Posts filed under ‘HIV/SIDA Trastornos Piel y Tej Blandos’

Cutaneous manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus – A clinical update.

Curr Infect Dis Rep. 2015 Mar;17(3):464.

Altman K1, Vanness E, Westergaard RP.

Author information

1Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.

Abstract

Dermatologic diseases are common in the HIV-infected population. Many of the cutaneous diseases are not unique to this group, but the presentation can be more severe.

Although the introduction of antiretroviral therapy has been followed by a decline in many of the skin diseases associated with HIV, drug reactions and other non-infectious skin conditions have increased.

This article reviews the current spectrum of HIV-associated skin conditions, focusing on common complaints, infections, drug-associated toxicity and malignancies.

PDF

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4447481/pdf/nihms691071.pdf

Advertisements

September 27, 2015 at 4:33 pm

Dermatologic manifestations associated with HIV/AIDS.

Rev Chilena Infectol. 2015 Feb;32 Suppl 1:S57-71.

[Article in Spanish]

Navarrete-Dechent C, Ortega R, Fich F, Concha M.

Abstract

The ongoing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection epidemic coupled with more efficacious and available treatments has led to a larger number of patients living with HIV or AIDS.

As a result, skin manifestations related to HIV/AIDS or its therapy have become increasingly more common and are reported to occur in as many as 95% of patients.

Herein, we review the most common HIV/AIDS related cutaneous pathologies and classify them into inflammatory, HAART-associated, neoplastic, and infectious manifestations.

Cutaneous manifestations should be promptly recognized and treated by physicians and health care personnel in order to provide optimal care.

PDF

http://www.scielo.cl/pdf/rci/v32s1/art05.pdf

September 27, 2015 at 4:32 pm

Cutaneous manifestations of HIV.

Gac Med Mex. 2014 Dec;150 Suppl 2:194-221.

Article in Spanish

Garza-Garza R1, González-González SE1, Ocampo-Candiani J1.

Author information

1Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario «Dr. José Eleuterio González», Monterrey, N.L.

Abstract

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a lentivirus member of the Retroviridae family, the clinical spectrum of which includes: primary infection, clinically asymptomatic stage, early symptomatic infection, and advanced immunodeficiency.

The latter can present with complications associated to opportunistic infections, malignancies, and/or neurological diseases. The cutaneous manifestations of HIV are extremely common and include those related with early HIV infection and other infectious diseases (bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic) and noninfectious etiologies.

These manifestations may be the first signs of immunosuppression and can lead to the HIV diagnosis. The higher frequency of skin diseases occurs when the CD4 count is less than 250 cells/mm3.

The knowledge of these defining cutaneous conditions in patients infected with HIV is essential for an early diagnosis of infection, for establishing an early antiretroviral treatment, and improving the prognosis of these patients.

PDF

http://www.anmm.org.mx/GMM/2014/s2/GMM_150_2014_S2_194-221.pdf

September 27, 2015 at 4:30 pm

GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan: Consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2014).

Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2014 Aug-Sep;32(7):446.e1-42.

Article in Spanish

Panel de expertos de GeSIDA; Plan Nacional sobre el Sida.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines for HIV-1 infected adult patients.

METHODS:

To formulate these recommendations a panel composed of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendations strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

RESULTS:

In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with the clinical circumstances: CDC stage B or C disease (A-I), asymptomatic patients (depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count: <350cells/μL, A-I; 350-500 cells/μL, A-II, and >500 cells/μL, B-III), comorbid conditions (HIV nephropathy, chronic hepatitis caused by HBV or HCV, age >55years, high cardiovascular risk, neurocognitive disorders, and cancer, A-II), and prevention of transmission of HIV (mother-to-child or heterosexual, A-I; men who have sex with men, A-III). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). Some of the possible initial regimens have been considered alternatives. This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure where rescue ART should comprise 2 or 3 drugs that are fully active against the virus. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer).

