Posts filed under ‘HIV/SIDA Trastornos respiratorias’

Impact of Cigarette Smoking and Smoking Cessation on Life Expectancy Among People With HIV: A US-Based Modeling Study

Journal of Infectious Diseases December 1, 2016 V.214 N.11 P.1672-1681

Krishna P. Reddy, Robert A. Parker, Elena Losina, Travis P. Baggett, A. David Paltiel, Nancy A. Rigotti, Milton C. Weinstein, Kenneth A. Freedberg, and Rochelle P. Walensky

1Medical Practice Evaluation Center

2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

3Division of General Internal Medicine

4Biostatistics Center

5Tobacco Research and Treatment Center

6Mongan Institute for Health Policy

7Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital

8Harvard Medical School

9Department of Orthopedic Surgery

10Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

11Department of Biostatistics

12Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health

13Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program

14Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts

15Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut

Background

In the United States, >40% of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) smoke cigarettes.

Methods

We used a computer simulation of HIV disease and treatment to project the life expectancy of HIV-infected persons, based on smoking status. We used age- and sex-specific data on mortality, stratified by smoking status. The ratio of the non-AIDS-related mortality risk for current smokers versus that for never smokers was 2.8, and the ratio for former smokers versus never smokers was 1.0–1.8, depending on cessation age. Projected survival was based on smoking status, sex, and initial age. We also estimated the total potential life-years gained if a proportion of the approximately 248 000 HIV-infected US smokers quit smoking.

Results

Men and women entering HIV care at age 40 years (mean CD4+ T-cell count, 360 cells/µL) who continued to smoke lost 6.7 years and 6.3 years of life expectancy, respectively, compared with never smokers; those who quit smoking upon entering care regained 5.7 years and 4.6 years, respectively. Factors associated with greater benefits from smoking cessation included younger age, higher initial CD4+ T-cell count, and complete adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Smoking cessation by 10%–25% of HIV-infected smokers could save approximately 106 000–265 000 years of life.

Conclusions

HIV-infected US smokers aged 40 years lose >6 years of life expectancy from smoking, possibly outweighing the loss from HIV infection itself. Smoking cessation should become a priority in HIV treatment programs.

PDF

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/214/11/1672.full.pdf+html

December 11, 2016 at 8:29 pm

Editorial – The Shifting Paradigm of Care for Adults Living With HIV – Smoking Cessation for Longer Life

Journal of Infectious Diseases December 1, 2016 V.214 N.11 P.1618-1620

Keri N. Althoff

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland

There are few truths in medical science that are as agreed upon as this: smoking is bad for health. In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, smoking is a scourge, with recent prevalence estimates of 42%, which Reddy et al, in this issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, translated to an estimated 247 586 smokers among those in HIV care in the United States [1, 2]. It is hypothesized that adults living with HIV start smoking at younger ages, smoke more heavily and for a longer duration, and have lower rates of cessation than the general population in the United States. However, population-based estimates are not available. The problem may seem insurmountable, particularly because a delay in the manifestations of harm from smoking creates a lack of urgency for cessation. Because the HIV infection paradigm has changed from an acutely terminal illness to a chronic infection with a life expectancy approaching that of uninfected adults, the paradigm of how we protect the health of people living with HIV has also evolved.

Reddy et al estimate a gain in life expectancy of 5.7 years among men and 4.6 years among women who quit smoking upon entering into HIV care [2]. The authors predict that if a quarter of HIV-infected adults quit smoking, 265 000 years of life could be regained at the population level. It is reasonable to assume that there is also an increased quality of life, not only quantity of life, given the strong associations of smoking with a poorer immunologic response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the development of cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lower respiratory tract infections [3]. After accounting for nonadherence to …

PDF

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/214/11/1618.full.pdf+html

December 11, 2016 at 8:28 pm

2016 BHIVA GUIDELINES for the treatment of HIV-1-positive Adults with antiretroviral therapy

The British HIV Association

Writing Group

Laura Waters (Chair)

N Ahmed, B Angus, M Boffito, M Bower, D Churchill, D Dunn, S Edwards, C Emerson, S Fidler, †M Fisher, R Horne, S Khoo, C Leen, N Mackie, N Marshall, F Monteiro, M Nelson, C Orkin, A Palfreeman, S Pett, A Phillips, F Post, A Pozniak, I Reeves, C Sabin, R Trevelion, J Walsh, E Wilkins, I Williams, A Winston

†Professor Martin Fisher died in April 2015 – he made a significant contribution to these, many other guidelines and our speciality as a whole – he is greatly missed.

