Posts filed under ‘Infecciones Gin/Obs’

Group B Streptococcus in surgical site and non-invasive bacterial infections worldwide: A systematic review and meta-analysis

International Journal of Infectious Diseases June 2019 V.83 P.116-129

Simon M. Collin, Nandini Shetty, Rebecca Guy, Victoria N. Nyaga, Ann Bull, Michael J. Richards, Tjallie I.I. van der Kooi, Mayke B.G. Koek, Mary De Almeida, Sally A. Roberts, Theresa Lamagni

Highlights

  • This review obtained data on group B Streptococcus infection from 67 countries.
  • Group B Streptococcus is implicated in a small proportion of non-invasive infections.
  • Group B Streptococcus causes 10% of caesarean section invasive surgical infections.

Objectives

The epidemiology of disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) outside pregnancy and the neonatal period is poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to quantify the role of GBS as a cause of surgical site and non-invasive infections at all ages.

Methods

A systematic review (PROSPERO CRD42017068914) and meta-analysis of GBS as a proportion (%) of bacterial isolates from surgical site infection (SSI), skin/soft tissue infection (SSTI), urinary tract infection (UTI), and respiratory tract infection (RTI) was conducted.

Results

Seventy-four studies and data sources were included, covering 67 countries. In orthopaedic surgery, GBS accounted for 0.37% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–1.68%), 0.87% (95% CI 0.33–2.28%), and 1.46% (95% CI 0.49–4.29%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI, respectively. GBS played a more significant role as a cause of post-caesarean section SSI, detected in 2.92% (95% CI 1.51–5.55%), 1.93% (95% CI 0.97–3.81%), and 9.69% (95% CI 6.72–13.8%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI. Of the SSTI isolates, 1.89% (95% CI 1.16–3.05%) were GBS. The prevalence of GBS in community and hospital UTI isolates was 1.61% (1.13–2.30%) and 0.73% (0.43–1.23%), respectively. GBS was uncommonly associated with RTI, accounting for 0.35% (95% CI 0.19–0.63%) of community and 0.27% (95% CI 0.15–0.48%) of hospital RTI isolates.

Conclusions

GBS is implicated in a small proportion of surgical site and non-invasive infections, but a substantial proportion of invasive SSI post-caesarean section.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/pdf

 

 

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June 30, 2019 at 12:21 pm

Antibiotics for operative vaginal delivery –  practice-changing data

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10189 P.2361-2362

COMMENT

Antibiotics for operative vaginal delivery –  practice-changing data

The large randomised controlled trial on the effect of antibiotics to prevent infection after operative vaginal delivery by Marian Knight and colleagues1 in The Lancet is practice changing. Operative vaginal deliveries include either vacuum or forceps, and are used in about 2–15% of births.2 Even if one conservatively estimates 2% of babies are born by operative vaginal delivery globally, about 2 700 000 of the world’s 135 million annual births are operative vaginal deliveries. Up to 16% of these births can be associated with infection without antibiotics prophylaxis,3 representing about 432 000 annual infections associated with operative vaginal delivery worldwide……

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30845-1/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930845-1

 

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10189 P.2395-2403

ARTICLES

Prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infection after operative vaginal delivery (ANODE): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

Background

Risk factors for maternal infection are clearly recognised, including caesarean section and operative vaginal birth. Antibiotic prophylaxis at caesarean section is widely recommended because there is clear systematic review evidence that it reduces incidence of maternal infection. Current WHO guidelines do not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis for women undergoing operative vaginal birth because of insufficient evidence of effectiveness. We aimed to investigate whether antibiotic prophylaxis prevented maternal infection after operative vaginal birth.

Methods

In a blinded, randomised controlled trial done at 27 UK obstetric units, women (aged ≥16 years) were allocated to receive a single dose of intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid or placebo (saline) following operative vaginal birth at 36 weeks gestation or later. The primary outcome was confirmed or suspected maternal infection within 6 weeks of delivery defined by a new prescription of antibiotics for specific indications, confirmed systemic infection on culture, or endometritis. We did an intention-to-treat analysis. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number 11166984, and is closed to accrual.

Findings

Between March 13, 2016, and June 13, 2018, 3427 women were randomly assigned to treatment: 1719 to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, and 1708 to placebo. Seven women withdrew, leaving 1715 in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid group and 1705 in the placebo groups. Primary outcome data were missing for 195 (6%) women. Significantly fewer women allocated to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid had a confirmed or suspected infection (180 [11%] of 1619) than women allocated to placebo (306 [19%] of 1606; risk ratio 0·58, 95% CI 0·49–0·69; p<0·0001). One woman in the placebo group reported a skin rash and two women in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid reported other allergic reactions, one of which was reported as a serious adverse event. Two other serious adverse events were reported, neither was considered causally related to the treatment.

Interpretation

This trial shows benefit of a single dose of prophylactic antibiotic after operative vaginal birth and guidance from WHO and other national organisations should be changed to reflect this.