CONCLUSIONS:

These new guidelines updates previous recommendations related to cART (when to begin and what drugs should be used), how to monitor and what to do in case of viral failure or drug adverse reactions. cART specific criteria in comorbid patients and special situations are equally updated.

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90340091&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=107&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=es&fichero=28v32n07a90340091pdf001.pdf

June 13, 2015 at 10:40 am

CONSENSO GeSIDA TARV en adultos

2015-01 CONSENSO GeSIDA TARV en adultos EIMC 101 págs.

PDF

http://www.seimc.org/contenidos/gruposdeestudio/gesida/dcientificos/documentos/2015/gesida-guiasclinicas-2015-tar.pdf

 

March 6, 2015 at 8:56 am

Documento de consenso de GeSIDA/Plan Nacional sobre el Sida respecto al tratamiento antirretroviral en adultos infectados por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (Actualización enero 2014)

Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica Agosto-Septiembre 2014 V.32 N.7

2014 – CONSENSO GeSIDA – TARV en adultos -Update

Documento de consenso de GeSIDA/Plan Nacional sobre el Sida respecto al tratamiento antirretroviral en adultos infectados por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (Actualización enero 2014)

Panel de expertos de GeSIDA y Plan Nacional sobre el Sida

Objetivo

Actualizar las recomendaciones sobre el tratamiento antirretroviral (TAR) para adultos infectados por el VIH-1.

Métodos

Este documento ha sido consensuado por un panel de expertos de GESIDA y de la Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida tras revisar los resultados de eficacia y seguridad de ensayos clínicos, estudios de cohortes y de farmacocinética publicados en revistas biomédicas (PubMed y Embase) o presentados en congresos. La fuerza de cada recomendación y la gradación de su evidencia se basan en una modificación de los criterios de la Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Resultados

Se recomienda el TAR en todos los pacientes infectados por el VIH-1. La fuerza y la gradación de la recomendación varían según la circunstancia clínica: enfermedades B o C de los CDC (A-I), pacientes asintomáticos según número de CD4+ (< 350, A-I; 350-500, A-II; > 500, B-III), comorbilidades (nefropatía por VIH, hepatitis crónica por VHB o VHC, edad superior a 55 años, riesgo cardiovascular elevado, trastornos neurocognitivos o neoplasias, A-II) y prevención de la transmisión del VIH (materno-fetal o heterosexual, A-I; homosexual entre hombres, A-III). El objetivo del TAR es lograr una carga viral plasmática (CVP) indetectable. El TAR de inicio debe ser siempre una combinación de 3 fármacos que incluya una asociación de 2 ITIAN y otro fármaco de distinta familia (ITINN, IP/r o InInt). De las posibles pautas de inicio se han considerado algunas como alternativa. Se exponen las causas y los criterios para cambiar un TAR estando con CVP indetectable, así como en el fracaso virológico en el que en el TAR de rescate se deben usar 3 o 2 fármacos plenamente activos frente al virus. Se actualizan igualmente los criterios específicos del TAR en situaciones especiales (infección aguda, infección por VIH-2, embarazo) o comorbilidades (tuberculosis u otra enfermedad oportunista, afectación renal, hepatopatías y neoplasias).

Conclusiones

Este nuevo documento actualiza las recomendaciones previas respecto a cuándo y con qué regímenes iniciar el TAR, cómo monitorizarlo y qué hacer cuando fracasa o desarrolla toxicidad. Se actualizan los criterios específicos del TAR en pacientes con comorbilidades y en situaciones especiales.

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90340091&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=107&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=zl.elsevier.es&lan=es&fichero=28v32n07a90340091pdf001.pdf

 

August 30, 2014 at 8:35 pm

Guidelines for the Use of ARV Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents DHHS MAY, 2014

Developed by the HHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents – A Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council (OARAC)

PDF

http://www.aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adultandadolescentgl.pdf

August 30, 2014 at 8:32 pm

Older Posts Newer Posts


Calendar

July 2019
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category