Posts filed under ‘HIV/SIDA Mujeres’

The Brief Case: A Reactive HIV Rapid Antibody Test in a Pregnant Woman

Journal of Clinical Microbiology April 2016 V.54 N.4 P.826-828

Melanie L. Yarbrough and Neil W. Anderson

A 32-year-old pregnant woman presented to her obstetrician for routine prenatal care during her 3rd month of pregnancy. She reported no major health concerns, with the exception of mild morning sickness that had been gradually improving. Upon physical examination, she appeared healthy and her vitals were stable and within normal limits.

Abdominal ultrasound revealed reassuring fetal heart tones, and her remaining physical exam was unremarkable.

She was counseled regarding the need for several routine prenatal laboratory tests, including testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), to which she agreed.

A rapid HIV test performed in the obstetrician’s office was positive for antibodies against HIV.

The positive rapid antibody result was shared with the patient. She denied any risk factors for HIV infection, including intravenous drug use and sex with multiple partners.

The obstetrician stressed that the results were only preliminary and required confirmatory testing. Prior to sending the patient home, a blood sample was drawn for submission to the local clinical laboratory for additional testing. The obstetrician called the laboratory asking how long it would take for the Western blot confirmatory test to be performed.

A representative from the testing laboratory informed him that they now used the fourth-generation algorithm and therefore no longer performed confirmatory testing by Western blot assay….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/4/826.full.pdf

February 23, 2017 at 7:54 am

2016 BHIVA GUIDELINES for the treatment of HIV-1-positive Adults with antiretroviral therapy

The British HIV Association

Writing Group

Laura Waters (Chair)

N Ahmed, B Angus, M Boffito, M Bower, D Churchill, D Dunn, S Edwards, C Emerson, S Fidler, †M Fisher, R Horne, S Khoo, C Leen, N Mackie, N Marshall, F Monteiro, M Nelson, C Orkin, A Palfreeman, S Pett, A Phillips, F Post, A Pozniak, I Reeves, C Sabin, R Trevelion, J Walsh, E Wilkins, I Williams, A Winston

†Professor Martin Fisher died in April 2015 – he made a significant contribution to these, many other guidelines and our speciality as a whole – he is greatly missed.

Introduction

The overall purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on best clinical practice in the treatment and management of adults with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy (ART).

The scope includes: (i) guidance on the initiation of ART in those previously naïve to therapy; (ii) support of people living with HIV (PLWH) on treatment; (iii) management of individuals experiencing virological failure; and (iv) recommendations in specific populations where other factors need to be taken into consideration.

The guidelines are aimed at clinical professionals directly involved with and responsible for the care of adults with HIV infection, and at community advocates responsible for promoting the best interests and care of HIV-positive adults. They should be read in conjunction with other published BHIVA guidelines.

The 2016 interim update to the 2015 BHIVA antiretroviral guidelines has been published online to include tenofovir-alafenamide/emtricitabine as a preferred NRTI backbone for first-line therapy. Changes were based on new data and the consensus opinion of the writing committee. All changes to the guideline are highlighted and include updates to the chronic kidney disease and bone disease sections of special populations and some small changes to managing virological failure. The next formal update to the guidelines in anticipated in 2017.

PDF

http://www.bhiva.org/documents/Guidelines/Treatment/2016/treatment-guidelines-2016-interim-update.pdf

December 3, 2016 at 9:33 am

2016-07-14 Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents

Key Updates

What to Start: Initial Combination Regimens for the Antiretroviral-Naive Patient

The approval of 3 fixed-dose combination products containing tenofovir alafenamide (an oral prodrug of tenofovir) and emtricitabine (TAF/FTC) prompted several changes in the What to Start section. The key changes are highlighted below:

– TAF/FTC was added as a 2-NRTI option in several Recommended and Alternative regimens, as noted in Table 6 of the guidelines. The addition of TAF/FTC to these recommendations is based on data from comparative trials demonstrating that TAF-containing regimens are as effective in achieving or maintaining virologic suppression as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing regimens and with more favorable effects on markers of bone and renal health.