Funding

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30773-1/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930773-1

June 14, 2019 at 3:54 pm

The projected timeframe until cervical cancer elimination in Australia: a modelling study

The Lancet Public Health October 20, 2018

Michaela T Hall, MMath Kate T Simms, PhDJie-Bin Lew, PhDMegan A Smith, PhDJulia ML Brotherton, PhDMarion Saville, MBChB et al.

Background

In 2007, Australia was one of the first countries to introduce a national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme, and it has since achieved high vaccination coverage across both sexes. In December, 2017, organised cervical screening in Australia transitioned from cytology-based screening every 2 years for women aged from 18–20 years to 69 years, to primary HPV testing every 5 years for women aged 25–69 years and exit testing for women aged 70–74 years. We aimed to identify the earliest years in which the annual age-standardised incidence of cervical cancer in Australia (which is currently seven cases per 100 000 women) could decrease below two annual thresholds that could be considered to be potential elimination thresholds: a rare cancer threshold (six new cases per 100 000 women) or a lower threshold (four new cases per 100 000 women), since Australia is likely to be one of the first countries to reach these benchmarks.

Methods

In this modelling study, we used Policy1-Cervix—an extensively validated dynamic model of HPV vaccination, natural history, and cervical screening—to estimate the age-standardised incidence of cervical cancer in Australia from 2015 to 2100. We incorporated age-specific coverage of the Australian National HPV Vaccination Program in girls, including the catch-up programme, and the inclusion of boys into the vaccine programme from 2013, and a change from the quadrivalent to the nonavalent vaccine from 2018. We also modelled the effects of the transition to primary HPV screening. We considered two scenarios for future screening recommendations regarding the cohorts who will be and who have been offered the nonavalent vaccine: either that HPV screening every 5 years continues, or that no screening would be offered to these women.

Findings

We estimate that, in Australia, the age-standardised annual incidence of cervical cancer will decrease to fewer than six new cases per 100 000 women by 2020 (range 2018–22), and to fewer than four new cases per 100 000 women by 2028 (2021–35). The precise year of attaining these rates is dependent on the population used for age-standardisation, HPV screening behaviour and test characteristics, the incremental effects of vaccination of men on herd immunity in women, and assumptions about the future frequency of benign hysterectomies. By 2066 (2054–77), the annual incidence of cervical cancer will decrease and remain at fewer than one case per 100 000 women if screening for HPV every 5 years continues for cohorts who have been offered the nonavalent vaccine, or fewer than three cases per 100 000 women if these cohorts are not screened. Cervical cancer mortality is estimated to decrease to less than an age-standardised annual rate of one death per 100 000 women by 2034 (2025–47), even if future screening is only offered to older cohorts that were not offered the nonavalent vaccine.

Interpretation

If high-coverage vaccination and screening is maintained, at an elimination threshold of four new cases per 100 000 women annually, cervical cancer could be considered to be eliminated as a public health problem in Australia within the next 20 years. However, screening and vaccination initiatives would need to be maintained thereafter to maintain very low cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates.

Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia).

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpub/article/PIIS2468-2667(18)30183-X/fulltext

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S2468-2667%2818%2930183-X

October 4, 2018 at 7:24 am

Diagnostic Performance of a Molecular Test versus Clinician Assessment of Vaginitis

Clin. Microbiol. June 2018 56:13 e00252-18

Jane R. Schwebke, Charlotte A. Gaydos, Paul Nyirjesy, Sonia Paradis, Salma Kodsi, and Charles K. Cooper

Vaginitis is a common complaint, diagnosed either empirically or using Amsel’s criteria and wet mount microscopy. This study sought to determine characteristics of an investigational test (a molecular test for vaginitis), compared to reference, for detection of bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis. Vaginal specimens from a cross-sectional study were obtained from 1,740 women (≥18 years old), with vaginitis symptoms, during routine clinic visits (across 10 sites in the United States).

Specimens were analyzed using a commercial PCR/fluorogenic probe-based investigational test that detects bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis. Clinician diagnosis and in-clinic testing (Amsel’s test, potassium hydroxide preparation, and wet mount) were also employed to detect the three vaginitis causes.

All testing methods were compared to the respective reference methods (Nugent Gram stain for bacterial vaginosis, detection of the Candida gene its2, and Trichomonas vaginalis culture). The investigational test, clinician diagnosis, and in-clinic testing were compared to reference methods for bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis.

The investigational test resulted in significantly higher sensitivity and negative predictive value than clinician diagnosis or in-clinic testing. In addition, the investigational test showed a statistically higher overall percent agreement with each of the three reference methods than did clinician diagnosis or in-clinic testing.

