Posts filed under ‘HIC no SIDA’

Measles virus infection diminishes preexisting antibodies that offer protection from other pathogens.

Measles Virus Infection Negatively Affects Host Immune Status

New evidence shows that measles infection decreases the breadth and titers of preexisting antibodies to a wide variety of pathogens

SOURCE

Science. November 1, 2019 V.366 N.6465 P.599-606.

Mina MJ1,2,3, Kula T4,2, Leng Y4, Li M2, de Vries RD5, Knip M6,7, Siljander H6,7, Rewers M8, Choy DF9, Wilson MS9, Larman HB10, Nelson AN11, Griffin DE11, de Swart RL5, Elledge SJ1,2,12.

Author information

1 Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA. selledge@genetics.med.harvard.edu  mmina@hsph.harvard.edu

2 Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

3 Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

4 Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

5 Department of Viroscience, Postgraduate School of Molecular Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, 3015 CN, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

6 Children’s Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 00290 Helsinki, Finland.

7 Research Program for Clinical and Molecular Metabolism, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.

8 Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO 80045, USA.

9 Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA.

10 Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

11 W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

12Program in Virology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

Measles virus is directly responsible for more than 100,000 deaths yearly. Epidemiological studies have associated measles with increased morbidity and mortality for years after infection, but the reasons why are poorly understood. Measles virus infects immune cells, causing acute immune suppression. To identify and quantify long-term effects of measles on the immune system, we used VirScan, an assay that tracks antibodies to thousands of pathogen epitopes in blood. We studied 77 unvaccinated children before and 2 months after natural measles virus infection. Measles caused elimination of 11 to 73% of the antibody repertoire across individuals. Recovery of antibodies was detected after natural reexposure to pathogens. Notably, these immune system effects were not observed in infants vaccinated against MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella), but were confirmed in measles-infected macaques. The reduction in humoral immune memory after measles infection generates potential vulnerability to future infections, underscoring the need for widespread vaccination.

FULL TEXT

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/366/6465/599.long

PDF

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/sci/366/6465/599.full.pdf

November 18, 2019 at 7:04 pm

Vaccination Guidelines for Patients with Immune-Mediated Disorders on Immunosuppressive Therapies-Executive Summary. 

Journal of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology  December 2019 V.2 N.4 P.149-152.

Papp KA, Haraoui B, Kumar D, Marshall JK, Bissonnette R, Bitton A, et al.

The use of immunosuppressive therapies for immune-mediated disease (IMD) is associated with an elevated risk of infections and related comorbidities. While many infectious diseases can generally be prevented by vaccines, immunization rates in this specific patient population remain suboptimal, due in part to uncertainty about their efficacy or safety under these clinical situations. To address this concern, a multidisciplinary group of Canadian physicians with expertise in dermatology, gastroenterology, infectious diseases and rheumatology developed evidence-based clinical guidelines on vaccinations featuring 13 statements that are aimed at reducing the risk of preventable infections in individuals exposed to immunosuppressive agents.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785689/

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785689/pdf/gwy069.pdf

November 15, 2019 at 8:13 am

Traditional Laboratory Markers Hold Low Diagnostic Utility for Immunosuppressed Patients With Periprosthetic Joint Infections

Journal of Arthroplasty July 2019 V.34 N.7 P.1441–1445

Background

Although predictive laboratory markers and cutoffs for immunocompetent patients are well-studied, similar reference ranges and decision thresholds for immunosuppressed patients are less understood. We investigated the utility of typical laboratory markers in immunosuppressed patients undergoing aspiration of a prosthetic hip or knee joint.

Methods

A retrospective review of adult patients with an immunosuppressed state that underwent primary and revision total joint arthroplasty with a subsequent infection at our tertiary, academic institution was conducted. Infection was defined by Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria. A multivariable analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with acute (<90 days) and chronic (>90 days) infection. Area under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) was used to determine the best supported laboratory cut points for identifying infection.

Results

We identified 90 patients with immunosuppression states totaling 172 aspirations. Mean follow-up from aspiration was 33 months. In a multivariate analysis, only synovial fluid cell count and synovial percent neutrophils were found to be independently correlated with both acute and chronic infection. A synovial fluid cell count cutoff value of 5679 nucleated cells/mm3 maximized the AUC (0.839) for predicting acute infection, while a synovial fluid cell count cutoff value of 1293 nucleated cells/mm3 maximized the AUC (0.931) for predicting chronic infection.

Conclusion

Physicians should be aware of lower levels of synovial nucleated cell count and percentage of neutrophils in prosthetic joint infections of the hip or knee in patients with immunosuppression. Further investigation is necessary to identify the best means of diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection in this patient population.