– In the What to Start section, the evidence quality rating “II” was expanded to include “relative bioavailability/bioequivalence studies or regimen comparisons from randomized switch studies.” This evidence rating was broadened because not all recommended regimens were evaluated in randomized, controlled trials in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients. The Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (the Panel) based their recommendations for some regimens on either data from bioequivalence or relative bioavailability studies, or by extrapolating results from randomized “switch” studies that evaluated a drug’s or regimen’s ability to maintain virologic suppression in patients whose HIV was suppressed on a previous regimen. Guidance for clinicians on choosing between abacavir (ABC)-, TAF-, and TDF-containing regimens was added to What to Start.

– The lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus 2-NRTI regimen was removed from the list of Other regimens because regimens containing this protease inhibitor (PI) combination have a larger pill burden and greater toxicity than other currently available options.

Regimen Switching

– Based on the most current data, this section was simplified to focus on switch strategies for virologically suppressed patients. The strategies are categorized as Strategies with Good Supporting Evidence, Strategies Under Evaluation, and Strategies Not Recommended.

HIV-Infected Women

– The Panel emphasizes that ART is recommended for all HIV-infected patients, including all HIV-infected women.

– The Panel also stresses the importance of early treatment for HIV-infected women during pregnancy and continuation of ART after pregnancy.

– This section was updated to include new data on interactions between antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and hormonal contraceptives.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include TAF/FTC as a treatment option for patients with HBV/HIV coinfection. Data on the virologic efficacy of TAF for the treatment of HBV in persons without HIV infection and TAF/FTC in persons with HBV/HIV coinfection are discussed.

– The Panel no longer recommends adefovir or telbivudine as options for HBV/HIV coinfected patients, as there is limited safety and efficacy data on their use in this population. In addition, these agents have a higher incidence of toxicities than other recommended treatments.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV Coinfection

– The text and Table 12 in this section were updated with information regarding the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between different ARV drugs and the recently approved hepatitis C drugs daclatasvir and the fixed-dose combination product of elbasvir and grazoprevir.

– Peginterferon alfa and ribavirin were removed from Table 12, as these agents do not have significant PK interactions with ARV drugs.

Tuberculosis (TB)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include a discussion on the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in HIV-infected persons. The added discussion notes that a 12-week course of once-weekly rifapentine and isoniazid is an option for patients receiving either an efavirenz (EFV)- or a raltegravir (RAL)-based regimen.

– This section addresses the data from the TEMPRANO and START studies demonstrating a potential role of ART in reducing TB disease.

The recommendations and discussion regarding when to initiate ART in patients with active TB were simplified.

– As rifamycins are potent inducers of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and TAF is a P-gp substrate, coadministration of TAF and rifamycins is not recommended.

Additional Updates

Minor revisions were made to the following sections:

– Laboratory Testing for Initial Assessment and Monitoring of HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

– Drug Resistance Testing

– Adverse Effects of Antiretroviral Agents and Tables 14 and 15

– Monthly Average Wholesale Price of Commonly Used Antiretroviral Drugs (Table 16)

– Drug Interaction Tables 18, 19a-e, and 20b

– Drug Characteristics Tables (Appendix B, Tables 1–7)

PDF

https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adultandadolescentgl.pdf

 

July 25, 2016 at 2:17 pm

Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults: 2016 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society–USA Panel

JAMA July 12, 2016 V.316 N.2 P.191-210

Special Communication

Huldrych F. Günthard, MD; Michael S. Saag, MD; Constance A. Benson, MD; Carlos del Rio, MD; Joseph J. Eron, MD; Joel E. Gallant, MD, MPH; Jennifer F. Hoy, MBBS, FRACP; Michael J. Mugavero, MD, MHSc; Paul E. Sax, MD; Melanie A. Thompson, MD; Rajesh T. Gandhi, MD; Raphael J. Landovitz, MD; Davey M. Smith, MD; Donna M. Jacobsen, BS; Paul A. Volberding, MD

1University Hospital Zurich and Institute of Medical Virology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

2University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham

3University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego

4Emory University Rollins School of Public Health and School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

5University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill

6Southwest CARE Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico

7Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

8Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

9AIDS Research Consortium of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia

10Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston

11University of California Los Angeles

12University of California San Diego, La Jolla

13International Antiviral Society–USA, San Francisco, California

14University of California San Francisco

Importance 

New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults.

Objective 

To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis.

