Posts filed under ‘Infecciones parasitarias’

Symptomatic Acute Toxoplasmosis in Returning Travelers

Open Forum Infectious Diseases, April 2018 V.5 N.4

Andrés F Henao-Martínez; Carlos Franco-Paredes; Alan G Palestine; Jose G Montoya

We report a family who acquired acute toxoplasmosis after a trip to Central America. One member developed severe clinical manifestations including bilateral chorioretinitis, hepatitis, and myocarditis requiring therapy. Symptomatic acute toxoplasmosis is unusual and possesses a diagnostic challenge. We discuss the clinical and epidemiological implications, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment plan.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/ofid/article/5/4/ofy058/4925380

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

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September 30, 2018 at 10:51 am

Tickborne Diseases — Confronting a Growing Threat

N Engl J of Medic August 23, 2018

PERSPECTIVE

C.I. Paules and Others

Every spring, public health officials prepare for an upsurge in vectorborne diseases. As mosquito-borne illnesses have notoriously surged in the Americas, the U.S. incidence of tickborne infections has risen insidiously, triggering heightened attention from clinicians and researchers …

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1807870?query=infectious-disease

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1807870

September 4, 2018 at 8:34 am

A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2018 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society for Microbiology

Clinical Infectious Diseases September 15, 2018 V.67 N.6 P.813–816

IDSA GUIDELINE

J Michael Miller; Matthew J Binnicker; Sheldon Campbell; Karen C Carroll; Kimberle C Chapin …

The critical nature of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician/advanced practice provider and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the healthcare team.

This document, developed by experts in laboratory and adult and pediatric clinical medicine, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions.

This document presents a system-based approach rather than specimen-based approach, and includes bloodstream and cardiovascular system infections, central nervous system infections, ocular infections, soft tissue infections of the head and neck, upper and lower respiratory infections, infections of the gastrointestinal tract, intra-abdominal infections, bone and joint infections, urinary tract infections, genital infections, and other skin and soft tissue infections; or into etiologic agent groups, including arthropod-borne infections, viral syndromes, and blood and tissue parasite infections.

Each section contains introductory concepts, a summary of key points, and detailed tables that list suspected agents; the most reliable tests to order; the samples (and volumes) to collect in order of preference; specimen transport devices, procedures, times, and temperatures; and detailed notes on specific issues regarding the test methods, such as when tests are likely to require a specialized laboratory or have prolonged turnaround times.

In addition, the pediatric needs of specimen management are also emphasized. There is intentional redundancy among the tables and sections, as many agents and assay choices overlap.

The document is intended to serve as a guidance for physicians in choosing tests that will aid them to quickly and accurately diagnose infectious diseases in their patients.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/67/6/813/5088024

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

September 2, 2018 at 10:40 am

Improving Plasmodium vivax malaria treatment: a little more chloroquine

LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASES September 2018 V.18 N.9 P.934-935

COMMENT

The efficacy of first-line malaria treatment underpins the success of malaria control programmes. Left untreated, malaria infections will generally recur over many months. These recurrences increase malaria morbidity and enhance transmission. Crucially, suboptimal parasite clearance promotes the emergence of drug resistance. Thus, treatment should aim at total parasite elimination. Defining optimal dose, and monitoring for efficacy, rely on findings from clinical trials done in endemic areas. Patients, although monitored over 4 weeks or longer (depending on the drugs’ pharmacokinetics), are usually discharged within days as symptoms wane and parasites become undetectable microscopically. Drug efficacy, or indeed indication of resistance, are deduced from the occurrence, timing, and frequency of recurrent episodes during follow-up…

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(18)30413-4/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2818%2930413-4

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LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASES September 2018 V.18 N.9 P.1025-1034

ARTICLE

The effect of chloroquine dose and primaquine on Plasmodium vivax recurrence: a WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network systematic review and individual patient pooled meta-analysis

Robert J Commons, FRACPProf Julie A Simpson, PhDKamala Thriemer, PhDGeorgina S Humphreys, PhDTesfay Abreha, MPHSisay G Alemu, MScArletta Añez, PhDProf Nicholas M Anstey, PhDGhulam R Awab, PhD …

Background

Chloroquine remains the mainstay of treatment for Plasmodium vivax malaria despite increasing reports of treatment failure. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effect of chloroquine dose and the addition of primaquine on the risk of recurrent vivax malaria across different settings.

Methods

A systematic review done in MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews identified P vivax clinical trials published between Jan 1, 2000, and March 22, 2017. Principal investigators were invited to share individual patient data, which were pooled using standardised methods. Cox regression analyses with random effects for study site were used to investigate the roles of chloroquine dose and primaquine use on rate of recurrence between day 7 and day 42 (primary outcome). The review protocol is registered in PROSPERO, number CRD42016053310.

Findings

Of 134 identified chloroquine studies, 37 studies (from 17 countries) and 5240 patients were included. 2990 patients were treated with chloroquine alone, of whom 1041 (34·8%) received a dose below the target 25 mg/kg. The risk of recurrence was 32·4% (95% CI 29·8–35·1) by day 42. After controlling for confounders, a 5 mg/kg higher chloroquine dose reduced the rate of recurrence overall (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0·82, 95% CI 0·69–0·97; p=0·021) and in children younger than 5 years (0·59, 0·41–0·86; p=0·0058). Adding primaquine reduced the risk of recurrence to 4·9% (95% CI 3·1–7·7) by day 42, which is lower than with chloroquine alone (AHR 0·10, 0·05–0·17; p<0·0001).

Interpretation

Chloroquine is commonly under-dosed in the treatment of vivax malaria. Increasing the recommended dose to 30 mg/kg in children younger than 5 years could reduce substantially the risk of early recurrence when primaquine is not given. Radical cure with primaquine was highly effective in preventing early recurrence and may also improve blood schizontocidal efficacy against chloroquine-resistant P vivax.

