Posts filed under ‘HIV/SIDA Trastornos Neurológicos’

Radiological characteristics of pulmonary cryptococcosis in HIV-infected patients.

PLoS One. March 16, 2017 V.12 N.3 P.:e0173858.

Hu Z1, Chen J2, Wang J3, Xiong Q1, Zhong Y1, Yang Y1, Xu C4, Wei H1.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated pulmonary cryptococcosis (PC) is largely based on studies performed about 2 decades ago which reported that the most common findings on chest radiograph were diffuse interstitial infiltrates. Few studies are available regarding the computed tomography (CT) findings. The aim of this study was to characterize chest CT features of HIV-associated PC.

METHODS:

HIV patients with cryptococccal infection and pulmonary abnormalities on Chest CT between September 2010 and May 2016 in the Second Affiliated Hospital of the Southeast University were retrospectively analyzed. Confirmed cases of tumors, mycobacterial infections and other fungal infections were excluded from the analysis.

RESULTS:

60 cases were identified. The median CD4 T-cell counts were 20 cells/μL (range, 0-205 cells/μL). Chest CT scans demonstrated nodular lesions in 93.3% of the studied patients. Those nodular lesions were usually cavitated and solitary nodule was the most common form. Pleural effusions and pneumonic infiltrates occurred in 11.6% and 31.7% of the cases respectively. Those lesions were usually had co-existing nodular lesions. Etiological analysis suggested that 76.8% of the nodular lesions could have a relationship with PC that 12.5% of the nodular lesions were “laboratory-confirmed” cases, 48.2% were “clinically confirmed” cases and 16.1% were “clinically probable” cases. 85.7% of the pleural effusions could be “clinically confirmed” cases of PC. At least, 38.5% of the diffuse pneumonic infiltrates may be clinically attributed to pneumocystis pneumonia.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggested that pulmonary nodules but not diffuse pneumonia are the most common radiological characteristics of HIV-associated PC. HIV-infected patients with pulmonary nodules on Chest CT should particularly be screened for cryptococcal infection

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5354418/pdf/pone.0173858.pdf

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November 25, 2018 at 9:40 am

Pulmonary Cryptococcosis – Localized and Disseminated Infections in 27 Patients with AIDS.

Clinical Infectious Diseases September 1995 V.21 N.3 P.628–633

Marie-Caroline Meyohas; Patricia Roux; Diane Bollens; Christos Chouaid; Willy Rozenbaum …

We reviewed the records of 85 patients infected with both human immunodeficiency virus and Cryptococcus neoformans.

Twenty-seven patients (32%) had pulmonary cryptococcosis.

C. neoformans was cultured from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or pleural fluid in 25 cases; the remaining two patients had cryptococcal antigen (CA) detected in BAL fluid and C. neoformans cultured from other sites.

All but one of the 27 patients had detectable CA in serum.

The CD4+ lymphocyte count was low in all cases (median, 24/mm3). Clinical manifestations of pulmonary cryptococcosis included fever (94%), cough (71%), dyspnea (7%), expectoration (4%), chest pain (2%), and hemoptysis (1%).

Diffuse interstitial opacities (70.5%), focal interstitial abnormalities, alveolar opacities, adenopathies, cavitary lesions, and pleural effusions were evident.

Outcome was poor (mean survival time, 23 weeks) despite treatment.

Patients with localized pulmonary cryptococcosis appeared to have a higher CD4+ lymphocyte count, an earlier diagnosis, lower serum CA titers, fewer previous or concomitant infections, and a better prognosis than patients with disseminated cryptococcosis.

abstract

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-abstract/21/3/628/362645?redirectedFrom=fulltext

PDF

https://doi.org/10.1093/clinids/21.3.628

 

November 24, 2018 at 8:03 pm

Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection in HIV-1-Infected Patients

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome May 1990 V.3  N.5 P.480-484

Clark, Rebecca A.; Greer, Donald L.; Valainis, Gregory T…..

Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a frequent pathogen in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1).

We review the initial presentation and clinical course of 18 HIV-1-infected (HIV +) patients with a Cn pulmonary infection. Simultaneous positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures were found in 10 (63%) of 16 examined.

The most frequent presenting symptoms were fever (87%) and pulmonary complaints (60%).

Although the most common chest radiographic finding was bilateral diffuse interstitial infiltrates, nodules and cavitary lesions were also seen. Nine (50%) of the 18 patients died within 6 weeks of diagnosis.

Of six patients with an isolated Cn pulmonary infection, five have subsequently died.

Three of these five patients did not receive maintenance therapy and had confirmed or probable relapse.