Evidence

Review  A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society–USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence.

Findings 

Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory assessments are recommended before treatment, and monitoring during treatment is recommended to assess response, adverse effects, and adherence. Approaches are recommended to improve linkage to and retention in care are provided. Daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is recommended for use as preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection in persons at high risk. When indicated, postexposure prophylaxis should be started as soon as possible after exposure.

Conclusions and Relevance 

Antiretroviral agents remain the cornerstone of HIV treatment and prevention. All HIV-infected individuals with detectable plasma virus should receive treatment with recommended initial regimens consisting of an InSTI plus 2 NRTIs. Preexposure prophylaxis should be considered as part of an HIV prevention strategy for at-risk individuals. When used effectively, currently available ARVs can sustain HIV suppression and can prevent new HIV infection. With these treatment regimens, survival rates among HIV-infected adults who are retained in care can approach those of uninfected adults.

FULL TEXT

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2533073

July 17, 2016 at 4:30 pm

Sexual Activity Without Condoms and Risk of HIV Transmission in Serodifferent Couples When the HIV-Positive Partner Is Using Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

JAMA July 12, 2016 V.316 N.2 P.171-181

Alison J. Rodger, MD; Valentina Cambiano, PhD; Tina Bruun, RN; Pietro Vernazza, MD; Simon Collins; Jan van Lunzen, PhD; Giulio Maria Corbelli; Vicente Estrada, MD; Anna Maria Geretti, MD; Apostolos Beloukas, PhD; David Asboe, FRCP; Pompeyo Viciana, MD; Félix Gutiérrez, MD; Bonaventura Clotet, PhD; Christian Pradier, MD; Jan Gerstoft, MD; Rainer Weber, MD; Katarina Westling, MD; Gilles Wandeler, MD; Jan M. Prins, PhD; Armin Rieger, MD; Marcel Stoeckle, MD; Tim Kümmerle, PhD; Teresa Bini, MD; Adriana Ammassari, MD; Richard Gilson, MD; Ivanka Krznaric, PhD; Matti Ristola, PhD; Robert Zangerle, MD; Pia Handberg, RN; Antonio Antela, PhD; Sris Allan, FRCP; Andrew N. Phillips, PhD; Jens Lundgren, MD; for the PARTNER Study Group

1Research Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom

2Department of Infectious Diseases/CHIP, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

3Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, Cantonal Hospital, St Gallen, Switzerland

4HIV i-Base, London, United Kingdom

5University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany

6European AIDS Treatment Group, Bruxelles, Belgium

7Hospital Clinico San Carlos and Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain

8Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom

9Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom

10Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Spain

11Hospital General de Elche & Universidad Miguel Hernández, Alicante, Spain

12IrsiCaixa Foundation, UAB, UVIC-UCC, Hospital Universitari “Germans Trias i Pujol,” Badalona, Catalonia, Spain

13Department of Public Health, Nice University Hospital and EA 6312, University Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France

14Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark

15Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

16Unit of Infectious Diseases and Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, and Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

17Department of Infectious Diseases, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

18Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

19Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

20Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland

21Department of Internal Medicine 1, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany

22Ospedal San Paolo, Milan, Italy

23Ospedale L. Spallanzani, Roma, Italy

24Praxis Driesener Straße, Berlin, Germany

25Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland

26Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria

27Hvidovre Universitets Hospital, Hvidovre, Denamrk

28Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain

29Coventry and Warwickshire Hospital, Coventry, United Kingdom

Importance 

A key factor in assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as a prevention strategy is the absolute risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex with suppressed HIV-1 RNA viral load for both anal and vaginal sex.

Objective 

To evaluate the rate of within-couple HIV transmission (heterosexual and men who have sex with men [MSM]) during periods of sex without condoms and when the HIV-positive partner had HIV-1 RNA load less than 200 copies/mL.

Design, Setting, and Participants 

The prospective, observational PARTNER (Partners of People on ART—A New Evaluation of the Risks) study was conducted at 75 clinical sites in 14 European countries and enrolled 1166 HIV serodifferent couples (HIV-positive partner taking suppressive ART) who reported condomless sex (September 2010 to May 2014). Eligibility criteria for inclusion of couple-years of follow-up were condomless sex and HIV-1 RNA load less than 200 copies/mL. Anonymized phylogenetic analysis compared couples’ HIV-1 polymerase and envelope sequences if an HIV-negative partner became infected to determine phylogenetically linked transmissions.

