Posts filed under ‘HIV/SIDA Mujeres’

Risk of HIV Acquisition During Pregnancy and Postpartum: A Call for Action

The Journal of Infectious Diseases July 1, 2018 V.218 N.1 P.1-4

EDITOR’S CHOICE

Lynne M Mofenson

Prospective studies exploring the relationship between pregnancy and HIV acquisition in women have had inconsistent results, with some studies documenting an increased risk [1–3], while others finding no increase in risk — or even lower risk — after controlling for sexual behavior and other confounding factors such as sexually transmitted infections [4–7]. A meta-analysis of 19 cohort studies estimated a pooled HIV incidence during pregnancy and postpartum of 3.9 per 100 person-years (4.7 per 100 person-years during pregnancy and 2.9 per 100 person-years postpartum) [8], similar to that defined as “substantial risk” in nonpregnant individuals, such as female sex workers, by the World Health Organization (WHO) [9]. The pooled meta-analysis reported that HIV incidence was not significantly higher among pregnant or postpartum women than among nonpregnant/nonpostpartum women, but only 5 studies had appropriate data and were not able to control for a variety of confounding factors, limiting the power to detect associations…

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/218/1/1/4913312

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

August 13, 2018 at 6:15 pm

Protecting Mothers and Babies — A Delicate Balancing Act

N Engl J of Medicine July 24, 2018

PERSEPCTIVE

Protecting Mothers and Babies — A Delicate Balancing Act

S.A. Rasmussen, W. Barfield, and M.A. Honein

More than 50 years ago, an epidemic of serious birth defects caused by prenatal exposure to thalidomide shattered the prevailing notion that the placenta served as a barrier against damaging influences and led to recognition that exposures during pregnancy can result in harm to a developing fetus. Since that time, ensuring that a pregnant woman has access to potentially lifesaving treatments while safeguarding her fetus has become a delicate balancing act, one that requires a careful evaluation of risks and benefits to both the mother and her fetus…

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1809688?query=RP

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1809688

 

 

 

N Engl J of Medicine July 24, 2018

CORRESPONDENCE

Neural-Tube Defects with Dolutegravir Treatment from the Time of Conception

  1. Zash, J. Makhema, and R.L. Shapiro

Since August 2014, the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership has conducted birth outcome surveillance at eight government hospitals throughout Botswana. A primary ongoing aim of the surveillance is to evaluate the prevalence of neural-tube defects associated with exposure to antiretroviral drugs from the time of conception (the risk period for neural-tube defects ends approximately 28 days after conception). At each site, trained government midwives perform surface examinations of consecutive live-born and stillborn infants who are born in the hospital to women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to women without HIV infection. As part of …

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc1807653?query=RP

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMc1807653

July 24, 2018 at 11:44 am

Comparative safety of dolutegravir-based or efavirenz-based antiretroviral treatment started during pregnancy in Botswana: an observational study.

Lancet Glob Health. July 2018 V.6 N.7 P.e804-e810.

Zash R1, Jacobson DL2, Diseko M3, Mayondi G3, Mmalane M3, Essex M4, Gaolethe T3, Petlo C5, Lockman S6, Holmes LB7, Makhema J3, Shapiro RL4.

Author information

1 Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Division of Infectious Disease, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: rzash@bidmc.harvard.edu.

2 Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

3 Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership, Gaborone, Botswana.

4 Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

5 Botswana Ministry of Health, Gaborone, Botswana.

6 Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

7 Medical Genetics Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Global rollout of dolutegravir-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been hampered in part by insufficient safety data in pregnancy. We compared birth outcomes among women initiating dolutegravir-based ART with those among women initiating efavirenz-based ART in pregnancy in Botswana.

METHODS:

In this observational study, we captured birth outcome data at eight government hospitals throughout Botswana (~45% of all deliveries in the country) in an ongoing study that started on Aug 15, 2014. In 2016, Botswana changed first-line ART from efavirenz-tenofovir-emtricitabine to dolutegravir-tenofovir-emtricitabine, including for pregnant women. This analysis includes women starting either efavirenz-based ART or dolutegravir-based ART during singleton pregnancy (regimen started and delivery occurring between Aug 15, 2014, and Aug 15, 2016, for efavirenz-based ART and between Nov 1, 2016, and Sept 30, 2017, for dolutegravir-based ART). We excluded births to mothers who had switched regimen or stopped ART. The primary outcomes were the combined endpoints of any adverse outcome (stillbirth, preterm birth [<37 weeks’ gestation], small for gestational age [SGA; less than the tenth percentile of birthweight by gestational age], or neonatal death [within 28 days of age]) and severe adverse outcomes (stillbirth, neonatal death, very preterm birth [<32 weeks’ gestation], and very SGA [less than the third percentile of birthweight by gestational age]). We fitted log-binomial regression models, controlling for maternal age, gravidity, and education, to estimate adjusted risk ratios (aRRs).

