Posts filed under ‘Infecciones cardio-vasculares’

A Review of Combination Antimicrobial Therapy for Enterococcus faecalis Bloodstream Infections and Infective Endocarditis

Clinical Infectious Diseases July 15, 2018 V.67 N.2 P.303-309

EDITOR’S CHOICE

Maya Beganovic; Megan K Luther; Louis B Rice; Cesar A Arias; Michael J Rybak …

Esta revisión destaca las opciones de tratamiento disponibles y sus limitaciones, y proporciona orientación para futuros esfuerzos de investigación para ayudar en el tratamiento de infecciones graves de Enterococcus faecalis, a saber, endocarditis infecciosa.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/67/2/303/4829420

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

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July 15, 2018 at 5:04 pm

July 2018 Comparative Sensitivity of Transthoracic and Transesophageal Echocardiography in Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis Among Veterans With Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

Background

Echocardiography is fundamental for diagnosing infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), but whether all such patients require transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is controversial.

Methods.

We identified SAB cases between February 2008 and April 2012. We compared sensitivity and specificity of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and TEE for evidence of IE, and we determined impacts of IE risk factors and TTE image quality on comparative sensitivities of TTE and TEE and their impact on clinical decision making.

Results.

Of 215 evaluable SAB cases, 193 (90%) had TTE and 130 (60%) had TEE. In 119 cases with both tests, IE was diagnosed in 29 (24%), for whom endocardial involvement was evident in 25 (86%) by TEE, vs only 6 (21%) by TTE (P < .001). Transesophageal echocardiography was more sensitive than TTE regardless of risk factors. Even among the 66 cases with adequate or better quality TTE images, sensitivity was only 4 of 17 (24%) for TTE, vs 16 of  17 (94%) for TEE (P < .001). Among 130 patients with TEE, the TEE results, alone or with TTE results, influenced treatment duration in 56 (43%) cases and led to valve surgery in at least 4 (6%). It is notable that, despite vigorous efforts to obtain both tests routinely, TEE was not done in 86 cases (40%) for various reasons, including pathophysiological contraindications (14%), patient refusal or other patient-related factors (16%), and provider declination or system issues (10%).

Conclusions.

Patients with SAB should undergo TEE when possible to detect evidence for IE, especially if the results might affect management.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/ofid/article/4/2/ofx035/3044172

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

July 15, 2018 at 3:52 pm

Bloodstream infections in cancer patients. Risk factors associated with mortality

International Journal of Infectious Diseases June 2018 V.71 P.59-64

Beda Islas-Muñoz, Patricia Volkow-Fernández, Cynthia Ibanes-Gutiérrez, Alberto Villamar-Ramírez, Diana Vilar-Compte, Patricia Cornejo-Juárez

Highlights

  • Bloodstream infections (BSI) cause severe complications in cancer patients.
  • Secondary BSI and central-related BSI were the most common in solid tumors.
  • Primary BSI and mucosal barrier injury BSI were described in hematological patients.
  • Mortality at 30-days was increased with multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.
  • Inappropriate antimicrobial treatment in the first 24 h was related with mortality.

Objective

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality in cancer patients with bloodstream infections (BSI), analyzing multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR).

Methods

We conducted a prospective observational study at a cancer referral center from August 2016 to July 2017, which included all BSI.

Results

4220 patients were tested with blood cultures; 496 were included. Mean age was 48 years. In 299 patients with solid tumors, secondary BSI and Central Line-Associated BSI (CLABSI) were the most common (55.9% and 31.8%, respectively). In 197 hematologic patients, primary and mucosal barrier injury (MBI) BSI were the main type (38.6%). Gram-negative were the most frequent bacteria (72.8%), with Escherichia coli occupying the first place (n = 210, 42.3%), 48% were Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) producers, and 1.8% were resistant to carbapenems. Mortality at day 30, was 22%, but reached 70% when patients did not receive an appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Multivariate analysis showed that progression or relapse of the oncologic disease, inappropriate antimicrobial treatment, and having resistant bacteria were independently associated with 30-day mortality.

Conclusions

Emergence of MDR bacteria is an important healthcare problem worldwide. Patients with BSI, particularly those patients with MDR bacteria have a higher mortality risk.

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(18)30081-X/pdf

July 14, 2018 at 7:25 pm

Outcomes of infective endocarditis in the current era: Early predictors of a poor prognosis

International Journal of Infectious Diseases March 2018 V.68 P.102-107

Maria Carmo Pereira Nunes, Milton Henriques Guimarães-Júnior, Pedro Henrique Oliveira Murta Pinto, Rodrigo Matos Pinto Coelho, Thais Lins Souza Barros, Nicole de Paula Aarão Faleiro Maia, Dayane Amaral Madureira, Rodrigo Citton Padilha Reis, Paulo Henrique Nogueira Costa, Renato Bráulio, Cláudio Léo Gelape, Teresa Cristina Abreu Ferrari

Background

The early identification of patients at risk of complications of infective endocarditis (IE) using parameters obtained as part of routine practice is essential for guiding clinical decision-making. This study aimed to identify a parameter at hospital admission that predicts the outcome, adding value to other well-known factors of a poor prognosis in IE.

Methods

Two hundred and three patients with IE were included in this study. Clinical evaluation, echocardiography, blood cultures, and routine laboratory tests were performed at hospital admission. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality.

