Posts filed under ‘Infecciones en seniles’

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

Reumatol Clin. 2017 Mar 7. 

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Molina Collada J1, Rico Nieto A2, Díaz de Bustamante Ussia M3, Balsa Criado A4.

Author information

1 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: molinacolladajuan@gmail.com.

2 Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

3 Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

4 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

Abstract

We describe a case of septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum, gram-positive bacilli that are usually commensal organisms of skin and mucosal membranes, but are seldom implicated in native septic arthritis. An 84-year-old man with Corynebacterium striatum septic arthritis of his native left knee and no response to conventional antibiotic therapy. Thus, the patient was allowed to take dalbavancin for compassionate use, with an excellent clinical outcome. This case emphasizes de role of Corynebacterium striatum in native joint infections and highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate treatment in improving the clinical outcome.

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

http://www.reumatologiaclinica.org/es/linkresolver/artritis-septica-rodilla-nativa-por/S1699258X17300335/

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October 22, 2017 at 12:43 pm

Septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2014 May;52(5):1786-8.

Westblade LF1, Shams F, Duong S, Tariq O, Bulbin A, Klirsfeld D, Zhen W, Sakaria S, Ford BA, Burnham CA, Ginocchio CC.

Author information

1 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York, USA.

Abstract

We report a case of septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum, a rare and unusual cause of septic arthritis of native joints. The isolate was identified by a combination of phenotypic, mass spectrometric, and nucleic acid-based assays and exhibited high-level resistance to most antimicrobials.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3993712/pdf/zjm1786.pdf

October 22, 2017 at 12:41 pm

A spontaneous joint infection with Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Feb;45(2):656-8.

Scholle D1.

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, Legacy Emanuel and Good Samaritan Hospitals, 1015 NW 22nd Ave., Portland, OR 97210, USA. dscholle@fastmail.fm

Abstract

Corynebacterium striatum is a ubiquitous saprophyte with the potential to cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. Until now, spontaneous infection of a natural joint has not been reported. When phenotyping failed, gene sequencing was used to identify the species. The isolate demonstrated high-level resistance to most antibiotics.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1829050/pdf/0827-06.pdf

 

October 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm

Efficacy of indefinite chronic oral antimicrobial suppression for prosthetic joint infection in the elderly: a comparative study

International Journal of Infectious Diseases July 2017 V.60 N.7 P.57-60

 

  1. Prendki, P. Sergent, A. Barrelet, E. Oziol, E. Beretti, M. Berlioz-Thibal, F. Bouchand, F.A. Dauchy, E. Forestier, G. Gavazzi, C. Ronde-Oustau, J. Stirnemann, A. Dinh

Highlights

  • Antimicrobial suppression appears to be effective for prosthetic joint infection (PJI).
  • Antimicrobial suppression appears safe for PJI.
  • Antimicrobial suppression is an adequate option for elderly patients with PJI.

Background

During prosthetic joint infection (PJI), surgical management is sometimes impossible and indefinite chronic oral antimicrobial suppression (ICOAS) may be the only option. The outcomes of elderly patients who benefited from ICOAS with strictly palliative intent were evaluated.

Methods

A national retrospective cohort study was performed in France, involving patients aged >75 years with a PJI who were managed with planned life-long ICOAS from 2009 to 2014. Patients who experienced an event were compared to those who did not. An event was defined as a composite outcome in patients undergoing ICOAS, including local or systemic progression of the infection, death, or discontinuation of antimicrobial therapy because of an adverse drug reaction.

Results

Twenty-one patients were included, with a median age of 85 years (interquartile range 81–88 years). Eight of the 21 patients experienced an event: one had an adverse drug reaction, three had systemic progression of sepsis, and two had local progression. Two of the 21 patients died. No death was related to ICOAS or infection. There was no significant difference between the population with an event and the population free of an event with regard to demographic, clinical, and microbiological characteristics (p > 0.05).

Conclusions

ICOAS appeared to be an effective and safe option in this cohort.

