Posts filed under ‘Infecciones en embarzadas’

Predictors of Viremia in Postpartum Women on Antiretroviral Therapy.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. January 1, 2020 V.83 N.1 P.72-80.

Background:

HIV-infected, postpartum women on antiretroviral therapy (ART) have high rates of viremia. We examined predictors of postpartum viremia in the PROMISE study.

Methods:

Women with pre-ART CD4+ T-cell counts ≥400 cells/mm3 who started ART during pregnancy were randomized postpartum to continue ART (CTART) or discontinue ART (DCART). Viral load and self-reported adherence were collected every 12 weeks, up to 144 weeks. Women in DCART reinitiated therapy when clinically indicated. Viremia was defined as 2 consecutive viral loads >1000 copies/mL after 24 weeks on ART. Adherence was dichotomized as missing versus not missing ART doses in the past 4 weeks. Predictors of viremia were examined using Cox proportional hazards regression with adherence as a time-varying covariate.

Results:

Among 802 women in the CTART arm, median age at entry was 27 years and median CD4+ T-cell count 696 cells/mm3. Of 175 women in CTART with viremia (22%), 141 had resistance data, and 12% had resistance to their current regimen. There was an estimated 0.12 probability of viremia by week 48 and 0.25 by week 144. Predictors of viremia included missed ART doses within the past 4 weeks, younger age, shorter duration of pre-entry ART, and being from the South American/Caribbean region. Of 137 women in DCART who reinitiated therapy, probability of viremia was similar to CTART (0.24 by week 96; 0.27 by week 144).

Conclusions:

Rates of postpartum viremia are high and viremia is more likely in younger postpartum women who start ART later in pregnancy. Interventions should target these higher-risk women.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/jaids/Fulltext/2020/01010/Predictors_of_Viremia_in_Postpartum_Women_on.10.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

January 1, 2020 at 11:39 am

Prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infection after operative vaginal delivery (ANODE): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10.189 P.2395–2403

Prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infection after operative vaginal delivery (ANODE): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

Background

Risk factors for maternal infection are clearly recognised, including caesarean section and operative vaginal birth. Antibiotic prophylaxis at caesarean section is widely recommended because there is clear systematic review evidence that it reduces incidence of maternal infection. Current WHO guidelines do not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis for women undergoing operative vaginal birth because of insufficient evidence of effectiveness. We aimed to investigate whether antibiotic prophylaxis prevented maternal infection after operative vaginal birth.

Methods

In a blinded, randomised controlled trial done at 27 UK obstetric units, women (aged ≥16 years) were allocated to receive a single dose of intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid or placebo (saline) following operative vaginal birth at 36 weeks gestation or later. The primary outcome was confirmed or suspected maternal infection within 6 weeks of delivery defined by a new prescription of antibiotics for specific indications, confirmed systemic infection on culture, or endometritis. We did an intention-to-treat analysis. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number 11166984, and is closed to accrual.

Findings

Between March 13, 2016, and June 13, 2018, 3427 women were randomly assigned to treatment: 1719 to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, and 1708 to placebo. Seven women withdrew, leaving 1715 in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid group and 1705 in the placebo groups. Primary outcome data were missing for 195 (6%) women. Significantly fewer women allocated to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid had a confirmed or suspected infection (180 [11%] of 1619) than women allocated to placebo (306 [19%] of 1606; risk ratio 0·58, 95% CI 0·49–0·69; p<0·0001). One woman in the placebo group reported a skin rash and two women in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid reported other allergic reactions, one of which was reported as a serious adverse event. Two other serious adverse events were reported, neither was considered causally related to the treatment.

Interpretation

This trial shows benefit of a single dose of prophylactic antibiotic after operative vaginal birth and guidance from WHO and other national organisations should be changed to reflect this.

Funding

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30773-1/fulltext

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930773-1

November 8, 2019 at 8:09 pm

Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Mononucleosis as an Imitator of Severe Preeclampsia.

AJP Rep. january 2017 V.7 N.1 :e5-e7. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1597265.