Results

The mean age of the patients was 48.2 ± 16.6 years; 62% were male and 38% had rheumatic heart disease. During treatment, cardiac surgery was performed in 111 patients (55%), and the overall in-hospital mortality rate was 32%. In the multivariable analysis, the independent predictors of death were age (odds ratio (OR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02–1.13), C-reactive protein (CRP) at hospital admission (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.04–1.21), length of the vegetation at diagnosis (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.03–1.28), development of heart failure (OR 6.43, 95% CI 2.14–19.33), and embolic events during antimicrobial therapy (OR 12.14, 95% CI 2.11–71.89).

Conclusions

An elevated CRP level at hospital admission and vegetation length at diagnosis were strong predictors of in-hospital mortality in IE, independent of other prognostic parameters, specifically taking into account patient characteristics and complications during therapy.

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(18)30017-1/pdf

July 14, 2018 at 7:09 pm

Criteria for Identifying Patients With Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Who Are at Low Risk of Endocarditis: A Systematic Review

Open Forum Infectious Diseases Fall 2017 V.4 N.4

George S Heriot; Katie Cronin; Steven Y C Tong; Allen C Cheng; Danny Liew

Esta revisión sistemática examina los métodos y resultados de estudios recientes que informan criterios clínicos capaces de identificar a pacientes con bacteriemia por Staph aureus que tienen un riesgo muy bajo de endocarditis (EI).

Se realizaron búsquedas en PubMed, EMBASE y la base de datos CENTRAL de la Colaboración Cochrane para artículos publicados después de marzo de 1994 utilizando una combinación de MeSH y términos de búsqueda de texto libre para S. aureus y bacteriemia y EI.

Los estudios se incluyeron si presentaban una combinación de criterios clínicos y microbiológicos con una razón de verosimilitud negativa de ≤ 0,20 para EI.

Encontramos 8 estudios que empleaban diversos criterios y estándares de referencia cuyos criterios se asociaron con razones de probabilidad negativas entre 0.00 y 0.19 (que corresponden al 0% -5% de riesgo de EI con una prevalencia de fondo del 20%).

El beneficio de la ecocardiografía para los pacientes que cumplen estos criterios es incierto.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/ofid/article/4/4/ofx261/4657117

PDF  (CLIC en PDF)

 

 

April 1, 2018 at 3:13 pm

Early-onset prosthetic valve endocarditis definition revisited: Prospective study and literature review

International Journal of Infectious Diseases February 2018 V.67 P.3–6

Rinaldo Focaccia Siciliano, Bruno Azevedo Randi, Danielle Menosi Gualandro, Roney Orismar Sampaio, Márcio Sommer Bittencourt, Christian Emmanuel da Silva Pelaes, Alfredo José Mansur, Pablo Maria Alberto Pomerantzeff, Flávio Tarasoutchi, Tânia Mara Varejão Strabelli

Highlights

  • Studies reporting the etiology of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) are an unmet clinical need.
  • A prospective cohort study was performed along with a literature review to describe the distribution of the etiology of PVE.
  • At >120 days after valve surgery, there is a decrease in the incidence of resistant microorganisms.
  • PVE occurring at >120 days after surgery may be treated with the same empirical treatment as for late PVE.
  • This approach could lead to higher antibiotic efficacy and less damage to the patient’s natural flora.

Objective

To determine the annual incidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) and to evaluate its current classification based on the epidemiological distribution of agents identified and their sensitivity profiles.

Methods

Consecutive cases of PVE occurring within the first year of valve surgery during the period 1997–2014 were included in this prospective cohort study. Incidence, demographic, clinical, microbiological, and in-hospital mortality data of these PVE patients were recorded.

Results

One hundred and seventy-two cases of PVE were included, and the global annual incidence of PVE was 1.7%. Most PVE cases occurred within 120 days after surgery (76.7%). After this period, there was a reduction in resistant microorganisms (64.4% vs. 32.3%, respectively; p = 0.007) and an increase in the incidence of Streptococcus spp (1.9% vs. 23.5%; p = 0.007). A literature review revealed 646 cases of PVE with an identified etiology, of which 264 (41%) were caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci and 43 (7%) by Streptococcus spp. This is in agreement with the current study findings.

Conclusions

Most PVE cases occurred within 120 days after valve surgery, and the same etiological agents were identified in this period. The current cut-off level of 365 days for the classification of early-onset PVE should be revisited.

abstract

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30228-X/fulltext

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30228-X/pdf

February 18, 2018 at 4:03 pm

Emerging group C and group G streptococcal endocarditis: A Canadian perspective

International Journal of Infectious Diseases December 2017 V.65 N. P.128–132

Sylvain A. Lother, Davinder S. Jassal, Philippe Lagacé-Wiens, Yoav Keynan

Objectives

The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with bacteremia caused by group C and group G streptococci (GCGS) and to characterize the burden of disease, clinical characteristics, and outcomes through a case series of patients with GCGS IE.

Methods

Individuals with blood cultures growing GCGS in Manitoba, Canada, between January 2012 and December 2015 were included. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were collected retrospectively. IE was suspected or confirmed according to the modified Duke criteria.

Results

Two hundred and nine bacteremic events occurred in 198 patients. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed in 33%. Suspected or confirmed IE occurred in 6% of all patients and in 18% of those with TTE. Native valve infection was more common than prosthetic valve and device-related infections (75%, 17%, and 8%, respectively). Metastatic infection was observed in 64%, primarily to the lungs (57%), skin (43%), osteoarticular system (29%), and central nervous system (29%). Sepsis occurred in 58% and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in 50% of those with IE, with overall mortality of 17%.

Conclusions

IE from GCGS bacteremia is common and is frequently associated with severe disease, embolic events, and mortality. In the appropriate clinical context, GCGS bacteremic events should prompt investigation for IE.

abstract

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30274-6/fulltext

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30274-6/pdf

February 9, 2018 at 1:25 pm

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