FINDINGS:

Our analysis included 1729 pregnant women who initiated dolutegravir-based ART and 4593 who initiated efavirenz-based ART. The risk for any adverse birth outcome among women on dolutegravir versus efavirenz was similar (33·2% vs 35·0%; aRR 0·95, 95% CI 0·88-1·03), as was the risk of any severe birth outcome (10·7% vs 11·3%; 0·94, 0·81-1·11). We found no significant differences by regimen in the individual outcomes of stillbirth, neonatal death, preterm birth, very preterm birth, SGA, or very SGA.

INTERPRETATION:

Adverse birth outcomes were similar among pregnant women who initiated dolutegravir-based and efavirenz-based ART. Dolutegravir-based ART can be safely initiated in pregnancy.

FUNDING: National Institutes of Health.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(18)30218-3/fulltext

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/langlo/PIIS2214-109X(18)30218-3.pdf

June 26, 2018 at 7:58 am

Antiretroviral therapy in pregnant women living with HIV: A clinical practice guideline.

BMJ 2017 Sep 11; 358:j3961.

Siemieniuk RAC et al.

Approximately 1.4 million women living with HIV become pregnant every year. Most women use antiretroviral therapy, to reduce the risk of vertical transmission or for personal health reasons. Using the GRADE framework according to the BMJ Rapid Recommendation process, we make recommendations for optimal choice of combination antiretroviral regimen considering patient values and preferences, the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, their uncertainty, and practical issues. We suggest a zidovudine and lamivudine-based regimen over one that includes tenofovir or emtricitabine (weak recommendation). We recommend alternatives over the combination of tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir/ritonavir (strong recommendation).

FULL TEXT

http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3961

PDF

http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/358/bmj.j3961.full.pdf

October 5, 2017 at 9:52 am

The Brief Case: A Reactive HIV Rapid Antibody Test in a Pregnant Woman

Journal of Clinical Microbiology April 2016 V.54 N.4 P.826-828

Melanie L. Yarbrough and Neil W. Anderson

A 32-year-old pregnant woman presented to her obstetrician for routine prenatal care during her 3rd month of pregnancy. She reported no major health concerns, with the exception of mild morning sickness that had been gradually improving. Upon physical examination, she appeared healthy and her vitals were stable and within normal limits.

Abdominal ultrasound revealed reassuring fetal heart tones, and her remaining physical exam was unremarkable.

She was counseled regarding the need for several routine prenatal laboratory tests, including testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), to which she agreed.

A rapid HIV test performed in the obstetrician’s office was positive for antibodies against HIV.

The positive rapid antibody result was shared with the patient. She denied any risk factors for HIV infection, including intravenous drug use and sex with multiple partners.

The obstetrician stressed that the results were only preliminary and required confirmatory testing. Prior to sending the patient home, a blood sample was drawn for submission to the local clinical laboratory for additional testing. The obstetrician called the laboratory asking how long it would take for the Western blot confirmatory test to be performed.

A representative from the testing laboratory informed him that they now used the fourth-generation algorithm and therefore no longer performed confirmatory testing by Western blot assay….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/54/4/826.full.pdf

February 23, 2017 at 7:54 am

2016 BHIVA GUIDELINES for the treatment of HIV-1-positive Adults with antiretroviral therapy

The British HIV Association

Writing Group

Laura Waters (Chair)

N Ahmed, B Angus, M Boffito, M Bower, D Churchill, D Dunn, S Edwards, C Emerson, S Fidler, †M Fisher, R Horne, S Khoo, C Leen, N Mackie, N Marshall, F Monteiro, M Nelson, C Orkin, A Palfreeman, S Pett, A Phillips, F Post, A Pozniak, I Reeves, C Sabin, R Trevelion, J Walsh, E Wilkins, I Williams, A Winston

†Professor Martin Fisher died in April 2015 – he made a significant contribution to these, many other guidelines and our speciality as a whole – he is greatly missed.

Introduction

The overall purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on best clinical practice in the treatment and management of adults with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy (ART).

The scope includes: (i) guidance on the initiation of ART in those previously naïve to therapy; (ii) support of people living with HIV (PLWH) on treatment; (iii) management of individuals experiencing virological failure; and (iv) recommendations in specific populations where other factors need to be taken into consideration.

The guidelines are aimed at clinical professionals directly involved with and responsible for the care of adults with HIV infection, and at community advocates responsible for promoting the best interests and care of HIV-positive adults. They should be read in conjunction with other published BHIVA guidelines.