FULL TEXT

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(19)30236-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(19)30236-0/pdf

August 30, 2019 at 4:10 pm

Listeriosis in Spain based on hospitalisation records, 1997 to 2015: need for greater awareness

Eurosuveillance

Listeriosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the genus Listeria spp. L. monocytogenes is the major pathogenic species in both animals and humans. L. monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped organism that can grow in aerobic and anaerobic conditions [1], is widely distributed in the environment and is able to contaminate a wide variety of foods or beverages (soft cheese, deli meats, unpasteurised milk, refrigerated smoked seafood, etc.) [2]. The bacteria can multiply at refrigerator temperatures [3]; therefore, contaminated products are often kept for several days or even weeks, e.g. in the household/restaurants, and may be eaten on multiple occasions, which can complicate the identification of the incriminated food source [4].

The clinical syndromes of listeriosis include: febrile gastroenteritis, sepsis, central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the form of encephalitis, meningoencephalitis and focal infections such as pneumonia myo-endocarditis and septic arthritis, etc [5]. Invasive listeriosis most commonly affects pregnant women, neonates, elderly people and people with chronic conditions or weakened immune response [6]. Listeriosis has one of the highest case fatality rates among all food-borne infections; when it affects the CNS, the mortality rate is above 50% and neurological sequelae are present in more than 60% of survivors [2]. Listeriosis is also associated with fetal and neonatal death.

Worldwide, listeriosis is an emerging infection of public health concern [7]. In Europe, human listeriosis peaked in incidence during the 1980s, showed a general decline during the 1990s and stabilised in the 2000s [8]. More recent data show an increasing trend since 2008 [9]. This increase seems to be related to the ageing of the population and the increase in life expectancy of immunocompromised patients, but also to changes in the ways food is produced, stored, distributed and consumed around the world [10]. Although listeriosis is often a sporadic disease [11], large food-borne outbreaks have occurred during the last decade in Europe and the United States (US) [12]. In South Africa, an outbreak with more than 1,024 laboratory-confirmed listeriosis cases, as at 2 May 2018, has been ongoing since the start of 2017, with a 28.6% case fatality rate [13].

In Spain, food safety criteria (FSC) for L. monocytogenes follow European Commission (EC) regulations [14,15]. Before 2015, when it was added to the list of mandatory notifiable diseases, regions could voluntarily report listeriosis to the Microbiological Information System (Sistema de Información Microbiológica, SIM) [16]. Using the centralised hospital discharge database (Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos, CMBD), we aimed to describe the epidemiology of listeriosis in Spain from 1997–2015.

FULL TEXT

https://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2019.24.21.1800271

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June 21, 2019 at 7:49 am

A Therapeutic Strategy for All Pneumonia Patients: A 3-Year Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study Using Risk Factors for Multidrug-resistant Pathogens to Select Initial Empiric Therapy

Clinical Infectious Diseases April 1, 2019 V.68 N.7 P.1080-1088 

EDITOR’S CHOICE

We applied a single algorithm to all forms of pneumonia, which was followed in 82.5% of a cohort of 1089 patients. Only 4.3% received inappropriate therapy; in multivariate analysis, site of pneumonia acquisition was not predictive of 30-day mortality.

Background

Empiric therapy of pneumonia is currently based on the site of acquisition (community or hospital), but could be chosen, based on risk factors for multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, independent of site of acquisition.

Methods 

We prospectively applied a therapeutic algorithm based on MDR risks, in a multicenter cohort study of  1089 patients with 656 community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), 238 healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP), 140 hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), or 55 ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP).

Results

Approximately 83% of patients were treated according to the algorithm, with 4.3% receiving inappropriate therapy. The frequency of MDR pathogens varied, respectively, with VAP (50.9%), HAP (27.9%), HCAP (10.9%), and CAP (5.2%). Those with ≥2 MDR risks had MDR pathogens more often than those with 0–1 MDR risk (25.8% vs 5.3%, P < .001). The 30-day mortality rates were as follows: VAP (18.2%), HAP (13.6%), HCAP (6.7%), and CAP (4.7%), and were lower in patients with 0–1 MDR risks than in those with ≥2 MDR risks (4.5% vs 12.5%, P < .001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, 5 risk factors (advanced age, hematocrit <30%, malnutrition, dehydration, and chronic liver disease), as well as hypotension and inappropriate therapy were significantly correlated with 30-day mortality, whereas the classification of pneumonia type (VAP, HAP, HCAP, CAP) was not.

