Posts filed under ‘Infecciones emergentes’

EDITORIAL – Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

Rev.MVZ Córdoba 20(3):4675-4676, 2015

Virus de Oropuche: Un virus ignorado pero presente

El virus de Oropouche deriva su nombre de la localidad de Vegas de Oropuche, la cual se encuentra en la isla de Trinidad y Tobago, en donde fue detectado en 1955 en un paciente febril y en mosquitos Coquilletidia venezuelenzis.

El virus de Oropouche es prevalente en muchas regiones de América del Sur y del Caribe.

En el ciclo silvestre, el virus tiene varios mosquitos vectores: Culicoides paraensis, Coquilletidia venezuelenzis y Aedes serratus.

Los mamíferos silvestres son picados por estos mosquitos y aumentan las viremias, como en el oso perezoso (Bradypus tridactiyus), primates (Aloutta sanguinus) y roedores entre otros.

En el ciclo urbano los vectores son mosquitos Culicoides paraensis y Culex quinquefasciatus, ambos muy comunes en los ambientes tropicales de Colombia …

PDF

http://www.scielo.org.co/pdf/mvz/v20n3/v20n3a01.pdf

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August 16, 2017 at 2:02 pm

Moraxella osloensis peritonitis : Case report and review.

Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Jun;29(3):161-3.

[Article in Spanish]

Hernández-Egido S1, Puerta-Mateo A, Cores-Calvo O, Ruiz-Ferraras E.

Author information

1 Sara Hernández Egido, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca Paseo de San Vicente nº 58-182 C.P. 37007 Salamanca, Spain. sathassa@hotmail.com.

PDF

http://seq.es/seq/0214-3429/29/3/hernandez26mar2016.pdf

August 2, 2017 at 4:20 pm

Moraxella osloensis, an emerging pathogen of endocarditis in immunocompromised patients?

Swiss Med Wkly. 2015 Sep 16;145:w14185.

Gagnard JC1, Hidri N2, Grillon A3, Jesel L4, Denes E5.

Author information

1 Infectious Diseases Department, Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.

2 Bacteriology Laboratory, Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.

3 Bacteriology Laboratory, Strasbourg Teaching Hospital, France.

4 Cardiology Department, Strasbourg Teaching Hospital, France.

5 CHU Dupuytren, 2 Ave Martin Luther King, LIMOGES, FRANCE.

Abstract

We report two cases of endocarditis due to Moraxella osloensis. Only one previous case of such infection has been described.

These infections occurred in immunocompromised patients (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and kidney graft associated with Hodgkin’s disease) and both patients had a favourable outcome with a complete cure of their infectious endocarditis.

This bacterium could be an emerging pathogen revealed by MALDI-TOF. Indeed, its characterisation within the Moraxella group by use of biochemistry-based methods is difficult.

Moreover, this strain could be particularly involved in immunocompromised patients.

FULL TEXT

https://smw.ch/article/doi/smw.2015.14185

August 2, 2017 at 4:17 pm

Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure — United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017

MMWR July 28, 2017 V.66 N.29 P.781-793

Update

Titilope Oduyebo, MD1; Kara D. Polen, MPH1; Henry T. Walke, MD1; Sarah Reagan-Steiner, MD1; Eva Lathrop, MD1; Ingrid B. Rabe, MBChB1; Wendi L. Kuhnert-Tallman, PhD1; Stacey W. Martin, MSc1; Allison T. Walker, PhD1; Christopher J. Gregory, MD1; Edwin W. Ades, PhD1; Darin S. Carroll, PhD1; Maria Rivera, MPH1; Janice Perez-Padilla, MPH1; Carolyn Gould, MD1; Jeffrey B. Nemhauser, MD1; C. Ben Beard, PhD1; Jennifer L. Harcourt, PhD1; Laura Viens, MD1; Michael Johansson, PhD1; Sascha R. Ellington, MSPH1; Emily Petersen, MD1; Laura A. Smith, MA1; Jessica Reichard, MPA1; Jorge Munoz-Jordan, PhD1; Michael J. Beach, PhD1; Dale A. Rose, PhD1; Ezra Barzilay, MD1; Michelle Noonan-Smith1; Denise J. Jamieson, MD1; Sherif R. Zaki, MD1; Lyle R. Petersen, MD1; Margaret A. Honein, PhD1; Dana Meaney-Delman, MD1

CDC has updated the interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure in response to 1) declining prevalence of Zika virus disease in the World Health Organization’s Region of the Americas (Americas) and 2) emerging evidence indicating prolonged detection of Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies.

Zika virus cases were first reported in the Americas during 2015–2016; however, the incidence of Zika virus disease has since declined.

As the prevalence of Zika virus disease declines, the likelihood of false-positive test results increases. In addition, emerging epidemiologic and laboratory data indicate that, as is the case with other flaviviruses, Zika virus IgM antibodies can persist beyond 12 weeks after infection.

Therefore, IgM test results cannot always reliably distinguish between an infection that occurred during the current pregnancy and one that occurred before the current pregnancy, particularly for women with possible Zika virus exposure before the current pregnancy.

These limitations should be considered when counseling pregnant women about the risks and benefits of testing for Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

This updated guidance emphasizes a shared decision-making model for testing and screening pregnant women, one in which patients and providers work together to make decisions about testing and care plans based on patient preferences and values, clinical judgment, and a balanced assessment of risks and expected outcomes…..