Exposures 

Condomless sexual activity with an HIV-positive partner taking virally suppressive ART.

Main Outcomes and Measures 

Risk of within-couple HIV transmission to the HIV-negative partner

Results 

Among 1166 enrolled couples, 888 (mean age, 42 years [IQR, 35-48]; 548 heterosexual [61.7%] and 340 MSM [38.3%]) provided 1238 eligible couple-years of follow-up (median follow-up, 1.3 years [IQR, 0.8-2.0]). At baseline, couples reported condomless sex for a median of 2 years (IQR, 0.5-6.3). Condomless sex with other partners was reported by 108 HIV-negative MSM (33%) and 21 heterosexuals (4%). During follow-up, couples reported condomless sex a median of 37 times per year (IQR, 15-71), with MSM couples reporting approximately 22 000 condomless sex acts and heterosexuals approximately 36 000. Although 11 HIV-negative partners became HIV-positive (10 MSM; 1 heterosexual; 8 reported condomless sex with other partners), no phylogenetically linked transmissions occurred over eligible couple-years of follow-up, giving a rate of within-couple HIV transmission of zero, with an upper 95% confidence limit of 0.30/100 couple-years of follow-up. The upper 95% confidence limit for condomless anal sex was 0.71 per 100 couple-years of follow-up.

Conclusions and Relevance 

Among serodifferent heterosexual and MSM couples in which the HIV-positive partner was using suppressive ART and who reported condomless sex, during median follow-up of 1.3 years per couple, there were no documented cases of within-couple HIV transmission (upper 95% confidence limit, 0.30/100 couple-years of follow-up). Additional longer-term follow-up is necessary to provide more precise estimates of risk.

FULL TEXT

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2533066

July 17, 2016 at 4:28 pm

Condomless Sex With Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Individuals: How Safe Is It?

JAMA July 12, 2016 V.316 N.2 P.149-151

Editorial

Eric S. Daar, MD; Katya Corado, MD

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Division of HIV Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California

The use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) across the globe has had a profound influence on the natural history of HIV infection. Although the pandemic continues to spread, one of the greatest advances in prevention since the use of ART in pregnancy to avoid vertical transmission was the recognition that the same treatment prevents horizontal transmission. Many cohorts have suggested this benefit,1,2 findings that in part led to the Swiss Commission statement in 2008 that HIV-infected individuals who have had suppressed plasma HIV RNA load for longer than 6 months and who do not have sexually transmitted infections (STIs) were not sexually infectious.3 Although the statement was controversial at the time, the cohort data were compelling, and there have been very few case reports of an HIV transmission event from a virologically suppressed person and no events identified in a systemic review of patients with suppressed plasma HIV RNA load in cohort studies and randomized controlled trials…

FULL TEXT

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2533043

July 17, 2016 at 4:24 pm

Pregnancy and susceptibility to infectious diseases.

Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2013;2013:752852.

Sappenfield E1, Jamieson DJ, Kourtis AP.

Author information

1Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

Abstract

To summarize the literature regarding susceptibility of pregnant women to infectious diseases and severity of resulting disease, we conducted a review using a PubMed search and other strategies. Studies were included if they reported information on infection risk or disease outcome in pregnant women.

In all, 1454 abstracts were reviewed, and a total of 85 studies were included. Data were extracted regarding number of cases in pregnant women, rates of infection, risk factors for disease severity or complications, and maternal outcomes.

The evidence indicates that pregnancy is associated with increased severity of some infectious diseases, such as influenza, malaria, hepatitis E, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection (risk for dissemination/hepatitis); there is also some evidence for increased severity of measles and smallpox.

Disease severity seems higher with advanced pregnancy. Pregnant women may be more susceptible to acquisition of malaria, HIV infection, and listeriosis, although the evidence is limited. These results reinforce the importance of infection prevention as well as of early identification and treatment of suspected influenza, malaria, hepatitis E, and HSV disease during pregnancy.

PDF

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3723080/pdf/IDOG2013-752852.pdf

August 15, 2015 at 5:29 pm

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