Conclusions

Individual MDR risk factors can be used in a unified algorithm to guide and simplify empiric therapy for all pneumonia patients, and were more important than the classification of site of pneumonia acquisition in determining 30-day mortality.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/68/7/1080/5063558

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

May 4, 2019 at 12:14 pm

Infección por Strongyloides stercoralis: estudio epidemiológico, clínico, diagnóstico y terapéutico en 30 pacientes

Revista Chilena de Infectologia Junio 2011 V.28 N.3

Marcelo Corti, María F. Villafañe, Norberto Trione, Daniel Risso, Juan Carlos Abuín y Omar Palmieri

Hospital de Enfermedades Infecciosas Francisco J. Muñiz, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Antecedentes

Strongyloides stercoralis, parásito endémico de áreas tropicales y subtropicales del planeta, en sujetos inmunodeprimidos puede cursar con formas graves y aun mortales como el síndrome de hiperinfestación y la enfermedad diseminada.

Métodos

Análisis retrospectivo de las características epidemiológicas, manifestaciones clínicas, co-infección por virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH), hallazgos microbiológicos y evolución de 30 pacientes con estrongiloidiasis, atendidos en el Hospital de Enfermedades Infecciosas F. J. Muñiz de Buenos Aires, entre enero 2004 y diciembre 2008.

Resultados

Se incluyeron en la evaluación 20 hombres y 10 mujeres con una mediana de edad de 33 años. Co-infección por VIH hubo en 21 pacientes (70%); la mediana de linfocitos T CD4+ en ellos al momento del diagnóstico de la parasitosis fue de 50 céls/mm3 (rango 7 a 355), (media de 56 céls/mm3). En los pacientes seronegativos para VIH, se comprobaron las siguientes co-morbilidades: tuberculosis (n: 3) y un caso de cada una de las siguientes afecciones: alcoholismo crónico, diabetes mellitus, reacción lepromatosa bajo corticotera-pia, y psoriasis en tratamiento inmunosupresor. Hubo dos pacientes sin aparentes enfermedades de base. Diecisiete pacientes presentaron enfermedad intestinal crónica con diarrea (57%), era asintomática y fue sospechada por la eosinofilia periférica (n: 7, 23%) y se clasificó como síndrome de hiperinfestación (n: 6, 20%) diagnosticado por la identificación de larvas en la materia fecal y secreciones broncopulmonares. Diecisiete pacientes (57%) presentaron eosinofilia periférica. El diagnóstico se efectuó por la visualización directa de las larvas en muestras de heces en fresco mediante la técnica de concentración de Baer-man (n: 20); por el examen copro-parasitológico seriado (n: 2) y por ambos métodos (n: 1); en líquido duodenal y materia fecal (n: 1) y por la identificación de larvas en materia fecal y secreciones respiratorias (n: 6). Letalidad global: 20% (6/30). Los pacientes con eosinofilia tuvieron una menor letalidad que aquellos sin esta respuesta (p < 0,001). No hubo correlación estadística entre la edad y la supervivencia. Sí fue significativa la correlación entre el recuento de CD4 y la letalidad, incluyendo 18 de los 21 pacientes seropositivos para VIH (p: 0,03). Finalmente, la correlación seropositividad para VIH y letalidad también fue significativa. Veintidós pacientes respondieron a la terapia antiparasitaria con ivermectina y evolucionaron favorablemente.

PDF

https://scielo.conicyt.cl/pdf/rci/v28n3/art03.pdf

March 24, 2019 at 5:28 pm

Antimicrobial Prophylaxis for Adult Patients With Cancer-Related Immunosuppression: ASCO and IDSA Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

J Clin Oncol. 2018 Sep 4:JCO1800374

Taplitz RA, Kennedy EB, Bow EJ, et al.

Purpose

To provide an updated joint ASCO/Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guideline on antimicrobial prophylaxis for adult patients with immunosuppression associated with cancer and its treatment.

Methods

ASCO and IDSA convened an update Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of relevant studies from May 2011 to November 2016. The guideline recommendations were based on the review of evidence by the Expert Panel.

Results

Six new or updated meta-analyses and six new primary studies were added to the updated systematic review.

Recommendations

Antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis is recommended for patients who are at high risk of infection, including patients who are expected to have profound, protracted neutropenia, which is defined as < 100 neutrophils/µL for > 7 days or other risk factors. Herpes simplex virus–seropositive patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or leukemia induction therapy should receive nucleoside analog-based antiviral prophylaxis, such as acyclovir. Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis is recommended for patients receiving chemotherapy regimens that are associated with a > 3.5% risk for pneumonia as a result of this organism (eg, those with ≥ 20 mg prednisone equivalents daily for ≥ 1 month or on the basis of purine analog usage). Treatment with a nucleoside reverse transcription inhibitor (eg, entecavir or tenofovir) is recommended for patients at high risk of hepatitis B virus reactivation. Recommendations for vaccination and avoidance of prolonged contact with environments that have high concentrations of airborne fungal spores are also provided within the updated guideline. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines.

FULL TEXT

https://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.18.00374

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

 

March 20, 2019 at 3:44 pm

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