Posts filed under ‘Infecciones en embarzadas’

Pregnant Women Hospitalized with Chikungunya Virus Infection, Colombia, 2015

Emerging Infectious Diseases November 2017 V.23 N.11

Maria Escobar, Albaro J. Nieto, Sara Loaiza-Osorio, Juan S. Barona, and Fernando Rosso

Fundación Clínica Valle del Lili, Cali, Colombia (M. Escobar, A.J. Nieto, S. Loaiza-Osorio, F. Rosso); Icesi University, Cali (M. Escobar, A.J. Nieto, J.S. Barona, F. Rosso)

In 2015 in Colombia, 60 pregnant women were hospitalized with chikungunya virus infections confirmed by reverse transcription PCR.

Nine of these women required admission to the intensive care unit because of sepsis with hypoperfusion and organ dysfunction; these women met the criteria for severe acute maternal morbidity. No deaths occurred.

Fifteen women delivered during acute infection; some received tocolytics to delay delivery until after the febrile episode and prevent possible vertical transmission. As recommended by a pediatric neonatologist, 12 neonates were hospitalized to rule out vertical transmission; no clinical findings suggestive of neonatal chikungunya virus infection were observed.

With 36 women (60%), follow-up was performed 1 year after acute viremia; 13 patients had arthralgia in >2 joints (a relapse of infection).

Despite disease severity, pregnant women with chikungunya should be treated in high-complexity obstetric units to rule out adverse outcomes. These women should also be followed up to treat potential relapses.

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/11/pdfs/17-0480.pdf

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October 18, 2017 at 8:27 am

Antiretroviral therapy in pregnant women living with HIV: A clinical practice guideline.

BMJ 2017 Sep 11; 358:j3961.

Siemieniuk RAC et al.

Approximately 1.4 million women living with HIV become pregnant every year. Most women use antiretroviral therapy, to reduce the risk of vertical transmission or for personal health reasons. Using the GRADE framework according to the BMJ Rapid Recommendation process, we make recommendations for optimal choice of combination antiretroviral regimen considering patient values and preferences, the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, their uncertainty, and practical issues. We suggest a zidovudine and lamivudine-based regimen over one that includes tenofovir or emtricitabine (weak recommendation). We recommend alternatives over the combination of tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir/ritonavir (strong recommendation).

FULL TEXT

http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3961

PDF

http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/358/bmj.j3961.full.pdf

October 5, 2017 at 9:52 am

Specific Biomarkers Associated With Neurological Complications and Congenital Central Nervous System Abnormalities From Zika Virus–Infected Patients in Brazil

Journal of Infectious Diseases July 15, 2017 V.216 N.2 P.172–181

Yiu-Wing Kam; Juliana Almeida Leite; Fok-Moon Lum; Jeslin J L Tan; Bernett Lee …

Background

Zika virus (ZIKV) infections have been linked to different levels of clinical outcomes, ranging from mild rash and fever to severe neurological complications and congenital malformations.

Methods

We investigated the clinical and immunological response, focusing on the immune mediators profile in 95 acute ZIKV-infected adult patients from Campinas, Brazil. These patients included 6 pregnant women who later delivered during the course of this study. Clinical observations were recorded during hospitalization. Levels of 45 immune mediators were quantified using multiplex microbead-based immunoassays.

Results

Whereas 11.6% of patients had neurological complications, 88.4% displayed mild disease of rash and fever. Several immune mediators were specifically higher in ZIKV-infected patients, and levels of interleukin 10, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10), and hepatocyte growth factor differentiated between patients with or without neurological complications. Interestingly, higher levels of interleukin 22, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, TNF-α, and IP-10 were observed in ZIKV-infected pregnant women carrying fetuses with fetal growth–associated malformations. Notably, infants with congenital central nervous system deformities had significantly higher levels of interleukin 18 and IP-10 but lower levels of hepatocyte growth factor than those without such abnormalities born to ZIKV-infected mothers.

Conclusions

This study identified several key markers for the control of ZIKV pathogenesis. This will allow a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ZIKV infection in patients.

