Posts filed under ‘Infecciones de transmision sexual’

Zika Virus

N Engl J Med April 21, 2016 V.374 P.1552-1563

REVIEW ARTICLE

L.R. Petersen, D.J. Jamieson, A.M. Powers, and M.A. Honein

From the Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO (L.R.P., A.M.P.); and the Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (D.J.J), and the Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (M.A.H), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta.

In 1947, a study of yellow fever yielded the first isolation of a new virus, from the blood of a sentinel rhesus macaque that had been placed in the Zika Forest of Uganda.1 Zika virus remained in relative obscurity for nearly 70 years; then, within the span of just 1 year, Zika virus was introduced into Brazil from the Pacific Islands and spread rapidly throughout the Americas.2 It became the first major infectious disease linked to human birth defects to be discovered in more than half a century and created such global alarm that the World Health Organization (WHO) would declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.3 This review describes the current understanding of the epidemiology, transmission, clinical characteristics, and diagnosis of Zika virus infection, as well as the future outlook with regard to this disease…

PDF

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMra1602113

April 21, 2016 at 3:24 pm

Technological Solutions to Address Drug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Emerging Infectious Diseases May 2016 V.22 N.5

Letter

To the Editor: Since the 1930s, Neisseria gonorrhoeae has become resistant to drugs in every class of antimicrobial therapy used to treat it. We read with interest the article by Martin et al. about trends in Canada on N. gonorrhoeae susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins, the only class of antimicrobial drugs to which most N. gonorrhoeae strains remain susceptible (1). We find the reported decrease in cefixime- and ceftriaxone-reduced susceptibility during 2010–2014 encouraging, but remain concerned about a threat from drug-resistant and untreatable N. gonorrhoeae infections: a similar downward trend in the United States reversed in 2014 (2). That divergence demonstrates the limited reliability of surveillance data…..

PDF

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/22/5/pdfs/16-0083.pdf

April 17, 2016 at 11:09 am

Male-to-Male Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus — Texas, January 2016

MMWR Weekly April 15, 2016 V.65 N.14 P.372–4

Trew Deckard, PA-C; Wendy M. Chung, MD; John T. Brooks, MD; et al

1Medical office of Steven M. Pounders, MD, Dallas, Texas; 2Acute Communicable Disease Epidemiology Division, Dallas County Health and Human Services, Texas; 3Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Hepatitis, TB and STD Prevention, CDC; 4Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC, Ft. Collins, Colorado; 5Epidemic Intelligence Service, CDC.

Zika virus infection has been linked to increased risk for Guillain-Barré syndrome and adverse fetal outcomes, including congenital microcephaly. In January 2016, after notification from a local health care provider, an investigation by Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) identified a case of sexual transmission of Zika virus between a man with recent travel to an area of active Zika virus transmission (patient A) and his nontraveling male partner (patient B). At this time, there had been one prior case report of sexual transmission of Zika virus (1). The present case report indicates Zika virus can be transmitted through anal sex, as well as vaginal sex. Identification and investigation of cases of sexual transmission of Zika virus in nonendemic areas present valuable opportunities to inform recommendations to prevent sexual transmission of Zika virus.

PDF

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/pdfs/mm6514a3.pdf

April 16, 2016 at 9:44 am

Zika Virus Infection with Prolonged Maternal Viremia and Fetal Brain Abnormalities

New England Journal of Medicine March 31, 2016

BRIEF REPORT

Rita W. Driggers, M.D., Cheng-Ying Ho, M.D., Ph.D., Essi M. Korhonen, M.Sc., Suvi Kuivanen, M.Sc., Anne J. Jääskeläinen, Ph.D., Teemu Smura, Ph.D., Avi Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., D. Ashley Hill, M.D., Roberta L. DeBiasi, M.D., Gilbert Vezina, M.D., Julia Timofeev, M.D., Fausto J. Rodriguez, M.D., Lev Levanov, Ph.D., Jennifer Razak, M.G.C., C.G.C, Preetha Iyengar, M.D., Andrew Hennenfent, D.V.M., M.P.H., Richard Kennedy, M.D., Robert Lanciotti, Ph.D., Adre du Plessis, M.B., Ch.B., M.P.H., and Olli Vapalahti, M.D., Ph.D.

The current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been associated with an apparent increased risk of congenital microcephaly. We describe a case of a pregnant woman and her fetus infected with ZIKV during the 11th gestational week.

The fetal head circumference decreased from the 47th percentile to the 24th percentile between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation. ZIKV RNA was identified in maternal serum at 16 and 21 weeks of gestation.