The 2016 interim update to the 2015 BHIVA antiretroviral guidelines has been published online to include tenofovir-alafenamide/emtricitabine as a preferred NRTI backbone for first-line therapy. Changes were based on new data and the consensus opinion of the writing committee. All changes to the guideline are highlighted and include updates to the chronic kidney disease and bone disease sections of special populations and some small changes to managing virological failure. The next formal update to the guidelines in anticipated in 2017.

PDF

http://www.bhiva.org/documents/Guidelines/Treatment/2016/treatment-guidelines-2016-interim-update.pdf

December 3, 2016 at 9:33 am

2016-07-14 Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents

Key Updates

What to Start: Initial Combination Regimens for the Antiretroviral-Naive Patient

The approval of 3 fixed-dose combination products containing tenofovir alafenamide (an oral prodrug of tenofovir) and emtricitabine (TAF/FTC) prompted several changes in the What to Start section. The key changes are highlighted below:

– TAF/FTC was added as a 2-NRTI option in several Recommended and Alternative regimens, as noted in Table 6 of the guidelines. The addition of TAF/FTC to these recommendations is based on data from comparative trials demonstrating that TAF-containing regimens are as effective in achieving or maintaining virologic suppression as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing regimens and with more favorable effects on markers of bone and renal health.

– In the What to Start section, the evidence quality rating “II” was expanded to include “relative bioavailability/bioequivalence studies or regimen comparisons from randomized switch studies.” This evidence rating was broadened because not all recommended regimens were evaluated in randomized, controlled trials in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients. The Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (the Panel) based their recommendations for some regimens on either data from bioequivalence or relative bioavailability studies, or by extrapolating results from randomized “switch” studies that evaluated a drug’s or regimen’s ability to maintain virologic suppression in patients whose HIV was suppressed on a previous regimen. Guidance for clinicians on choosing between abacavir (ABC)-, TAF-, and TDF-containing regimens was added to What to Start.

– The lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus 2-NRTI regimen was removed from the list of Other regimens because regimens containing this protease inhibitor (PI) combination have a larger pill burden and greater toxicity than other currently available options.

Regimen Switching

– Based on the most current data, this section was simplified to focus on switch strategies for virologically suppressed patients. The strategies are categorized as Strategies with Good Supporting Evidence, Strategies Under Evaluation, and Strategies Not Recommended.

HIV-Infected Women

– The Panel emphasizes that ART is recommended for all HIV-infected patients, including all HIV-infected women.

– The Panel also stresses the importance of early treatment for HIV-infected women during pregnancy and continuation of ART after pregnancy.

– This section was updated to include new data on interactions between antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and hormonal contraceptives.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include TAF/FTC as a treatment option for patients with HBV/HIV coinfection. Data on the virologic efficacy of TAF for the treatment of HBV in persons without HIV infection and TAF/FTC in persons with HBV/HIV coinfection are discussed.

– The Panel no longer recommends adefovir or telbivudine as options for HBV/HIV coinfected patients, as there is limited safety and efficacy data on their use in this population. In addition, these agents have a higher incidence of toxicities than other recommended treatments.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV Coinfection

– The text and Table 12 in this section were updated with information regarding the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between different ARV drugs and the recently approved hepatitis C drugs daclatasvir and the fixed-dose combination product of elbasvir and grazoprevir.

– Peginterferon alfa and ribavirin were removed from Table 12, as these agents do not have significant PK interactions with ARV drugs.

Tuberculosis (TB)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include a discussion on the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in HIV-infected persons. The added discussion notes that a 12-week course of once-weekly rifapentine and isoniazid is an option for patients receiving either an efavirenz (EFV)- or a raltegravir (RAL)-based regimen.

– This section addresses the data from the TEMPRANO and START studies demonstrating a potential role of ART in reducing TB disease.

The recommendations and discussion regarding when to initiate ART in patients with active TB were simplified.

– As rifamycins are potent inducers of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and TAF is a P-gp substrate, coadministration of TAF and rifamycins is not recommended.

Additional Updates

Minor revisions were made to the following sections:

– Laboratory Testing for Initial Assessment and Monitoring of HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

– Drug Resistance Testing

– Adverse Effects of Antiretroviral Agents and Tables 14 and 15

– Monthly Average Wholesale Price of Commonly Used Antiretroviral Drugs (Table 16)

– Drug Interaction Tables 18, 19a-e, and 20b

– Drug Characteristics Tables (Appendix B, Tables 1–7)

PDF

https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adultandadolescentgl.pdf

 

July 25, 2016 at 2:17 pm

Older Posts Newer Posts


Calendar

April 2020
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category