Introduction

The overall purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on best clinical practice in the treatment and management of adults with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy (ART).

The scope includes: (i) guidance on the initiation of ART in those previously naïve to therapy; (ii) support of people living with HIV (PLWH) on treatment; (iii) management of individuals experiencing virological failure; and (iv) recommendations in specific populations where other factors need to be taken into consideration.

The guidelines are aimed at clinical professionals directly involved with and responsible for the care of adults with HIV infection, and at community advocates responsible for promoting the best interests and care of HIV-positive adults. They should be read in conjunction with other published BHIVA guidelines.

The 2016 interim update to the 2015 BHIVA antiretroviral guidelines has been published online to include tenofovir-alafenamide/emtricitabine as a preferred NRTI backbone for first-line therapy. Changes were based on new data and the consensus opinion of the writing committee. All changes to the guideline are highlighted and include updates to the chronic kidney disease and bone disease sections of special populations and some small changes to managing virological failure. The next formal update to the guidelines in anticipated in 2017.

PDF

http://www.bhiva.org/documents/Guidelines/Treatment/2016/treatment-guidelines-2016-interim-update.pdf

December 3, 2016 at 9:33 am

2016-07-14 Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents

Key Updates

What to Start: Initial Combination Regimens for the Antiretroviral-Naive Patient

The approval of 3 fixed-dose combination products containing tenofovir alafenamide (an oral prodrug of tenofovir) and emtricitabine (TAF/FTC) prompted several changes in the What to Start section. The key changes are highlighted below:

– TAF/FTC was added as a 2-NRTI option in several Recommended and Alternative regimens, as noted in Table 6 of the guidelines. The addition of TAF/FTC to these recommendations is based on data from comparative trials demonstrating that TAF-containing regimens are as effective in achieving or maintaining virologic suppression as tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing regimens and with more favorable effects on markers of bone and renal health.

– In the What to Start section, the evidence quality rating “II” was expanded to include “relative bioavailability/bioequivalence studies or regimen comparisons from randomized switch studies.” This evidence rating was broadened because not all recommended regimens were evaluated in randomized, controlled trials in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients. The Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (the Panel) based their recommendations for some regimens on either data from bioequivalence or relative bioavailability studies, or by extrapolating results from randomized “switch” studies that evaluated a drug’s or regimen’s ability to maintain virologic suppression in patients whose HIV was suppressed on a previous regimen. Guidance for clinicians on choosing between abacavir (ABC)-, TAF-, and TDF-containing regimens was added to What to Start.

– The lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus 2-NRTI regimen was removed from the list of Other regimens because regimens containing this protease inhibitor (PI) combination have a larger pill burden and greater toxicity than other currently available options.

Regimen Switching

– Based on the most current data, this section was simplified to focus on switch strategies for virologically suppressed patients. The strategies are categorized as Strategies with Good Supporting Evidence, Strategies Under Evaluation, and Strategies Not Recommended.

HIV-Infected Women

– The Panel emphasizes that ART is recommended for all HIV-infected patients, including all HIV-infected women.

– The Panel also stresses the importance of early treatment for HIV-infected women during pregnancy and continuation of ART after pregnancy.

– This section was updated to include new data on interactions between antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and hormonal contraceptives.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include TAF/FTC as a treatment option for patients with HBV/HIV coinfection. Data on the virologic efficacy of TAF for the treatment of HBV in persons without HIV infection and TAF/FTC in persons with HBV/HIV coinfection are discussed.