At 19 and 20 weeks of gestation, substantial brain abnormalities were detected on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the presence of microcephaly or intracranial calcifications. On postmortem analysis of the fetal brain, diffuse cerebral cortical thinning, high ZIKV RNA loads, and viral particles were detected, and ZIKV was subsequently isolated….

PDF

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa1601824

March 30, 2016 at 10:27 pm

Mejora del diagnóstico de las infecciones por Chamydia trachomatis en la era molecular, una oportunidad para los sistemas de vigilancia

Enf Infecc & Microbiol. Clínica Diciembre 2015 V.33 N.10 P.639-41

Editorial

Juan Carlos Galán, Mario Rodríguez-Domínguez

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90445472&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=152&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=es&fichero=28v33n10a90445472pdf001.pdf

 

 

Enf Infecc & Microbiol. Clínica Diciembre 2015 V.33 N.10 P.642-5

Comparación del kit CT OligoGen con el ensayo Cobas 4800 para la detección de Chlamydia trachomatis

Manuel Parra-Sánchez, Ana Marcuello-López, Silvia García-Rey, Ismail Zakariya-Yousef, Nieves Sivianes-Valdecantos, Celestina Sierra-Atienza, Samuel Bernal-Martínez, Isabel Pueyo-Rodrígez, Estrella Martín-Mazuelos, José Carlos Palomares-Folía

a Unit of Infectious Disease and Clinical Microbiology, Valme University Hospital, Seville, Spain

b Operon Inmuno & Molecular Diagnostics, Cuarte de Huerva, Zaragoza, Spain

c Center of Sexually Transmitted Infections of Seville, Seville, Spain

Introducción

Se diseñó un estudio prospectivo para evaluar las características del nuevo kit CT OligoGen en comparación con el test cobas 4800 para la detección de Chlamydia trachomatis.

Métodos

Se analizaron una serie de muestras que incluían orinas (n = 212), exudados endocervicales (n = 167), rectales (n = 53), faríngeos (n = 7) y uretrales (n = 3). Estas muestras provenían de un centro de infecciones de transmisión sexual (Sevilla) y pertenecían a 261 hombres y 181 mujeres. Los resultados discordantes se reanalizaron y revisaron historias clínicas y otras pruebas para resolverlas.

Resultados

Los valores de sensibilidad, especificidad, valor predictivo positivo (VPP) y negativo (VPN) y valor kappa para el kit CT OligoGen fue 98,5%, 100%, 100%, 95,4% and 0,97, respectivamente.

Conclusiones

Este nuevo kit tuvo una alta sensibilidad, especificidad, VPP y VPN para la detección de C. trachomatis, por lo que esta evaluación confirma su utilidad y fiabilidad.

PDF

http://apps.elsevier.es/watermark/ctl_servlet?_f=10&pident_articulo=90445473&pident_usuario=0&pcontactid=&pident_revista=28&ty=153&accion=L&origen=zonadelectura&web=www.elsevier.es&lan=en&fichero=28v33n10a90445473pdf001.pdf

 

March 28, 2016 at 8:39 am

Estimating Contraceptive Needs and Increasing Access to Contraception in Response to the Zika Virus Disease Outbreak — Puerto Rico, 2016

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep March 25, 2016 V.65 (Early Release)

Naomi K. Tepper, MD; Howard I. Goldberg, PhD; Manuel I. Vargas Bernal, MD; et al.

As of March 16, 2016, the highest number of Zika virus disease cases in the United States and U.S. territories were reported from Puerto Rico. Increasing evidence links Zika virus infection during pregnancy to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. High rates of unintended and adolescent pregnancies in Puerto Rico suggest access to contraception might need to be improved in the context of this outbreak.

PDF

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/pdfs/mm6512e1er.pdf

March 26, 2016 at 10:35 pm

Update: Interim Guidance for Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus — United States, 2016

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep March 25, 2016 V.65 (Early Release)

Alexandra M. Oster, MD; Kate Russell, MD; Jo Ellen Stryker, PhD; et al.

CDC issued interim guidance for the prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus on February 5, 2016. The following recommendations apply to men who have traveled to or reside in areas with active Zika virus transmission and their female or male sex partners.

These recommendations replace the previously issued recommendations and are updated to include time intervals after travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission or after Zika virus infection for taking precautions to reduce the risk for sexual transmission.

PDF

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/pdfs/mm6512e3er.pdf

March 26, 2016 at 10:32 pm

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