Staley SA1, Smid MC2, Dotters-Katz SK2, Stringer EM2.

1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

2 Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

Background

In pregnancy, conditions presenting with hematologic abnormalities, transaminitis, and proteinuria pose diagnostic challenges in pregnancy.

Case

We present the case of an 18-year-old woman, G1P0, at 33 weeks’ gestation with fever of unknown cause, who developed progressively elevated liver enzymes, proteinuria, and thrombocytopenia, due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection.

Conclusion

Acute infection with EBV should be included in the differential diagnosis of preeclampsia with severe features, particularly in the setting of fever. Supportive treatment and observation may prevent iatrogenic preterm birth.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5303016/pdf/10-1055-s-0036-1597265.pdf

August 18, 2019 at 7:36 pm

Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus in the Human Placenta and Its Pathologic Characteristics.

J Korean Med Sci. December 2017 V.32 N.12 P.1959-1966. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2017.32.12.1959.

Kim Y1,2, Kim HS3, Park JS3, Kim CJ4, Kim WH5.

1 Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

2 Laboratory of Epigenetics, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

4 Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

5 Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. woohokim@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a common pathogen in humans, is suspected as the cause of multiple pregnancy-related pathologies including depression, preeclampsia, and stillbirth. Moreover, transmission of EBV through the placenta has been reported. However, the focus of EBV infection within the placenta has remained unknown to date. In this study, we proved the expression of latent EBV genes in the endometrial glandular epithelial cells of the placenta and investigated the cytological characteristics of these cells. Sixty-eight placentas were obtained from pregnant women. Tissue microarray was constructed. EBV latent genes including EBV-encoding RNA-1 (EBER1), Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1), late membrane antigen (LMP1), and RPMS1 were detected with silver in situ hybridization and/or mRNA in situ hybridization. Nuclear features of EBV-positive cells in EBV-infected placenta were compared with those of EBV-negative cells via image analysis. Sixteen placentas (23.5%) showed positive expression of all 4 EBV latent genes; only the glandular epithelial cells of the decidua showed EBV gene expression. EBV infection status was not significantly correlated with maternal, fetal, or placental factors. The nuclei of EBV-positive cells were significantly larger, longer, and round-shaped than those of EBV-negative cells regardless of EBV-infection status of the placenta. For the first time, evidence of EBV gene expression has been shown in placental tissues. Furthermore, we have characterized its cytological features, allowing screening of EBV infection through microscopic examination.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680494/pdf/jkms-32-1959.pdf

August 18, 2019 at 7:35 pm

Building an innovative Chagas disease program for primary care units, in an urban non- endemic city

BMC Public Healthvolume 19, Article number: 904 (2019

Background

On an absolute basis, Argentina is the country with the largest affected population with Chagas Disease (ChD). This constitutes a significant public health issue. As a consequence of Argentina’s migratory patterns, there has been a significant increase of affected population in urban centers. An innovative project for early diagnosis and timely treatment of ChD was designed for Municipal Primary Care Facilities of La Plata City, a non- endemic area, in line with a proposal from the Pan-American Health Organization. The project was a public –private intervention. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the feasibility of the primary healthcare level for early diagnosis and timely treatment of ChD; to design and implement a tailor made program and to innovate in a public-private association.

Methods

The healthcare barriers for early diagnosis and timely treatment for the population with ChD of La Plata were analyzed. The four dimensions described by Peters et al. (Ann N Y Acad Sci 1136:161–71, 2008) were used. The baseline was measured during a previous pilot project and the same items were evaluated at the end of 2017. The model from Damschroder et al. (Implement Sci 4:50, 2009) was used during the implementation process.

Results

With all the information gathered during this investigation, a “patient-centered” model was designed. During the program, 17,894 people were serologically tested for ChD, 1,394 were positive and 1,035 were treated. Additionally, 3,750 children from 46 public schools were evaluated for risk factors of ChD.

Conclusions

This project showed the feasibility of the primary healthcare level for early diagnosis and timely treatment of ChD. Tailor made programs and public-private associations should be considered for vulnerable populations in emerging economies in order to enhance efforts and obtain better results. This program may be replicated in other countries of Latin America were Chagas is a main public health issue and, with the corresponding adaptations, for other neglected diseases as well.

