Posts filed under ‘HIV/SIDA Infecciones Oportunistas’

Visceral leishmaniasis in immunocompromised diagnostic and therapeutic approach and evaluation of the recently released IDSA guidelines.

Infez Med. 2016 Dec 1;24(4):265-271.

Pagliano P, Ascione T, Di Flumeri G, Boccia G, De Caro F.

Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is a chronic infectious disease endemic in tropical and sub-tropical areas including the Mediterranean basin, caused by a group of protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania and transmitted by phlebotomine sandflies.

Typically, VL is classified as a zoonotic infection when Leishmania infantum is the causative agent and as an anthroponotic one when L. donovani is the causative agent. Immunocompromised patients, in particular HIV positive, are considered at risk of VL.

They may present atypical signs and poor response to the treatment due to a compromission of T-helper and regulatory cells activity. Also pregnancy can be considered a condition predisposing to Leishmania reactivation and to the changes in immune response, due to a switch toward a Th2 response reported in this condition of the life.

Laboratory diagnosis is based on microscopy for parasites detection on bone-marrow or spleen aspirates. Value of serology remains high in term of sensibility, but a positive test has to be confirmed by microscopy or molecular tests.

Hypergammaglobulinemia and pancytopenia are the main alteration identified by blood examination. Treatment is based on use of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) whose administration is associated to lower incidence of side effects, in respect to antimonials and other formulations of AmB. Use of Miltefosine needs further investigation when L. infantum is the causative agent. Relapses to treatment are observed in coinfected HIV patients. They can benefit of a second cycle, but cumulative efficacy of the treatment can be low.

PDF

http://www.infezmed.it/media/journal/Vol_24_4_2016_2.pdf

January 12, 2017 at 9:02 am

2016 BHIVA GUIDELINES for the treatment of HIV-1-positive Adults with antiretroviral therapy

The British HIV Association

Writing Group

Laura Waters (Chair)

N Ahmed, B Angus, M Boffito, M Bower, D Churchill, D Dunn, S Edwards, C Emerson, S Fidler, †M Fisher, R Horne, S Khoo, C Leen, N Mackie, N Marshall, F Monteiro, M Nelson, C Orkin, A Palfreeman, S Pett, A Phillips, F Post, A Pozniak, I Reeves, C Sabin, R Trevelion, J Walsh, E Wilkins, I Williams, A Winston

†Professor Martin Fisher died in April 2015 – he made a significant contribution to these, many other guidelines and our speciality as a whole – he is greatly missed.

Introduction

The overall purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on best clinical practice in the treatment and management of adults with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy (ART).

The scope includes: (i) guidance on the initiation of ART in those previously naïve to therapy; (ii) support of people living with HIV (PLWH) on treatment; (iii) management of individuals experiencing virological failure; and (iv) recommendations in specific populations where other factors need to be taken into consideration.

The guidelines are aimed at clinical professionals directly involved with and responsible for the care of adults with HIV infection, and at community advocates responsible for promoting the best interests and care of HIV-positive adults. They should be read in conjunction with other published BHIVA guidelines.

The 2016 interim update to the 2015 BHIVA antiretroviral guidelines has been published online to include tenofovir-alafenamide/emtricitabine as a preferred NRTI backbone for first-line therapy. Changes were based on new data and the consensus opinion of the writing committee. All changes to the guideline are highlighted and include updates to the chronic kidney disease and bone disease sections of special populations and some small changes to managing virological failure. The next formal update to the guidelines in anticipated in 2017.

PDF

http://www.bhiva.org/documents/Guidelines/Treatment/2016/treatment-guidelines-2016-interim-update.pdf

December 3, 2016 at 9:33 am

The Brief Case: Cryptosporidiosis in a Severely Immunocompromised HIV Patient

Journal of Clinical Microbiology September 2016 V.54 N.9 P.2219-2221

Alessandro Rossi and Marc Roger Couturier

aDepartment of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

bARUP Laboratories, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

A 52-year-old male with AIDS was admitted to the University of Utah Hospital with chronic (>3-month duration) watery diarrhea. The patient had been diagnosed with HIV infection 3 years prior to admission but had been noncompliant with antiviral therapy since primary diagnosis. Three months prior to admission (at the time of the diarrhea onset), his CD4+ cell count was critically low (6 cells/μl), he had an elevated viral load (∼54,000 copies/ml), and he was displaying rapid deterioration of overall health. The patient also suffered from multiple other known viral complications attributable to his severe immunosuppression, including chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis and recurrent anogenital lesions caused by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2)…