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/pdfs/mm6629e1.pdf

July 28, 2017 at 5:17 pm

Rapid and Accurate Molecular Identification of the Emerging Multidrug-Resistant Pathogen Candida auris

Journal of Clinical Microbiology August 2017 V.55 N.8 P.2445-2452

Milena Kordalewska, Yanan Zhao, Shawn R. Lockhart, Anuradha Chowdhary, Indira Berrio, and David S. Perlin

aPublic Health Research Institute, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Newark, New Jersey, USA

bMycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

cDepartment of Medical Mycology, Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

dClínica El Rosario, Medellín, Colombia

eMedical and Experimental Mycology Group, Corporación para Investigaciones Biológicas (CIB), Medellín, Colombia

fHospital General de Medellin Luz Castro de Gutiérrez ESE, Medellín, Colombia

Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungal pathogen causing nosocomial and invasive infections associated with high mortality. C. auris is commonly misidentified as several different yeast species by commercially available phenotypic identification platforms. Thus, there is an urgent need for a reliable diagnostic method. In this paper, we present fast, robust, easy-to-perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays to identify C. auris and related species: Candida duobushaemulonii, Candida haemulonii, and Candida lusitaniae. Targeting rDNA region nucleotide sequences, primers specific for C. auris only or C. auris and related species were designed. A panel of 140 clinical fungal isolates was used in both PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The identification results from the assays were 100% concordant with DNA sequencing results. These molecular assays overcome the deficiencies of existing phenotypic tests to identify C. auris and related species.

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/8/2445.full.pdf+html

July 26, 2017 at 9:29 am

Is This the Carbapenemase Test We’ve Been Waiting for? A Multicenter Evaluation of the Modified Carbapenem Inactivation Method

Journal of Clinical Microbiology August 2017 V.55 N.8 P.2309-2312

Susan M. Butler-Wu and April N. Abbott

aDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA

bDepartment of Pathology, Deaconess Health System, Evansville, Indiana, USA

ABSTRACT

A plethora of phenotypic methods exist for the detection of carbapenemases; however, clinical laboratories have struggled for years with accurate, objective phenotypic detection of carbapenemase activity in Enterobacteriaceae. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, V. M. Pierce et al. (J Clin Microbiol 55:2321–2333, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00193-17) report on a multicenter evaluation of the modified carbapenem inactivation method (mCIM). The high sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and ease of interpretation associated with the mCIM for Enterobacteriaceae will likely lead to its adoption by clinical laboratories.

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/8/2309.full.pdf+html

 

Journal of Clinical Microbiology August 2017 V.55 N.8 P.2321-2333

Modified Carbapenem Inactivation Method for Phenotypic Detection of Carbapenemase Production among Enterobacteriaceae

Virginia M. Pierce, Patricia J. Simner, David R. Lonsway, Darcie E. Roe-Carpenter, J. Kristie Johnson, William B. Brasso, April M. Bobenchik, Zabrina C. Lockett, Angella Charnot-Katsikas, Mary Jane Ferraro, Richard B. Thomson Jr., Stephen G. Jenkins, Brandi M. Limbago, and Sanchita Das

aDepartment of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

bDepartment of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

cDivision of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

dBeckman Coulter Diagnostics, Inc., West Sacramento, California, USA

eDepartment of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

fBD Life Sciences–Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, Maryland, USA

gDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Lifespan Academic Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

hDepartment of Pathology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA

iDepartment of Pathology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, Illinois, USA

jDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA

The ability of clinical microbiology laboratories to reliably detect carbapenemase-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CP-CRE) is an important element of the effort to prevent and contain the spread of these pathogens and an integral part of antimicrobial stewardship. All existing methods have limitations. A new, straightforward, inexpensive, and specific phenotypic method for the detection of carbapenemase production, the carbapenem inactivation method (CIM), was recently described. Here we describe a two-stage evaluation of a modified carbapenem inactivation method (mCIM), in which tryptic soy broth was substituted for water during the inactivation step and the length of this incubation was extended. A validation study was performed in a single clinical laboratory to determine the accuracy of the mCIM, followed by a nine-laboratory study to verify the reproducibility of these results and define the zone size cutoff that best discriminated between CP-CRE and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae that do not produce carbapenemases. Bacterial isolates previously characterized through whole-genome sequencing or targeted PCR as to the presence or absence of carbapenemase genes were tested for carbapenemase production using the mCIM; isolates with Ambler class A, B, and D carbapenemases, non-CP-CRE isolates, and carbapenem-susceptible isolates were included. The sensitivity of the mCIM observed in the validation study was 99% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 93% to 100%), and the specificity was 100% (95% CI, 82% to 100%). In the second stage of the study, the range of sensitivities observed across nine laboratories was 93% to 100%, with a mean of 97%; the range of specificities was 97% to 100%, with a mean of 99%. The mCIM was easy to perform and interpret for Enterobacteriaceae, with results in less than 24 h and excellent reproducibility across laboratories.

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/8/2321.full.pdf+html

 

July 26, 2017 at 9:25 am

Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis.

Emerging Infectious Diseases. May 2017 V.23 N.5 P.827-829.

Katanami Y, Hashimoto T, Takaya S, Yamamoto K, Kutsuna S, Takeshita N, Hayakawa K, Kanagawa S, Ohmagari N.

Abstract

There is no proven alternative to penicillin for treatment of maternal syphilis. We report 2 case-patients with maternal syphilis who were successfully treated without penicillin.

We used amoxicillin and probenecid for the first case-patient and amoxicillin, probenecid, and ceftriaxone for the second case-patient.

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/5/pdfs/16-1936.pdf

July 12, 2017 at 3:26 pm

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