Posts filed under ‘Infecciones parasitarias’

A Rose by Any Other Name: Practical Updates on Microbial Nomenclature for Clinical Microbiology

Journal of Clinical Microbiology January 2017 V.55 N.1 P.3-4

EDITORIAL

Colleen S. Kraft, Alexander J. McAdam, and Karen C. Carroll

aDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

bDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

cDivision of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

The clinical microbiology laboratory stands at the interface between basic science, including the study of phylogeny, and applications of science in the very practical world of medical care.

In this context, it is important that laboratory reports balance scientific accuracy with medical utility, and it is particularly difficult to do this in the naming of microorganisms.

New organisms are discovered and named, and our understanding of the relationships between known organisms improves, resulting in the reclassification and renaming of organisms as they are sorted into the correct groups.

In this issue of Journal of Clinical Microbiology, we are pleased to provide several minireviews that are intended to help clinical microbiologists keep up-to-date with changes in nomenclature for bacteria (1), parasites (2), viruses (3), and fungi (4).

Most of these minireviews focus on human pathogens, but the minireview on viruses includes those affecting nonhuman animals. An article about mycobacterial nomenclature is in preparation and will be published in Journal of Clinical Microbiology when available.

The idea for this informative resource was proposed by Dr. Karen Carroll at the editors’ meeting in 2015.

The editors enthusiastically agreed these reviews would be a useful resource for clinical microbiologists, infectious diseases physicians, laboratory technologists, pharmacists, and infection preventionists, in addition to fostering discussion and teaching of trainees and students.

Several editors volunteered to write the articles, and we plan to update these minireviews every 2 years if they prove to be as useful as we expect….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/1/3.full.pdf+html

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October 19, 2017 at 3:02 pm

False-Positive Rapid Malaria Antigen Test Result in a Returned Traveler

Journal of Clinical Microbiology August 2017 V.55 N.8 P.2294-2297

The Brief Case

Kristle L. Haberichter, Paul C. Johnson, Paul J. Chittick, Peter Millward, Barbara Robinson-Dunn, and Bobby L. Boyanton Jr.

A previously healthy 43-year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a 13-day history of recurrent nightly fevers (100°F to 101°F), nonproductive cough, and respiratory congestion. She was prescribed azithromycin, albuterol, and benzonatate. She presented to the emergency center 2 days later without improvement and at that time reported night sweats. She had recently traveled to Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and the United Arab Emirates. The nightly fevers began 11 days after returning home. She acknowledged being bitten by mosquitoes throughout her travels and did not take malaria prophylaxis.

A previously healthy 43-year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a 13-day history of recurrent nightly fevers (100°F to 101°F), nonproductive cough, and respiratory congestion. She was prescribed azithromycin, albuterol, and benzonatate. She presented to the emergency center 2 days later without improvement and at that time reported night sweats. She had recently traveled to Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and the United Arab Emirates. The nightly fevers began 11 days after returning home. She acknowledged being bitten by mosquitoes throughout her travels and did not take malaria prophylaxis….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/8/2294.full.pdf+html

 

 

Journal of Clinical Microbiology August 2017 V.55 N.8 P.2560-2561

Closing the Brief Case: False-Positive Rapid Malaria Antigen Test Result in a Returned Traveler

Kristle L. Haberichter, Paul C. Johnson, Paul J. Chittick, Peter Millward, Barbara Robinson-Dunn, and Bobby L. Boyanton Jr.

aDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA

bDepartment of Infectious Disease, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA

cOakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, Michigan, USA

ANSWERS TO SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/8/2560.full.pdf+html

July 26, 2017 at 9:23 am

Sexual transmission of American trypanosomiasis in humans: a new potential pandemic route for Chagas parasites

Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz June 2017 V.112 N.6

Perla F Araujo1, Adriana B Almeida1, Carlos F Pimentel1, Adriano R Silva1, Alessandro Sousa1, Sebastião A Valente2,

Vera C Valente2, Manuela M Britto1, Ana C Rosa1, Rozeneide M Alves1, Luciana Hagström1, Antonio RL Teixeira1  *  +

1Universidade de Brasília, Faculdade de Medicina, Laboratório Multidisciplinar de Pesquisa em Doença de Chagas, Brasília, DF, Brasil

2Instituto Evandro Chagas, Belém, PA, Brasil

BACKGROUND

The Trypanosoma cruzi infection endemic in Latin America has now spread to several countries across four continents; this endemic involves triatomine vector-free protists. We hypothesised that the sexual transmission of T. cruzi contributes to the ongoing spread of Chagas disease.

OBJECTIVES

A short-term longitudinal study was conducted to evaluate this hypothesis.

METHODS

The study population comprised 109 subjects from four families, among whom 21 had been diagnosed with acute Chagas disease by direct parasitological analysis. Blood mononuclear cells and serum samples were obtained from each study subject once per year for three consecutive years. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence serological examinations were used to detect specific T. cruzi antibodies. Polymerase chain reaction of T. cruzi DNA revealed 188-nucleotide bands, which hybridised to a specific radiolabelled probe and were confirmed by cloning and sequencing.

