Posts filed under ‘Infecciones en seniles’

A systems biology approach to the effect of aging, immunosenescence and vaccine response.

Current Opinion in Immunology August 2014 V.29 P.62-8.

Poland GA1, Ovsyannikova IG2, Kennedy RB2, Lambert ND2, Kirkland JL3.

Author information

1 Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address:

2 Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

3 Robert & Arlene Kogod Center on Aging, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.


Aging can lead to immunosenescence, which dramatically impairs the hosts’ ability to develop protective immune responses to vaccine antigens. Reasons for this are not well understood.

This topic’s importance is reflected in the increases in morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases among elderly persons, a population growing in size globally, and the significantly lower adaptive immune responses generated to vaccines in this population.

Here, we endeavor to summarize the existing data on the genetic and immunologic correlates of immunosenescence with respect to vaccine response.

We cover how the application of systems biology can advance our understanding of vaccine immunosenescence, with a view toward how such information could lead to strategies to overcome the lower immunogenicity of vaccines in the elderly.



February 19, 2018 at 9:12 am

The microbiota and microbiome in aging: potential implications in health and age-related diseases.

J Am Geriatr Soc. April 2015 V.63 N.4 P.776-81.

Zapata HJ1, Quagliarello VJ.

Author information

1 Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.


Advances in bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing allow for characterization of the human commensal bacterial community (microbiota) and its corresponding genome (microbiome).

Surveys of healthy adults reveal that a signature composite of bacteria characterizes each unique body habitat (e.g., gut, skin, oral cavity, vagina).

A myriad of clinical changes, including a basal proinflammatory state (inflamm-aging), that directly interface with the microbiota of older adults and enhance susceptibility to disease accompany aging.

Studies in older adults demonstrate that the gut microbiota correlates with diet, location of residence (e.g., community dwelling, long-term care settings), and basal level of inflammation.

Links exist between the microbiota and a variety of clinical problems plaguing older adults, including physical frailty, Clostridium difficile colitis, vulvovaginal atrophy, colorectal carcinoma, and atherosclerotic disease.

Manipulation of the microbiota and microbiome of older adults holds promise as an innovative strategy to influence the development of comorbidities associated with aging.


February 19, 2018 at 9:11 am

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

Reumatol Clin. 2017 Mar 7. 

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Molina Collada J1, Rico Nieto A2, Díaz de Bustamante Ussia M3, Balsa Criado A4.

Author information

1 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address:

2 Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

3 Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

4 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.


We describe a case of septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum, gram-positive bacilli that are usually commensal organisms of skin and mucosal membranes, but are seldom implicated in native septic arthritis. An 84-year-old man with Corynebacterium striatum septic arthritis of his native left knee and no response to conventional antibiotic therapy. Thus, the patient was allowed to take dalbavancin for compassionate use, with an excellent clinical outcome. This case emphasizes de role of Corynebacterium striatum in native joint infections and highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate treatment in improving the clinical outcome.



October 22, 2017 at 12:43 pm

Septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2014 May;52(5):1786-8.

Westblade LF1, Shams F, Duong S, Tariq O, Bulbin A, Klirsfeld D, Zhen W, Sakaria S, Ford BA, Burnham CA, Ginocchio CC.

Author information

1 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York, USA.


We report a case of septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum, a rare and unusual cause of septic arthritis of native joints. The isolate was identified by a combination of phenotypic, mass spectrometric, and nucleic acid-based assays and exhibited high-level resistance to most antimicrobials.



October 22, 2017 at 12:41 pm

A spontaneous joint infection with Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Feb;45(2):656-8.

Scholle D1.

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, Legacy Emanuel and Good Samaritan Hospitals, 1015 NW 22nd Ave., Portland, OR 97210, USA.


Corynebacterium striatum is a ubiquitous saprophyte with the potential to cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. Until now, spontaneous infection of a natural joint has not been reported. When phenotyping failed, gene sequencing was used to identify the species. The isolate demonstrated high-level resistance to most antibiotics.




October 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm

Efficacy of indefinite chronic oral antimicrobial suppression for prosthetic joint infection in the elderly: a comparative study

International Journal of Infectious Diseases July 2017 V.60 N.7 P.57-60


  1. Prendki, P. Sergent, A. Barrelet, E. Oziol, E. Beretti, M. Berlioz-Thibal, F. Bouchand, F.A. Dauchy, E. Forestier, G. Gavazzi, C. Ronde-Oustau, J. Stirnemann, A. Dinh


  • Antimicrobial suppression appears to be effective for prosthetic joint infection (PJI).
  • Antimicrobial suppression appears safe for PJI.
  • Antimicrobial suppression is an adequate option for elderly patients with PJI.


During prosthetic joint infection (PJI), surgical management is sometimes impossible and indefinite chronic oral antimicrobial suppression (ICOAS) may be the only option. The outcomes of elderly patients who benefited from ICOAS with strictly palliative intent were evaluated.


A national retrospective cohort study was performed in France, involving patients aged >75 years with a PJI who were managed with planned life-long ICOAS from 2009 to 2014. Patients who experienced an event were compared to those who did not. An event was defined as a composite outcome in patients undergoing ICOAS, including local or systemic progression of the infection, death, or discontinuation of antimicrobial therapy because of an adverse drug reaction.


Twenty-one patients were included, with a median age of 85 years (interquartile range 81–88 years). Eight of the 21 patients experienced an event: one had an adverse drug reaction, three had systemic progression of sepsis, and two had local progression. Two of the 21 patients died. No death was related to ICOAS or infection. There was no significant difference between the population with an event and the population free of an event with regard to demographic, clinical, and microbiological characteristics (p > 0.05).


ICOAS appeared to be an effective and safe option in this cohort.




July 30, 2017 at 12:54 pm

Prevalence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria among nursing home residents: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

American Journal of Infection Control May 1, 2017 V.45 N.5 P.512-518

Sainfer Aliyu, MPhil, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN’MPhil, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN Sainfer Aliyu, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN Sainfer Aliyu, Arlene Smaldone, PhD, CPNP, CDE, Elaine Larson, PhD, RN, CIC, FAAN


  • Multidrug resistant-gram negative bacteria colonization ranged from 11.2%-59.1%.
  • E coli accounted for the largest proportion of isolates.
  • The most common site of colonization was rectal, followed by nasal, sputum, urinary tract and wound.
  • Colonization was significantly higher in studies conducted in United States (38%) compared to other countries (14%).


Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) are associated with an increasing proportion of infections among nursing home (NH) residents. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to critically review evidence of the prevalence of MDR-GNB among NH residents.


Following Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines, a systematic review of literature for the years 2005-2016 using multiple databases was conducted. Study quality, appraised by 2 reviewers, used Downs and Black risk of bias criteria. Studies reporting prevalence of MDR-GNB colonization were pooled using a random effects meta-analysis model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran Q and I2 statistics.


Of 327 articles, 12 met the criteria for review; of these, 8 met the criteria for meta-analysis. Escherichia coli accounted for the largest proportion of isolates. Reported MDR-GNB colonization prevalence ranged from 11.2%-59.1%. Pooled prevalence for MDR-GNB colonization, representing data from 2,720 NH residents, was 27% (95% confidence interval, 15.2%-44.1%) with heterogeneity (Q = 405.6; P = .01; I2 = 98.3). Two studies reported MDR-GNB infection rates of 10.9% and 62.7%.


Our findings suggest a high prevalence of MDR-GNB colonization among NH residents, emphasizing the need to enhance policies for infection control and prevention (ICP) in NHs.





June 9, 2017 at 8:08 am

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