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30144-3/pdf

 

July 30, 2017 at 12:54 pm

Prevalence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria among nursing home residents: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

American Journal of Infection Control May 1, 2017 V.45 N.5 P.512-518

Sainfer Aliyu, MPhil, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN’MPhil, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN Sainfer Aliyu, MSEd, MHPM, BSN, RN Sainfer Aliyu, Arlene Smaldone, PhD, CPNP, CDE, Elaine Larson, PhD, RN, CIC, FAAN

Highlights

  • Multidrug resistant-gram negative bacteria colonization ranged from 11.2%-59.1%.
  • E coli accounted for the largest proportion of isolates.
  • The most common site of colonization was rectal, followed by nasal, sputum, urinary tract and wound.
  • Colonization was significantly higher in studies conducted in United States (38%) compared to other countries (14%).

Background

Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) are associated with an increasing proportion of infections among nursing home (NH) residents. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to critically review evidence of the prevalence of MDR-GNB among NH residents.

Methods

Following Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines, a systematic review of literature for the years 2005-2016 using multiple databases was conducted. Study quality, appraised by 2 reviewers, used Downs and Black risk of bias criteria. Studies reporting prevalence of MDR-GNB colonization were pooled using a random effects meta-analysis model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran Q and I2 statistics.

Results

Of 327 articles, 12 met the criteria for review; of these, 8 met the criteria for meta-analysis. Escherichia coli accounted for the largest proportion of isolates. Reported MDR-GNB colonization prevalence ranged from 11.2%-59.1%. Pooled prevalence for MDR-GNB colonization, representing data from 2,720 NH residents, was 27% (95% confidence interval, 15.2%-44.1%) with heterogeneity (Q = 405.6; P = .01; I2 = 98.3). Two studies reported MDR-GNB infection rates of 10.9% and 62.7%.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest a high prevalence of MDR-GNB colonization among NH residents, emphasizing the need to enhance policies for infection control and prevention (ICP) in NHs.

FULL TEXT

http://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(17)30085-8/fulltext

PDF

http://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(17)30085-8/pdf

 

June 9, 2017 at 8:08 am

A Case of Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder Due to Yersinia enterocolitica with Review of the Literature.

Open Forum Infect Dis. 2014 Aug 2;1(2):ofu054

BRIEF REPORT

Chan J1, Gandhi RT1.

Author information

1 Infectious Diseases Division , Massachusetts General Hospital , Boston, MA.

Abstract

Yersinia enterocolitica infection rarely can cause extra-intestinal infections. We present a case of septic arthritis of the shoulder due to this organism in an elderly man with liver and cardiac disease. We review previously published cases of Y. enterocolitica septic arthritis, and discuss risk factors and management.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4281793/pdf/ofu054.pdf

May 7, 2017 at 2:53 pm

Atypical Presentation of Disseminated Zoster in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Case Rep Med. 2015;2015:124840.     

Patel N1, Singh D1, Patel K1, Ahmed S1, Anand P1.

Author information

1Department of Medicine, Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, NY 11554, USA.

Abstract

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have 2-fold increased risk of herpes zoster. In literature, limited information exists about disseminated cutaneous zoster in RA patients. An 83-year-old African-American female with RA presented with generalized and widespread vesicular rash covering her entire body. Comorbidities include hypertension, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Patient was on methotrexate 12.5 mg and was not receiving any corticosteroids, anti-TNF therapy, or other biological agents. The patient was afebrile (98F) with no SIRS criteria. Multiple vesicular lesions were present covering patient’s entire body including face. Lesions were in different stages, some umbilicated with diameter of 2-7cm. Many lesions have a rim of erythema with no discharge. On admission, patient was also pancytopenic with leukocyte count of 1.70k/mm(3). Biopsies of lesions were performed, which were positive for Varicella antigen. Subsequently, patient was started on Acyclovir. The patient’s clinical status improved and rash resolved. Our patient presented with “atypical” clinical picture of disseminated cutaneous zoster with no obvious dermatome involvement. Disseminated zoster is a potentially serious infection that can have an atypical presentation in patients with immunocompromised status. High index of suspicion is needed to make the diagnosis promptly and to initiate therapy to decrease mortality and morbidity.

PDF

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609790/pdf/CRIM2015-124840.pdf

April 9, 2017 at 7:29 pm

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