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/9/2219.full.pdf+html

Closing the Brief Case: Cryptosporidiosis in a Severely Immunocompromised HIV Patient

Alessandro Rossi and Marc Roger Couturier

aDepartment of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

bARUP Laboratories, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

ANSWERS TO SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/9/2406.full.pdf+html

September 1, 2016 at 2:20 pm

Strategies to target HIV-1 in the central nervous system

Current Opinion In HIV and AIDS July 2016 V.11 N.4

Gray, Lachlan R.; Brew, Bruce J.; Churchill, Melissa J.

Strategies to target HIV-1 in the central nervous system

Gray, Lachlan R.; Brew, Bruce J.; Churchill, Melissa J.

aCenter for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute

bDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria

cDepartments of Neurology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Peter Duncan Neurosciences Unit, St Vincent’s Centre for Applied Medical Research, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales

dDepartment of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria

eDepartment of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Purpose of review

To review current knowledge of viral reservoirs in the central nervous system (CNS) and identify the CNS-specific barriers and strategies to cure human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) within the brain.

Recent findings

The cumulative data of HIV-1 infection of the CNS support the ability of the CNS to act as a viral reservoir for HIV-1. The HIV-1 viral strains found in the CNS are distinct to those found in other parts of the body. These differences have been well documented for env and also extend to the viral promoter, the long terminal repeat, and influence the ability of the virus to replicate, establish latency and respond to latency-reversing agents (LRAs). In addition, the bioavailability and activity of LRAs and antiretrovirals within the CNS suggest altered properties compared with the blood, which may influence their effectiveness. Selected LRAs were shown to have reduced effectiveness against CNS-derived viral strains compared with blood-derived strains from the same patients. Finally, altered immune surveillance within the CNS may also interfere with the efficiency of cure strategies within this compartment.

Summary

Together, these data suggest that the CNS viral reservoir is unique and presents a distinct set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure successful viral elimination within this compartment. Future studies will need to develop CNS-active LRAs and biomarkers to enable monitoring and evaluation of treatment outcomes within the CNS during HIV-1 cure clinical trials.

FULL TEXT

http://journals.lww.com/co-hivandaids/Fulltext/2016/07000/Strategies_to_target_HIV_1_in_the_central_nervous.4.aspx

PDF (CLIC in PDF)

July 29, 2016 at 7:15 pm

2016-07-14 Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents

Key Updates

What to Start: Initial Combination Regimens for the Antiretroviral-Naive Patient

The approval of 3 fixed-dose combination products containing tenofovir alafenamide (an oral prodrug of tenofovir) and emtricitabine (TAF/FTC) prompted several changes in the What to Start section. The key changes are highlighted below:

– TAF/FTC was added as a 2-NRTI option in several Recommended and Alternative regimens, as noted in Table 6 of the guidelines. The addition of TAF/FTC to these recommendations is based on data from comparative trials demonstrating that TAF-containing regimens are as effective in achieving or maintaining virologic suppression as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing regimens and with more favorable effects on markers of bone and renal health.

– In the What to Start section, the evidence quality rating “II” was expanded to include “relative bioavailability/bioequivalence studies or regimen comparisons from randomized switch studies.” This evidence rating was broadened because not all recommended regimens were evaluated in randomized, controlled trials in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients. The Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (the Panel) based their recommendations for some regimens on either data from bioequivalence or relative bioavailability studies, or by extrapolating results from randomized “switch” studies that evaluated a drug’s or regimen’s ability to maintain virologic suppression in patients whose HIV was suppressed on a previous regimen. Guidance for clinicians on choosing between abacavir (ABC)-, TAF-, and TDF-containing regimens was added to What to Start.

– The lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus 2-NRTI regimen was removed from the list of Other regimens because regimens containing this protease inhibitor (PI) combination have a larger pill burden and greater toxicity than other currently available options.

Regimen Switching

– Based on the most current data, this section was simplified to focus on switch strategies for virologically suppressed patients. The strategies are categorized as Strategies with Good Supporting Evidence, Strategies Under Evaluation, and Strategies Not Recommended.

HIV-Infected Women

– The Panel emphasizes that ART is recommended for all HIV-infected patients, including all HIV-infected women.