FULL TEXT

https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-019-7248-5

PDF

https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12889-019-7248-5

July 24, 2019 at 8:15 am

Group B Streptococcus in surgical site and non-invasive bacterial infections worldwide: A systematic review and meta-analysis

International Journal of Infectious Diseases June 2019 V.83 P.116-129

Simon M. Collin, Nandini Shetty, Rebecca Guy, Victoria N. Nyaga, Ann Bull, Michael J. Richards, Tjallie I.I. van der Kooi, Mayke B.G. Koek, Mary De Almeida, Sally A. Roberts, Theresa Lamagni

Highlights

  • This review obtained data on group B Streptococcus infection from 67 countries.
  • Group B Streptococcus is implicated in a small proportion of non-invasive infections.
  • Group B Streptococcus causes 10% of caesarean section invasive surgical infections.

Objectives

The epidemiology of disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) outside pregnancy and the neonatal period is poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to quantify the role of GBS as a cause of surgical site and non-invasive infections at all ages.

Methods

A systematic review (PROSPERO CRD42017068914) and meta-analysis of GBS as a proportion (%) of bacterial isolates from surgical site infection (SSI), skin/soft tissue infection (SSTI), urinary tract infection (UTI), and respiratory tract infection (RTI) was conducted.

Results

Seventy-four studies and data sources were included, covering 67 countries. In orthopaedic surgery, GBS accounted for 0.37% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–1.68%), 0.87% (95% CI 0.33–2.28%), and 1.46% (95% CI 0.49–4.29%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI, respectively. GBS played a more significant role as a cause of post-caesarean section SSI, detected in 2.92% (95% CI 1.51–5.55%), 1.93% (95% CI 0.97–3.81%), and 9.69% (95% CI 6.72–13.8%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI. Of the SSTI isolates, 1.89% (95% CI 1.16–3.05%) were GBS. The prevalence of GBS in community and hospital UTI isolates was 1.61% (1.13–2.30%) and 0.73% (0.43–1.23%), respectively. GBS was uncommonly associated with RTI, accounting for 0.35% (95% CI 0.19–0.63%) of community and 0.27% (95% CI 0.15–0.48%) of hospital RTI isolates.

Conclusions

GBS is implicated in a small proportion of surgical site and non-invasive infections, but a substantial proportion of invasive SSI post-caesarean section.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/pdf

 

 

June 30, 2019 at 12:21 pm

American trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease – Sexual transmission

International Journal of Infectious Diseases April 2019 V.81 N.4 P.81-84

Clever Gomes, Adriana B. Almeida, Ana C. Rosa, Perla F. Araujo, Antonio R.L. Teixeira

Highlights

  • Trypanosoma cruzi infection can be transmitted sexually from males and females to naïve mates.
  • T. cruzi parasites were detected in semen ejaculates from individuals with Chagas disease by nucleic acid techniques.
  • Semen aliquots from humans with Chagas disease instilled into the vagina of naïve female mice resulted in T. cruzi infections.
  • Breeding T. cruzi-infected male and female mice vertically transmitted the infection to progeny mice.

Objective

To contribute to the discussion on the research findings indicating the sexual transmission of American trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease in humans.

Methods

A review of the literature was performed to investigate the routes of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites and to evaluate the distribution of Chagas disease, which is now found across five continents.

Results

The epidemiological profile of American trypanosomiasis, which is still considered a neglected disease of the poor people of Latin America, has changed over time. A family-based study demonstrated that the blood protozoan T. cruzi can be transmitted sexually from infected males and females to naïve mates.

Conclusions

Evidence that Chagas disease can be transmitted sexually, coupled with the migration of individuals with Chagas disease to previously non-endemic countries and increased travel to endemic countries, has implications for public health. Improved screening of blood supplies and prenatal care are required to prevent congenital spread.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30032-3/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30032-3/pdf

June 30, 2019 at 12:18 pm

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