PDF

https://watermark.silverchair.com/api/watermark?token=AQECAHi208BE49Ooan9kkhW_Ercy7Dm3ZL_9Cf3qfKAc485ysgAAAdgwggHUBgkqhkiG9w0BBwagggHFMIIBwQIBADCCAboGCSqGSIb3DQEHATAeBglghkgBZQMEAS4wEQQMuj_a-VAMddE_zlaHAgEQgIIBi63-XH3OORdTvNkyg01iIpJuW3POLRfocSGreL0dwgD_6lfvv3yIkhP83MPEjgbyM9hazTt8DxQ_2IqEP6eND0h1g-VCwKcveB1byxBTEz8KSJ33u-ZLO-0iet2RmKK6HMazACV8sW8KfaiLYfdKTUnyv4RSn2jfuq4U0F2hnTo_1WGmLFnsCrbfRbbQHnrudA9e_MPedHJfZAnRm53kkbzUtza0KfnfJx80cCVKJu2wGYXY5INohc43UMAEgsI2wAbXr7Xwd2RE8CXHlNPJnhI8YYhhjz_Yj4dnOfsSbzwL0inCX7tnqdFt5GsWbaM7Oa3zpl391yhxwE1HYUvCOZnyEAQpu2XTB_4h6ko7T1WDr_Jd-4H9W1HtVK1_ILzddKywF3yVCYmk35oC1RXv9gPslai0Hkjlpnb46k9VPEeQOOhXMzRYU7koX2RpuWfXAah7nfzaS0evT50mVl2GoS7mcMwtfDNFOCP_5mujf0ZaGhrTLgav_RbLq-dKMQA7DP0LVlBEsjtL61zI

September 27, 2017 at 8:50 am

Impact of intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis upon the intestinal microbiota and the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in vaginally delivered full-term neonates.

Microbiome. August 8, 2017 V.5 N.1 P.93.

Nogacka A1, Salazar N1, Suárez M2, Milani C3, Arboleya S1,4, Solís G2, Fernández N2, Alaez L1, Hernández-Barranco AM1, de Los Reyes-Gavilán CG1, Ventura M3, Gueimonde M5.

Author information

1 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry of Dairy Products, Instituto de Productos Lácteos de Asturias. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPLA-CSIC), Ctra. Infiesto s/n, 33300, Villaviciosa, Asturias, Spain.

2 Pediatrics Service, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, SESPA, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.

3 Laboratory of Probiogenomics, Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

4 Current address: APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork. Cork, Ireland & Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Cork, Ireland.

5 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry of Dairy Products, Instituto de Productos Lácteos de Asturias. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPLA-CSIC), Ctra. Infiesto s/n, 33300, Villaviciosa, Asturias, Spain. mgueimonde@ipla.csic.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Disturbances in the early establishment of the intestinal microbiota may produce important implications for the infant’s health and for the risk of disease later on. Different perinatal conditions may be affecting the development of the gut microbiota. Some of them, such as delivery mode or feeding habits, have been extensively assessed whereas others remain to be studied, being critical to identify their impact on the microbiota and, if any, to minimize it. Antibiotics are among the drugs most frequently used in early life, the use of intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis (IAP), present in over 30% of deliveries, being the most frequent source of exposure. However, our knowledge on the effects of IAP on the microbiota establishment is still limited. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the impact of IAP investigating a cohort of 40 full-term vaginally delivered infants born after an uncomplicated pregnancy, 18 of which were born from mothers receiving IAP.

RESULTS:

Fecal samples were collected at 2, 10, 30, and 90 days of age. We analyzed the composition of the fecal microbiota during the first 3 months of life by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantified fecal short chain fatty acids by gas chromatography. The presence of genes for resistance to antibiotics was determined by PCR in the samples from 1-month-old infants. Our results showed an altered pattern of intestinal microbiota establishment in IAP infants during the first weeks of life, with lower relative proportions of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes and increased of Preoteobacteria and Firmicutes. A delay in the increase on the levels of acetate was observed in IAP infants. The analyses of specific antibiotic resistance genes showed a higher occurrence of some β-lactamase coding genes in infants whose mothers received IAP.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate an effect of IAP on the establishing early microbiota during the first months of life, which represent a key moment for the development of the microbiota-induced host homeostasis. Understanding the impact of IAP in the gut microbiota development is essential for developing treatments to minimize it, favoring a proper gut microbiota development in IAP-exposed neonates.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5549288/pdf/40168_2017_Article_313.pdf

August 22, 2017 at 3:43 pm

Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women with Possible Zika Virus Exposure — United States (Including U.S. Territories), July 2017