– The Panel no longer recommends adefovir or telbivudine as options for HBV/HIV coinfected patients, as there is limited safety and efficacy data on their use in this population. In addition, these agents have a higher incidence of toxicities than other recommended treatments.

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV Coinfection

– The text and Table 12 in this section were updated with information regarding the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between different ARV drugs and the recently approved hepatitis C drugs daclatasvir and the fixed-dose combination product of elbasvir and grazoprevir.

– Peginterferon alfa and ribavirin were removed from Table 12, as these agents do not have significant PK interactions with ARV drugs.

Tuberculosis (TB)/HIV Coinfection

– This section was updated to include a discussion on the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in HIV-infected persons. The added discussion notes that a 12-week course of once-weekly rifapentine and isoniazid is an option for patients receiving either an efavirenz (EFV)- or a raltegravir (RAL)-based regimen.

– This section addresses the data from the TEMPRANO and START studies demonstrating a potential role of ART in reducing TB disease.

The recommendations and discussion regarding when to initiate ART in patients with active TB were simplified.

– As rifamycins are potent inducers of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and TAF is a P-gp substrate, coadministration of TAF and rifamycins is not recommended.

Additional Updates

Minor revisions were made to the following sections:

– Laboratory Testing for Initial Assessment and Monitoring of HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

– Drug Resistance Testing

– Adverse Effects of Antiretroviral Agents and Tables 14 and 15

– Monthly Average Wholesale Price of Commonly Used Antiretroviral Drugs (Table 16)

– Drug Interaction Tables 18, 19a-e, and 20b

– Drug Characteristics Tables (Appendix B, Tables 1–7)

PDF

https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adultandadolescentgl.pdf

 

July 25, 2016 at 2:17 pm

Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults: 2016 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society–USA Panel

JAMA July 12, 2016 V.316 N.2 P.191-210

Special Communication

Huldrych F. Günthard, MD; Michael S. Saag, MD; Constance A. Benson, MD; Carlos del Rio, MD; Joseph J. Eron, MD; Joel E. Gallant, MD, MPH; Jennifer F. Hoy, MBBS, FRACP; Michael J. Mugavero, MD, MHSc; Paul E. Sax, MD; Melanie A. Thompson, MD; Rajesh T. Gandhi, MD; Raphael J. Landovitz, MD; Davey M. Smith, MD; Donna M. Jacobsen, BS; Paul A. Volberding, MD

1University Hospital Zurich and Institute of Medical Virology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

2University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham

3University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego

4Emory University Rollins School of Public Health and School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

5University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill

6Southwest CARE Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico

7Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

8Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

9AIDS Research Consortium of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia

10Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston

11University of California Los Angeles

12University of California San Diego, La Jolla

13International Antiviral Society–USA, San Francisco, California

14University of California San Francisco

Importance 

New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults.

Objective 

To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis.

Evidence

Review  A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society–USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence.

Findings 

Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory assessments are recommended before treatment, and monitoring during treatment is recommended to assess response, adverse effects, and adherence. Approaches are recommended to improve linkage to and retention in care are provided. Daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is recommended for use as preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection in persons at high risk. When indicated, postexposure prophylaxis should be started as soon as possible after exposure.

Conclusions and Relevance 

Antiretroviral agents remain the cornerstone of HIV treatment and prevention. All HIV-infected individuals with detectable plasma virus should receive treatment with recommended initial regimens consisting of an InSTI plus 2 NRTIs. Preexposure prophylaxis should be considered as part of an HIV prevention strategy for at-risk individuals. When used effectively, currently available ARVs can sustain HIV suppression and can prevent new HIV infection. With these treatment regimens, survival rates among HIV-infected adults who are retained in care can approach those of uninfected adults.

FULL TEXT

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2533073

July 17, 2016 at 4:30 pm

Treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia with intermediate-dose and step-down to low-dose trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole: Lessons from an observational cohort study.