Patients initially presenting with an isolated Cn pulmonary infection may later show disseminated disease, suggesting that such patients should receive both acute and maintenance therapy.

abstract

https://journals.lww.com/jaids/Abstract/1990/05000/Cryptococcus_neoformans_Pulmonary_Infection_in.3.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

November 24, 2018 at 8:01 pm

2017-07 Guidelines for the managing advanced HIV disease and rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy. WHO 56 pags

Overview

The objectives of these guidelines are to provide recommendations outlining a public health approach to managing people presenting with advanced HIV disease, and to provide guidance on the timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all people living with HIV.

The first set of recommendations addresses the specific needs of people with advanced HIV disease and defines a package of interventions aimed at reducing HIV-associated morbidity and mortality. WHO recommends that a package of screening, prophylaxis, rapid ART initiation and intensified adherence interventions be offered to everyone living with HIV presenting with advanced disease. This is a strong recommendation that applies to all populations and age groups. The guidelines also include an algorithm to support decision making for providing care for people with advanced HIV disease.

The second set of recommendations defines how rapidly ART should be initiated within the context of the “treat all” policy, especially when coinfections are present. WHO strongly recommends that rapid ART initiation should be offered to people living with HIV following confirmed diagnosis and clinical assessment. Rapid initiation of ART is defined as within seven days of HIV diagnosis. WHO further strongly recommends ART initiation on the same day as HIV diagnosis based on the person’s willingness and readiness to start ART immediately, unless there are clinical reasons to delay treatment. Both of these recommendations apply to all populations and age groups. People with advanced HIV disease should be given priority for clinical assessment and treatment initiation.

PDF

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/255884/1/9789241550062-eng.pdf?ua=1

August 7, 2017 at 9:56 am

2016 BHIVA GUIDELINES for the treatment of HIV-1-positive Adults with antiretroviral therapy

The British HIV Association

Writing Group

Laura Waters (Chair)

N Ahmed, B Angus, M Boffito, M Bower, D Churchill, D Dunn, S Edwards, C Emerson, S Fidler, †M Fisher, R Horne, S Khoo, C Leen, N Mackie, N Marshall, F Monteiro, M Nelson, C Orkin, A Palfreeman, S Pett, A Phillips, F Post, A Pozniak, I Reeves, C Sabin, R Trevelion, J Walsh, E Wilkins, I Williams, A Winston

†Professor Martin Fisher died in April 2015 – he made a significant contribution to these, many other guidelines and our speciality as a whole – he is greatly missed.

Introduction

The overall purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on best clinical practice in the treatment and management of adults with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy (ART).

The scope includes: (i) guidance on the initiation of ART in those previously naïve to therapy; (ii) support of people living with HIV (PLWH) on treatment; (iii) management of individuals experiencing virological failure; and (iv) recommendations in specific populations where other factors need to be taken into consideration.

The guidelines are aimed at clinical professionals directly involved with and responsible for the care of adults with HIV infection, and at community advocates responsible for promoting the best interests and care of HIV-positive adults. They should be read in conjunction with other published BHIVA guidelines.

The 2016 interim update to the 2015 BHIVA antiretroviral guidelines has been published online to include tenofovir-alafenamide/emtricitabine as a preferred NRTI backbone for first-line therapy. Changes were based on new data and the consensus opinion of the writing committee. All changes to the guideline are highlighted and include updates to the chronic kidney disease and bone disease sections of special populations and some small changes to managing virological failure. The next formal update to the guidelines in anticipated in 2017.

PDF

http://www.bhiva.org/documents/Guidelines/Treatment/2016/treatment-guidelines-2016-interim-update.pdf

December 3, 2016 at 9:33 am

Strategies to target HIV-1 in the central nervous system

Current Opinion In HIV and AIDS July 2016 V.11 N.4

Gray, Lachlan R.; Brew, Bruce J.; Churchill, Melissa J.

Strategies to target HIV-1 in the central nervous system

Gray, Lachlan R.; Brew, Bruce J.; Churchill, Melissa J.

aCenter for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute

bDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria

cDepartments of Neurology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Peter Duncan Neurosciences Unit, St Vincent’s Centre for Applied Medical Research, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales

dDepartment of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria

eDepartment of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Purpose of review

To review current knowledge of viral reservoirs in the central nervous system (CNS) and identify the CNS-specific barriers and strategies to cure human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) within the brain.

Recent findings

The cumulative data of HIV-1 infection of the CNS support the ability of the CNS to act as a viral reservoir for HIV-1. The HIV-1 viral strains found in the CNS are distinct to those found in other parts of the body. These differences have been well documented for env and also extend to the viral promoter, the long terminal repeat, and influence the ability of the virus to replicate, establish latency and respond to latency-reversing agents (LRAs). In addition, the bioavailability and activity of LRAs and antiretrovirals within the CNS suggest altered properties compared with the blood, which may influence their effectiveness. Selected LRAs were shown to have reduced effectiveness against CNS-derived viral strains compared with blood-derived strains from the same patients. Finally, altered immune surveillance within the CNS may also interfere with the efficiency of cure strategies within this compartment.