The investigational test showed significantly higher sensitivity for detecting vaginitis, involving more than one cause, than did clinician diagnosis. Taken together, these results suggest that a molecular investigational test can facilitate accurate detection of vaginitis.

abstract

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/6/e00252-18.abstract

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/6/e00252-18.full.pdf+html

June 12, 2018 at 7:34 am

Diagnostic Performance of a Molecular Test versus Clinician Assessment of Vaginitis

Journal of Clinical Microbiology June 2018 V.56 N.6

Jane R. Schwebke, Charlotte A. Gaydos, Paul Nyirjesy, Sonia Paradis, Salma Kodsi and Charles K. Cooper

a University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA

b Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

c Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

d Becton, Dickinson and Company, BD Life Sciences—Diagnostic Systems, Quebec, QC, Canada

e Becton, Dickinson and Company, BD Life Sciences—Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, Maryland, USA

Vaginitis is a common complaint, diagnosed either empirically or using Amsel’s criteria and wet mount microscopy. This study sought to determine characteristics of an investigational test (a molecular test for vaginitis), compared to reference, for detection of bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis. Vaginal specimens from a cross-sectional study were obtained from 1,740 women (≥18 years old), with vaginitis symptoms, during routine clinic visits (across 10 sites in the United States). Specimens were analyzed using a commercial PCR/fluorogenic probe-based investigational test that detects bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis. Clinician diagnosis and in-clinic testing (Amsel’s test, potassium hydroxide preparation, and wet mount) were also employed to detect the three vaginitis causes. All testing methods were compared to the respective reference methods (Nugent Gram stain for bacterial vaginosis, detection of the Candida gene its2, and Trichomonas vaginalis culture). The investigational test, clinician diagnosis, and in-clinic testing were compared to reference methods for bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis. The investigational test resulted in significantly higher sensitivity and negative predictive value than clinician diagnosis or in-clinic testing. In addition, the investigational test showed a statistically higher overall percent agreement with each of the three reference methods than did clinician diagnosis or in-clinic testing. The investigational test showed significantly higher sensitivity for detecting vaginitis, involving more than one cause, than did clinician diagnosis. Taken together, these results suggest that a molecular investigational test can facilitate accurate detection of vaginitis.

abstract

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/6/e00252-18.abstract?etoc

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/6/e00252-18.full.pdf+html

May 28, 2018 at 9:29 am

The Brief Case: Disseminated Neisseria gonorrhoeae in an 18-Year-Old Female

Journal of Clinical Microbiology April 2018 V.56  N.4

Julianne E. Burns and Erin H. Graf

CASE

An 18-year-old previously healthy female presented to a Philadelphia, PA, pediatric emergency department in February for further evaluation of polyarticular arthritis. Two weeks prior, she had presented to an outside hospital with body aches and onset of acute pain in the left arm and leg. The etiology was thought to be cervical radiculopathy, and she was discharged on naproxen and prednisone. She returned to the outside hospital 5 days later without improvement and now with pain and swelling in her left knee, right thumb, right wrist, and bilateral ankles. She had a markedly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 80 mm/h (reference range, 0 to 20 mm/h) and C-reactive protein (CRP) of 76.6 mg/dl (reference range, 0 to 0.9 mg/dl). A workup for autoimmune disease included negative results for antinuclear antibody, rheumatoid factor, and anticyclic citrullinated peptide. Serologic testing for Lyme disease was also negative……

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/4/e00932-17.full.pdf+html

 

 

Closing the Brief Case: Disseminated Neisseria gonorrhoeae in an 18-Year-Old Female

SELF ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

Which of the following specimens is recommended and FDA cleared for nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) in suspected cases of disseminated Neisseria gonorrhoeae?

a-Whole blood

b-Urine

c-Synovial fluid

d.Serum

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/4/e00933-17.full.pdf+html

March 27, 2018 at 8:21 am

Maternal colonization or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis

International Journal of Infectious Diseases November 2017 V.64 N. P.58–66

Andre N.H. Bulabula, Angela Dramowski, Shaheen Mehtar

Highlights

  • The prevalence of colonization with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) in pregnant and/or post-partum women in Africa is 17% (95% confidence interval 10–23%).
  • The pooled proportions from reviewed studies suggest a greater proportion of ESBL-E colonization in pregnant women compared to post-partum women.
  • The rate of maternal colonization with ESBL-E is greater in community settings than in hospital settings.
  • The most frequently reported ESBL-encoding gene in Africa is CTX-M.

Objective

To summarize published studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for maternal bacterial colonization and/or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) in pregnant and/or post-partum women in Africa.

Methods

A systematic review was conducted using the PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Bibliographies of included eligible studies were manually searched to identify additional relevant articles. No language restriction was applied. The timeframe of the search included all records from electronic database inception to July 15, 2017. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed to summarize the prevalence and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) of ESBL-E colonization or infection in pregnant or post-partum women in Africa. The meta-analysis was conducted using STATA IC 13.1 software and the metaprop function/plugin.

Results

Ten studies (seven on pregnant women and three on post-partum women) were included, documenting a 17% prevalence of maternal colonization with ESBL-E in Africa (95% CI 10–23%). The prevalence of ESBL-E in community isolates exceeded that in isolates from the hospital setting (22% vs. 14%). The most frequently reported ESBL-encoding gene was CTX-M (cefotaxime hydrolyzing capabilities). Data on risk factors for maternal ESBL-E colonization and infection are very limited.

Conclusions

The prevalence of colonization and/or infection with ESBL-E in pregnant and post-partum women in Africa exceeds that reported from high- and middle-income settings, representing a risk for subsequent neonatal colonization and/or infection with ESBL-E.

abstract

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30221-7/fulltext

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30221-7/pdf

February 9, 2018 at 1:21 pm

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