Infection 2015 Oct 15

Dina Creemers-Schild, Frank P. Kroon, Ed. J. Kuijper, Mark G. J. de Boer

Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands

Department of Medical Microbiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands

Background

The recommended treatment of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is high-dose trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP–SMX) in an equivalent of TMP 15–20 mg/kg/day and SMX 75–100 mg/kg/day for 2 or 3 weeks. High rates of adverse events are reported with this dose, which raises the question if lower doses are possible.

Methods

All adult patients diagnosed with PCP in various immune dysfunctions and treated with TMP–SMX between January 1, 2003 and July 1, 2013 in a tertiary university hospital were included. Per institutional protocol, patients initiated treatment on intermediate-dose TMP–SMX (TMP 10–15 mg/kg/day) and could be stepped down to low-dose TMP–SMX (TMP 4–6 mg/kg/day) during treatment. Clinical variables at presentation, relapse rate and mortality rates were compared between intermediate- and step-down treatment groups by uni- and multivariate analyses.

Results

A total of 104 patients were included. Twenty-four patients (23 %) were switched to low-dose TMP–SMX after a median of 4.5 days (IQR 2.8–7.0 days). One relapse (4 %) occurred in the step-down group versus none in the intermediate-dose group. The overall 30-day mortality was 13 %. There was 1 death in the step-down group (4 %) compared to 13 deaths (16 %) in the intermediate-dose group.

Conclusions

We observed high cure rates of PCP by treatment with intermediate-dose TMP–SMX. In addition, a step-down strategy to low-dose TMP–SMX during treatment in selected patients appears to be safe and does not compromise the outcome of treatment.

abstract

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs15010-015-0851-1

PDF

http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/174/art%253A10.1007%252Fs15010-015-0851-1.pdf?originUrl=http%3A%2F%2Flink.springer.com%2Farticle%2F10.1007%2Fs15010-015-0851-1&token2=exp=1450784605~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F174%2Fart%25253A10.1007%25252Fs15010-015-0851-1.pdf%3ForiginUrl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Flink.springer.com%252Farticle%252F10.1007%252Fs15010-015-0851-1*~hmac=631be9d6e6d51a6cab7261bbad2f902231fc812d7b9685ea6777ac3747563a2c

December 22, 2015 at 8:31 am

Increased Risk for Group B Streptococcus Sepsis in Young Infants Exposed to HIV, Soweto, South Africa, 2004–2008

Emerging Infectious Diseases MAY 2015 V.21 N.4

Research

Clare L. Cutland, Stephanie J. Schrag, Michael C. Thigpen, Sithembiso C. Velaphi, Jeannette Wadula, Peter V. Adrian, Locadiah Kuwanda, Michelle J. Groome, Eckhart Buchmann, and Shabir A. Madhi

University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa (C.L. Cutland, S.C. Velaphi, J. Wadula, P.V. Adrian, L. Kuwanda, M.J. Groome, E. Buchmann, S.A. Madhi); Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (C.L. Cutland, P.V. Adrian, L. Kuwanda, M.J. Groome, S.A. Madhi); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (S.J. Schrag, M.C. Thigpen); Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Johannesburg (S.C. Velaphi, J. Wadula, E. Buchmann); National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Sandringham, South Africa (S.A. Madhi)

Although group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of severe invasive disease in young infants worldwide, epidemiologic data and knowledge about risk factors for the disease are lacking from low- to middle-income countries.

To determine the epidemiology of invasive GBS disease among young infants in a setting with high maternal HIV infection, we conducted hospital-based surveillance during 2004–2008 in Soweto, South Africa.

Overall GBS incidence was 2.72 cases/1,000 live births (1.50 and 1.22, respectively, among infants with early-onset disease [EOD] and late-onset [LOD] disease). Risk for EOD and LOD was higher for HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants.

GBS serotypes Ia and III accounted for 84.0% of cases, and 16.9% of infected infants died. We estimate that use of trivalent GBS vaccine (serotypes Ia, Ib, and III) could prevent 2,105 invasive GBS cases and 278 deaths annually among infants in South Africa; therefore, vaccination of all pregnant women in this country should be explored.

PDF

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/21/4/pdfs/14-1562.pdf

August 29, 2015 at 11:03 am

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