Summary

Together, these data suggest that the CNS viral reservoir is unique and presents a distinct set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure successful viral elimination within this compartment. Future studies will need to develop CNS-active LRAs and biomarkers to enable monitoring and evaluation of treatment outcomes within the CNS during HIV-1 cure clinical trials.

FULL TEXT

http://journals.lww.com/co-hivandaids/Fulltext/2016/07000/Strategies_to_target_HIV_1_in_the_central_nervous.4.aspx

PDF (CLIC in PDF)

July 29, 2016 at 7:15 pm

2016-07-14 Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents

Key Updates

What to Start: Initial Combination Regimens for the Antiretroviral-Naive Patient

The approval of 3 fixed-dose combination products containing tenofovir alafenamide (an oral prodrug of tenofovir) and emtricitabine (TAF/FTC) prompted several changes in the What to Start section. The key changes are highlighted below:

– TAF/FTC was added as a 2-NRTI option in several Recommended and Alternative regimens, as noted in Table 6 of the guidelines. The addition of TAF/FTC to these recommendations is based on data from comparative trials demonstrating that TAF-containing regimens are as effective in achieving or maintaining virologic suppression as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing regimens and with more favorable effects on markers of bone and renal health.

– In the What to Start section, the evidence quality rating “II” was expanded to include “relative bioavailability/bioequivalence studies or regimen comparisons from randomized switch studies.” This evidence rating was broadened because not all recommended regimens were evaluated in randomized, controlled trials in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients. The Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (the Panel) based their recommendations for some regimens on either data from bioequivalence or relative bioavailability studies, or by extrapolating results from randomized “switch” studies that evaluated a drug’s or regimen’s ability to maintain virologic suppression in patients whose HIV was suppressed on a previous regimen. Guidance for clinicians on choosing between abacavir (ABC)-, TAF-, and TDF-containing regimens was added to What to Start.

– The lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus 2-NRTI regimen was removed from the list of Other regimens because regimens containing this protease inhibitor (PI) combination have a larger pill burden and greater toxicity than other currently available options.

Regimen Switching

– Based on the most current data, this section was simplified to focus on switch strategies for virologically suppressed patients. The strategies are categorized as Strategies with Good Supporting Evidence, Strategies Under Evaluation, and Strategies Not Recommended.

HIV-Infected Women

– The Panel emphasizes that ART is recommended for all HIV-infected patients, including all HIV-infected women.

– The Panel also stresses the importance of early treatment for HIV-infected women during pregnancy and continuation of ART after pregnancy.

– This section was updated to include new data on interactions between antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and hormonal contraceptives.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include TAF/FTC as a treatment option for patients with HBV/HIV coinfection. Data on the virologic efficacy of TAF for the treatment of HBV in persons without HIV infection and TAF/FTC in persons with HBV/HIV coinfection are discussed.

– The Panel no longer recommends adefovir or telbivudine as options for HBV/HIV coinfected patients, as there is limited safety and efficacy data on their use in this population. In addition, these agents have a higher incidence of toxicities than other recommended treatments.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV Coinfection

– The text and Table 12 in this section were updated with information regarding the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between different ARV drugs and the recently approved hepatitis C drugs daclatasvir and the fixed-dose combination product of elbasvir and grazoprevir.

– Peginterferon alfa and ribavirin were removed from Table 12, as these agents do not have significant PK interactions with ARV drugs.

Tuberculosis (TB)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include a discussion on the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in HIV-infected persons. The added discussion notes that a 12-week course of once-weekly rifapentine and isoniazid is an option for patients receiving either an efavirenz (EFV)- or a raltegravir (RAL)-based regimen.

– This section addresses the data from the TEMPRANO and START studies demonstrating a potential role of ART in reducing TB disease.

The recommendations and discussion regarding when to initiate ART in patients with active TB were simplified.

– As rifamycins are potent inducers of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and TAF is a P-gp substrate, coadministration of TAF and rifamycins is not recommended.

Additional Updates

Minor revisions were made to the following sections:

– Laboratory Testing for Initial Assessment and Monitoring of HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

– Drug Resistance Testing

– Adverse Effects of Antiretroviral Agents and Tables 14 and 15

– Monthly Average Wholesale Price of Commonly Used Antiretroviral Drugs (Table 16)

– Drug Interaction Tables 18, 19a-e, and 20b

– Drug Characteristics Tables (Appendix B, Tables 1–7)

PDF

https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adultandadolescentgl.pdf

 

July 25, 2016 at 2:17 pm

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