– The Panel also stresses the importance of early treatment for HIV-infected women during pregnancy and continuation of ART after pregnancy.

– This section was updated to include new data on interactions between antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and hormonal contraceptives.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include TAF/FTC as a treatment option for patients with HBV/HIV coinfection. Data on the virologic efficacy of TAF for the treatment of HBV in persons without HIV infection and TAF/FTC in persons with HBV/HIV coinfection are discussed.

– The Panel no longer recommends adefovir or telbivudine as options for HBV/HIV coinfected patients, as there is limited safety and efficacy data on their use in this population. In addition, these agents have a higher incidence of toxicities than other recommended treatments.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV Coinfection

– The text and Table 12 in this section were updated with information regarding the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between different ARV drugs and the recently approved hepatitis C drugs daclatasvir and the fixed-dose combination product of elbasvir and grazoprevir.

– Peginterferon alfa and ribavirin were removed from Table 12, as these agents do not have significant PK interactions with ARV drugs.

Tuberculosis (TB)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include a discussion on the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in HIV-infected persons. The added discussion notes that a 12-week course of once-weekly rifapentine and isoniazid is an option for patients receiving either an efavirenz (EFV)- or a raltegravir (RAL)-based regimen.

– This section addresses the data from the TEMPRANO and START studies demonstrating a potential role of ART in reducing TB disease.

The recommendations and discussion regarding when to initiate ART in patients with active TB were simplified.

– As rifamycins are potent inducers of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and TAF is a P-gp substrate, coadministration of TAF and rifamycins is not recommended.

Additional Updates

Minor revisions were made to the following sections:

– Laboratory Testing for Initial Assessment and Monitoring of HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

– Drug Resistance Testing

– Adverse Effects of Antiretroviral Agents and Tables 14 and 15

– Monthly Average Wholesale Price of Commonly Used Antiretroviral Drugs (Table 16)

– Drug Interaction Tables 18, 19a-e, and 20b

– Drug Characteristics Tables (Appendix B, Tables 1–7)

PDF

https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adultandadolescentgl.pdf

 

July 25, 2016 at 2:17 pm

Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults: 2016 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society–USA Panel

JAMA July 12, 2016 V.316 N.2 P.191-210

Special Communication

Huldrych F. Günthard, MD; Michael S. Saag, MD; Constance A. Benson, MD; Carlos del Rio, MD; Joseph J. Eron, MD; Joel E. Gallant, MD, MPH; Jennifer F. Hoy, MBBS, FRACP; Michael J. Mugavero, MD, MHSc; Paul E. Sax, MD; Melanie A. Thompson, MD; Rajesh T. Gandhi, MD; Raphael J. Landovitz, MD; Davey M. Smith, MD; Donna M. Jacobsen, BS; Paul A. Volberding, MD

1University Hospital Zurich and Institute of Medical Virology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

2University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham

3University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego

4Emory University Rollins School of Public Health and School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

5University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill

6Southwest CARE Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico

7Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

8Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

9AIDS Research Consortium of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia

10Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston

11University of California Los Angeles

12University of California San Diego, La Jolla

13International Antiviral Society–USA, San Francisco, California

14University of California San Francisco

Importance 

New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults.

Objective 

To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis.

Evidence

Review  A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society–USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence.

Findings 

Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory assessments are recommended before treatment, and monitoring during treatment is recommended to assess response, adverse effects, and adherence. Approaches are recommended to improve linkage to and retention in care are provided. Daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is recommended for use as preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection in persons at high risk. When indicated, postexposure prophylaxis should be started as soon as possible after exposure.

Conclusions and Relevance 

Antiretroviral agents remain the cornerstone of HIV treatment and prevention. All HIV-infected individuals with detectable plasma virus should receive treatment with recommended initial regimens consisting of an InSTI plus 2 NRTIs. Preexposure prophylaxis should be considered as part of an HIV prevention strategy for at-risk individuals. When used effectively, currently available ARVs can sustain HIV suppression and can prevent new HIV infection. With these treatment regimens, survival rates among HIV-infected adults who are retained in care can approach those of uninfected adults.

FULL TEXT

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2533073

July 17, 2016 at 4:30 pm

2016-05 Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of OIs in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents

Recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

PDF

https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adult_oi.pdf

July 2, 2016 at 10:38 pm

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