Posts filed under ‘Infecciones en seniles’

Sexually transmitted infections in older populations

Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases. 26(1):80-85, February 2013.

Poynten, I. Mary; Grulich, Andrew E.; Templeton, David J.

Purpose of review

People are living longer and healthier lives. In recent years, there has been a focus on recognition of ongoing sexual activity among older adults and leading from this, the potential for an increase in diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Data on STI rates, sexual behaviour and factors affecting susceptibility to STIs are discussed.

Recent findings

There is limited published literature in this field and few recent longitudinal studies of STI acquisition in people older than 50 years. Although there is evidence of an increase in incidence, STIs remain rare in older compared with younger populations. Compared with their heterosexual counterparts, older men who have sex with men are at higher risk of incident HIV and some other STIs. The HIV epidemic is ageing as a result of increasing life span and acquisition of HIV at older ages. Improved longevity, evolving societal norms and physiological changes may place older people at risk of HIV and other STIs.

Summary

Routine STI screening is not warranted in all older people. Education and prevention strategies for all people at greater risk of HIV, regardless of age are required. Age-appropriate interventions designed to impart knowledge and provide the requisite skills needed to reduce STI risk in older age would be beneficial.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/co-infectiousdiseases/Fulltext/2013/02000/Sexually_transmitted_infections_in_older.12.aspx?WT.mc_id=HPxADx20100319xMP

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June 30, 2018 at 10:49 am

Is it safe to go back into the water? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the risk of acquiring infections from recreational exposure to seawater

International Journal of Epidemiology February 26, 2018

Anne F C Leonard  Andrew Singer  Obioha C Ukoumunne  William H Gaze  Ruth Garside

Abstract

Background

Numerous illnesses are associated with bathing in natural waters, although it is assumed that the risk of illness among bathers exposed to relatively clean waters found in high-income countries is negligible. A systematic review was carried out to quantify the increased risk of experiencing a range of adverse health outcomes among bathers exposed to coastal water compared with non-bathers.

Methods

In all 6919 potentially relevant titles and abstracts were screened, and from these 40 studies were eligible for inclusion in the review. Odds ratios (OR) were extracted from 19 of these reports and combined in random-effect meta-analyses for the following adverse health outcomes: incident cases of any illness, ear infections, gastrointestinal illness and infections caused by specific microorganisms.

Results

There is an increased risk of experiencing symptoms of any illness [OR = 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.31 to 2.64, P = 0.001] and ear ailments (OR = 2.05, 95% CI: 1.49 to 2.82, P < 0.001) in bathers compared with non-bathers. There is also an increased risk of experiencing gastrointestinal ailments (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.12 to 1.49, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

This is the first systematic review to evaluate evidence on the increased risk of acquiring illnesses from bathing in seawater compared with non-bathers. Our results support the notion that infections are acquired from bathing in coastal waters, and that bathers have a greater risk of experiencing a variety of illnesses compared with non-bathers.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/ije/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ije/dyx281/4911079

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March 23, 2018 at 7:55 am

A systems biology approach to the effect of aging, immunosenescence and vaccine response.

Current Opinion in Immunology August 2014 V.29 P.62-8.

Poland GA1, Ovsyannikova IG2, Kennedy RB2, Lambert ND2, Kirkland JL3.

Author information

1 Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: poland.gregory@mayo.edu.

2 Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

3 Robert & Arlene Kogod Center on Aging, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

Aging can lead to immunosenescence, which dramatically impairs the hosts’ ability to develop protective immune responses to vaccine antigens. Reasons for this are not well understood.

This topic’s importance is reflected in the increases in morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases among elderly persons, a population growing in size globally, and the significantly lower adaptive immune responses generated to vaccines in this population.

Here, we endeavor to summarize the existing data on the genetic and immunologic correlates of immunosenescence with respect to vaccine response.

We cover how the application of systems biology can advance our understanding of vaccine immunosenescence, with a view toward how such information could lead to strategies to overcome the lower immunogenicity of vaccines in the elderly.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4119552/pdf/nihms589246.pdf

February 19, 2018 at 9:12 am

The microbiota and microbiome in aging: potential implications in health and age-related diseases.

J Am Geriatr Soc. April 2015 V.63 N.4 P.776-81.

Zapata HJ1, Quagliarello VJ.

Author information

1 Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

Advances in bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing allow for characterization of the human commensal bacterial community (microbiota) and its corresponding genome (microbiome).

Surveys of healthy adults reveal that a signature composite of bacteria characterizes each unique body habitat (e.g., gut, skin, oral cavity, vagina).

A myriad of clinical changes, including a basal proinflammatory state (inflamm-aging), that directly interface with the microbiota of older adults and enhance susceptibility to disease accompany aging.

Studies in older adults demonstrate that the gut microbiota correlates with diet, location of residence (e.g., community dwelling, long-term care settings), and basal level of inflammation.

Links exist between the microbiota and a variety of clinical problems plaguing older adults, including physical frailty, Clostridium difficile colitis, vulvovaginal atrophy, colorectal carcinoma, and atherosclerotic disease.

Manipulation of the microbiota and microbiome of older adults holds promise as an innovative strategy to influence the development of comorbidities associated with aging.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4406803/pdf/nihms-644813.pdf

February 19, 2018 at 9:11 am

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

Reumatol Clin. 2017 Mar 7. 

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Molina Collada J1, Rico Nieto A2, Díaz de Bustamante Ussia M3, Balsa Criado A4.

Author information

1 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: molinacolladajuan@gmail.com.

2 Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

3 Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

4 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

Abstract

We describe a case of septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum, gram-positive bacilli that are usually commensal organisms of skin and mucosal membranes, but are seldom implicated in native septic arthritis. An 84-year-old man with Corynebacterium striatum septic arthritis of his native left knee and no response to conventional antibiotic therapy. Thus, the patient was allowed to take dalbavancin for compassionate use, with an excellent clinical outcome. This case emphasizes de role of Corynebacterium striatum in native joint infections and highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate treatment in improving the clinical outcome.

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

http://www.reumatologiaclinica.org/es/linkresolver/artritis-septica-rodilla-nativa-por/S1699258X17300335/

October 22, 2017 at 12:43 pm

Septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2014 May;52(5):1786-8.

Westblade LF1, Shams F, Duong S, Tariq O, Bulbin A, Klirsfeld D, Zhen W, Sakaria S, Ford BA, Burnham CA, Ginocchio CC.

Author information

1 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York, USA.

Abstract

We report a case of septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum, a rare and unusual cause of septic arthritis of native joints. The isolate was identified by a combination of phenotypic, mass spectrometric, and nucleic acid-based assays and exhibited high-level resistance to most antimicrobials.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3993712/pdf/zjm1786.pdf

October 22, 2017 at 12:41 pm

A spontaneous joint infection with Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Feb;45(2):656-8.

Scholle D1.

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, Legacy Emanuel and Good Samaritan Hospitals, 1015 NW 22nd Ave., Portland, OR 97210, USA. dscholle@fastmail.fm

Abstract

Corynebacterium striatum is a ubiquitous saprophyte with the potential to cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. Until now, spontaneous infection of a natural joint has not been reported. When phenotyping failed, gene sequencing was used to identify the species. The isolate demonstrated high-level resistance to most antibiotics.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1829050/pdf/0827-06.pdf

 

October 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm

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