RESULTS

Three independent assessments at different time points revealed T. cruzi nuclear DNA footprints in 76% (83/109) of the study population with active infection. In contrast, the ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assays detected the T. cruzi antibody in 28.4% (31/109) of the study samples. Moreover, the semen from 82.6% (19/23) of subjects people revealed harboured the 188- bp base pair T. cruzi footprint. Interestingly, the ejaculates of nuclear DNA-positive Chagas patient transmitted the T. cruzi upon peritoneal injection or infusion in the vagina of mice, and amastigotes were detected in the skeletal muscle, myocardium, vas deferens, and uterine tube.

MAIN CONCLUSIONS

T. cruzi infections can be transmitted from females or males to naïve mates through intercourse, and progeny showed discrepancies between the ratios of nuclear DNA footprints and specific antibody that can be explained by the tolerance attained during early embryo growth. Additional studies are needed to develop drugs to eradicate the infections. Additionally, the importance of a vigorous education, information, and communication program to prevent sexually transmitted Chagas disease in humans cannot be underemphasised.

PDF

http://www.scielo.br/pdf/mioc/v112n6/0074-0276-mioc-112-6-0437.pdf

July 14, 2017 at 8:23 am

Abordaje terapéutico actual de la malaria grave importada

Revista Española de Quimioterapia Septiembre 2016 V.29 Supl.1

EMMANUELE VENANZI, ROGELIO LÓPEZ-VÉLEZ

PDF

http://www.seq.es/seq/0214-3429/29/sup1/15venanzi.pdf

 

Resistencia a los antimaláricos

EMMANUELE VENANZI, ROGELIO LÓPEZ-VÉLEZ

PDF

http://www.seq.es/seq/0214-3429/29/sup1/16venanzi.pdf

 

April 9, 2017 at 12:44 pm

A New Development in Trypanosoma cruzi Detection

Journal of Clinical Microbiology March 2017 V.55 N.3 P.690-692

Herbert B. Tanowitz and Louis M. Weiss

Department of Pathology, Division of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, and Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA

Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in areas of Latin America where Chagas disease is endemic and among infected individuals who have migrated to nonendemic areas of North America and Europe.

There are many diagnostic tests that are employed in the serological diagnosis of this infection. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Bautista-López et al. provide characterization of excretory vesicles (EVs) from Vero cells infected with T. cruzi and provide data on the EVs produced by trypomastigotes and amastigotes (N. L. Bautista-López et al., J Clin Microbiol 55:744–758, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01649-16).

Their proteomic study defines potential targets to evaluate for improved diagnostic tests, effects on host cell biology that contribute to the pathogenesis of infection, and vaccine candidates. If any of the EV-associated proteins identified were to be correlated to cure of infection, this would be a major advance….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/3/690.full.pdf+html

February 24, 2017 at 8:01 am

Amibas de vida libre en seres humanos

Mónica Liliana Peralta Rodríguez1, Jaime de Jesús Ayala Oviedo1

1 Docentes del área de Morfofisiología. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la Sabana, Bogotá (Colombia).

ayala@unisabana.edu.co

Entre las enfermedades graves, peligrosas y de gran importancia epidemiológica se encuentran la meningitis y la encefalitis, que pueden llevar a invalidez o muerte. Los agentes etiológicos que las producen generalmente son bacterias, virus y hongos. En cuanto a los protozoos causantes de meningitis y encefalitis, se encuentran las amibas de vida libre. Los individuos infectados con estas amibas tienen como antecedente el haber tenido contacto con aguas contaminadas en días recientes, especialmente de piscinas o aguas termales. Naegleria fowleri parasita a individuos aparentemente saludables, niños o óvenes y es la causante de meningoencefalitis amebiana primaria, que se caracteriza por su rápida evolución y luego la muerte. Algunas especies del género Acanthamoeba, Balamuthia mandrillaris, y recientemente Sappinia pedata, producen encefalitis amebiana granulomatosa, que se presenta de forma subaguda o crónica; generalmente parasitan a individuos inmunosuprimidos. Además, ciertas especies de Acanthamoeba producen queratitis, que se confunden con las producidas por Herpes simplex u hongos. Estas amibas también causan infecciones severas en pulmones, oídos, piel y nariz. El diagnóstico de estas amibas en la mayoría de los casos se hace después de la muerte de los individuos infectados. En cuanto a su tratamiento, se han empleado combinaciones de varios antimicrobianos con resultados poco alentadores. Estas amibas no son lo suficientemente conocidas por el personal de salud, por lo tanto, en esta revisión se pretende evidenciar los aspectos más relevantes de éstas, ya que puede haber subdiagnóstico o confusión con otros agentes etiológicos y no sospechar de la presencia de amibas de vida libre.

PDF

http://www.scielo.org.co/pdf/sun/v25n2/v25n2a09.pdf

February 13, 2017 at 8:50 am

The dangerous turn of “brain eating amoeba” in Sindh, Pakistan.

J Infect Public Health. 2015 May-Jun;8(3):305-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jiph.2014.10.003. Epub 2014 Nov 27.

Letter to Editor

Ul Islam MY1, Rahim SA2, Salim A2.

Author information

1Dow Medical College, DUHS, Karachi, Pakistan. Electronic address: yousuf3220@gmail.com

2Dow Medical College, DUHS, Karachi, Pakistan

PDF

http://www.jiph.org/article/S1876-0341(14)00172-5/pdf

February 13, 2017 at 8:49 am

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