MMWR July 28, 2017 V.66 N.29 P.781-793

Update

Titilope Oduyebo, MD1; Kara D. Polen, MPH1; Henry T. Walke, MD1; Sarah Reagan-Steiner, MD1; Eva Lathrop, MD1; Ingrid B. Rabe, MBChB1; Wendi L. Kuhnert-Tallman, PhD1; Stacey W. Martin, MSc1; Allison T. Walker, PhD1; Christopher J. Gregory, MD1; Edwin W. Ades, PhD1; Darin S. Carroll, PhD1; Maria Rivera, MPH1; Janice Perez-Padilla, MPH1; Carolyn Gould, MD1; Jeffrey B. Nemhauser, MD1; C. Ben Beard, PhD1; Jennifer L. Harcourt, PhD1; Laura Viens, MD1; Michael Johansson, PhD1; Sascha R. Ellington, MSPH1; Emily Petersen, MD1; Laura A. Smith, MA1; Jessica Reichard, MPA1; Jorge Munoz-Jordan, PhD1; Michael J. Beach, PhD1; Dale A. Rose, PhD1; Ezra Barzilay, MD1; Michelle Noonan-Smith1; Denise J. Jamieson, MD1; Sherif R. Zaki, MD1; Lyle R. Petersen, MD1; Margaret A. Honein, PhD1; Dana Meaney-Delman, MD1

CDC has updated the interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure in response to 1) declining prevalence of Zika virus disease in the World Health Organization’s Region of the Americas (Americas) and 2) emerging evidence indicating prolonged detection of Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies.

Zika virus cases were first reported in the Americas during 2015–2016; however, the incidence of Zika virus disease has since declined.

As the prevalence of Zika virus disease declines, the likelihood of false-positive test results increases. In addition, emerging epidemiologic and laboratory data indicate that, as is the case with other flaviviruses, Zika virus IgM antibodies can persist beyond 12 weeks after infection.

Therefore, IgM test results cannot always reliably distinguish between an infection that occurred during the current pregnancy and one that occurred before the current pregnancy, particularly for women with possible Zika virus exposure before the current pregnancy.

These limitations should be considered when counseling pregnant women about the risks and benefits of testing for Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

This updated guidance emphasizes a shared decision-making model for testing and screening pregnant women, one in which patients and providers work together to make decisions about testing and care plans based on patient preferences and values, clinical judgment, and a balanced assessment of risks and expected outcomes…..

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/pdfs/mm6629e1.pdf

July 28, 2017 at 5:17 pm

Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis.

Emerging Infectious Diseases. May 2017 V.23 N.5 P.827-829.

Katanami Y, Hashimoto T, Takaya S, Yamamoto K, Kutsuna S, Takeshita N, Hayakawa K, Kanagawa S, Ohmagari N.

Abstract

There is no proven alternative to penicillin for treatment of maternal syphilis. We report 2 case-patients with maternal syphilis who were successfully treated without penicillin.

We used amoxicillin and probenecid for the first case-patient and amoxicillin, probenecid, and ceftriaxone for the second case-patient.

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/5/pdfs/16-1936.pdf

July 12, 2017 at 3:26 pm

SOMANZ guidelines for the investigation and management sepsis in pregnancy.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. July 3, 2017    

Bowyer L1, Robinson HL2, Barrett H3, Crozier TM4, Giles M5,6, Idel I7, Lowe S8, Lust K9, Marnoch CA10, Morton MR11, Said J12,13, Wong M14, Makris A15,16.

Author information

1 Maternal Fetal Medicine, Royal Hospital for Women, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

2 Department of Medicine, Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich, Queensland, Australia.

3 Department of Obstetric Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

4 Intensive Care, Monash Medical Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

5 Department of Infectious Diseases, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

6 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

7 Department of Nephrology, Eastern Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

8 Royal Hospital for Women, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

9 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

10 Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand.

11 Women’s and Babies Division, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

12 Department of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Sunshine Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

13 Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

14 Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

15 Department of Nephrology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia.

16 Department of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

SOMANZ (Society of Obstetric Medicine Australia and New Zealand) has written a guideline to provide evidence-based guidance for the investigation and care of women with sepsis in pregnancy or the postpartum period.

The guideline is evidence-based and incorporates recent changes in the definition of sepsis. The etiology, investigation and treatment of bacterial, viral and non-infective causes of sepsis are discussed.

Obstetric considerations relevant to anaesthetic and intensive care treatment in sepsis are also addressed. A multi-disciplinary group of clinicians with experience in all aspects of the care of pregnant women have contributed to the development of the guidelines.

This is an executive summary of the guidelines.

abstract

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ajo.12646/abstract

PDF

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ajo.12646/epdf

July 11, 2017 at 3:42 pm

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