Funding

Wellcome Trust, Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(18)30348-7/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2818%2930348-7

August 25, 2018 at 11:17 am

Shotgun Metagenomic Detection of Pathogens: a Micro-Comic Strip

Journal of Clinical Microbiology  August 2018 V.56 N.8

Editorial

Alexander J. McAdam

Next-generation sequencing has made shotgun metagenomic testing of primary clinical specimens for detection of pathogens feasible (1).

These technologies can routinely detect a range of pathogens (bacterial, viral, fungal, and eukaryotic parasites), allowing for hypothesis-free testing, in which test selection does not depend on knowing what pathogens are likely to be present.

Such testing has been applied for detecting infections or colonization of the nervous system (2–4), gastrointestinal tract (5, 6), prosthetic joints (7, 8), and blood or serum (9, 10).

Shotgun metagenomic testing for pathogens is now available for patient testing at a small number of academic and commercial laboratories, and it is expensive compared to other microbiology tests.

Where do the cost of and diversity of pathogens detected by shotgun metagenomic testing fit into the range of available microbiology tests?

FULL TEXT

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/8/e00799-18?etoc

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/8/e00799-18.full.pdf+html

July 28, 2018 at 6:32 pm

Scabies outbreaks in ten care homes for elderly people: a prospective study of clinical features, epidemiology, and treatment outcomes

LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASES August 2018 V.18 N.8 P.894–902

Background

Scabies outbreaks in residential and nursing care homes for elderly people are common, subject to diagnostic delay, and hard to control. We studied clinical features, epidemiology, and outcomes of outbreaks in the UK between 2014 and 2015.

Methods

We did a prospective observational study in residential care homes for elderly people in southeast England that reported scabies outbreaks to Public Health England health protection teams. An outbreak was defined as two or more cases of scabies (in either residents or staff) at a single care home. All patients who provided informed consent were included; patients with dementia were included if a personal or nominated consultee (ie, a family member or nominated staff member) endorsed participation. Dermatology-trained physicians examined residents at initial clinical visits, which were followed by two mass treatments with topical scabicide as per local health protection team guidance. Follow-up clinical visits were held 6 weeks after initial visits. Scabies was diagnosed through pre-defined case definitions as definite, probable, or possible with dermatoscopy and microscopy as appropriate.

Findings

230 residents were examined in ten outbreaks between Jan 23, 2014, and April 13, 2015. Median age was 86·9 years (IQR 81·5–92·3), 174 (76%) were female, and 157 (68%) had dementia. 61 (27%) residents were diagnosed with definite, probable, or possible scabies, of whom three had crusted scabies. Physical signs differed substantially from classic presentations. 31 (51%) of the 61 people diagnosed with scabies were asymptomatic, and only 25 (41%) had burrows. Mites were visualised with dermatoscopy in seven (11%) patients, and further confirmed by microscopy in three (5%). 35 (57%) cases had signs of scabies only on areas of the body that would normally be covered. Dementia was the only risk factor for a scabies diagnosis that we identified (odds ratio 2·37 [95% CI 1·38–4·07]). At clinical follow-up, 50 people who were initially diagnosed with scabies were examined. No new cases of scabies were detected, but infestation persisted in ten people.

Interpretation

Clinical presentation of scabies in elderly residents of care homes differs from classic descriptions familiar to clinicians. This difference probably contributes to delayed recognition and suboptimal management in this vulnerable group. Dermatoscopy and microscopy were of little value. Health-care workers should be aware of the different presentation of scabies in elderly people, and should do thorough examinations, particularly in people with dementia.

Funding

Public Health England and British Skin Foundation.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(18)30347-5/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/laninf/PIIS1473-3099(18)30347-5.pdf

July 26, 2018 at 12:40 pm

Diagnostic Performance of a Molecular Test versus Clinician Assessment of Vaginitis

Clin. Microbiol. June 2018 56:13 e00252-18

Jane R. Schwebke, Charlotte A. Gaydos, Paul Nyirjesy, Sonia Paradis, Salma Kodsi, and Charles K. Cooper

Vaginitis is a common complaint, diagnosed either empirically or using Amsel’s criteria and wet mount microscopy. This study sought to determine characteristics of an investigational test (a molecular test for vaginitis), compared to reference, for detection of bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis. Vaginal specimens from a cross-sectional study were obtained from 1,740 women (≥18 years old), with vaginitis symptoms, during routine clinic visits (across 10 sites in the United States).

Specimens were analyzed using a commercial PCR/fluorogenic probe-based investigational test that detects bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis. Clinician diagnosis and in-clinic testing (Amsel’s test, potassium hydroxide preparation, and wet mount) were also employed to detect the three vaginitis causes.

All testing methods were compared to the respective reference methods (Nugent Gram stain for bacterial vaginosis, detection of the Candida gene its2, and Trichomonas vaginalis culture). The investigational test, clinician diagnosis, and in-clinic testing were compared to reference methods for bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp., and Trichomonas vaginalis.

The investigational test resulted in significantly higher sensitivity and negative predictive value than clinician diagnosis or in-clinic testing. In addition, the investigational test showed a statistically higher overall percent agreement with each of the three reference methods than did clinician diagnosis or in-clinic testing.

The investigational test showed significantly higher sensitivity for detecting vaginitis, involving more than one cause, than did clinician diagnosis. Taken together, these results suggest that a molecular investigational test can facilitate accurate detection of vaginitis.

abstract

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/6/e00252-18.abstract

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/56/6/e00252-18.full.pdf+html

June 12, 2018 at 7:34 am

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