseases Department, Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.

2 Bacteriology Laboratory, Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.

3 Bacteriology Laboratory, Strasbourg Teaching Hospital, France.

4 Cardiology Department, Strasbourg Teaching Hospital, France.

5 CHU Dupuytren, 2 Ave Martin Luther King, LIMOGES, FRANCE.

Abstract

We report two cases of endocarditis due to Moraxella osloensis. Only one previous case of such infection has been described.

These infections occurred in immunocompromised patients (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and kidney graft associated with Hodgkin’s disease) and both patients had a favourable outcome with a complete cure of their infectious endocarditis.

This bacterium could be an emerging pathogen revealed by MALDI-TOF. Indeed, its characterisation within the Moraxella group by use of biochemistry-based methods is difficult.

Moreover, this strain could be particularly involved in immunocompromised patients.

FULL TEXT

https://smw.ch/article/doi/smw.2015.14185

August 2, 2017 at 4:17 pm

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