Posts filed under ‘Infecciones relacionadas a prótesis’

Highlights From Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America for the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Adults and Children

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice May 2011 V.19 N.3 P.207-20

Clinical Guidelines

File, Thomas M. Jr

Recently, the Infectious Diseases Society published evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

The guideline discusses the management of a variety of infections including skin infections, bacteremia and endocarditis, pneumonia, and osteomyelitis and joint infections.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/infectdis/Fulltext/2011/05000/Highlights_From_Clinical_Practice_Guidelines_by.13.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

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December 7, 2018 at 9:28 am

Managing an Elusive Pathogen: Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in a Variety of Care Settings

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice May 2011 V.19 N.3 P.150-155

NFID Clinical Updates

Poretz, Donald M.; Rehm, Susan J.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections continue to be a major problem both within hospitals (hospital-acquired MRSA) and increasingly in community settings (community-acquired MRSA), leading to well-publicized media reports and, as a result, greater public awareness of this problem.

Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish between a MRSA and a methicillin-sensitive S. aureus skin and soft tissue infection, and this should be taken into consideration when initiating empiric therapy.

There are several oral and intravenous antibiotics available to treat MRSA infections, some of which are inexpensive, whereas others are extremely costly; all have potential adverse effects and possible drug-drug interactions with which the prescriber should be familiar.

Careful monitoring of patients who receive outpatient intravenous antibiotics and an understanding of various intravenous devices and their associated possible complications in addition to knowledge of the economics involved are essential to make cost-effective decisions.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.lww.com/infectdis/Fulltext/2011/05000/Managing_an_Elusive_Pathogen__Treatment_of.2.aspx

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

December 7, 2018 at 9:24 am

Cefazolin Prophylaxis for Total Joint Arthroplasty: Obese Patients Are Frequently Underdosed and at Increased Risk of Periprosthetic Joint Infection

Journal of Arthroplasty November 2018 V.33 N.11 P. 3551–3554

Alexander J. Rondon, Michael M. Kheir, Timothy L. Tan, Noam Shohat, Max R. Greenky, Javad Parvizi

Background

One of the most effective prophylactic strategies against periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is administration of perioperative antibiotics. Many orthopedic surgeons are unaware of the weight-based dosing protocol for cefazolin. This study aimed at elucidating what proportion of patients receiving cefazolin prophylaxis are underdosed and whether this increases the risk of PJI.

Methods

A retrospective study of 17,393 primary total joint arthroplasties receiving cefazolin as perioperative prophylaxis from 2005 to 2017 was performed. Patients were stratified into 2 groups (underdosed and adequately dosed) based on patient weight and antibiotic dosage. Patients who developed PJI within 1 year following index procedure were identified. A bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to control for potential confounders and identify risk factors for PJI.

Results

The majority of patients weighing greater than 120 kg (95.9%, 944/984) were underdosed. Underdosed patients had a higher rate of PJI at 1 year compared with adequately dosed patients (1.51% vs 0.86%, P = .002). Patients weighing greater than 120 kg had higher 1-year PJI rate than patients weighing less than 120 kg (3.25% vs 0.83%, P < .001). Patients who were underdosed (odds ratio, 1.665; P = .006) with greater comorbidities (odds ratio, 1.259; P < .001) were more likely to develop PJI at 1 year.

Conclusion

Cefazolin underdosing is common, especially for patients weighing more than 120 kg. Our study reports that underdosed patients were more likely to develop PJI. Orthopedic surgeons should pay attention to the weight-based dosing of antibiotics in the perioperative period to avoid increasing risk of PJI.

abstract

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(18)30607-7/fulltext

PDF

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(18)30607-7/pdf

November 30, 2018 at 8:28 am

Improving the Diagnosis of Orthopedic Implant-Associated Infections: Optimizing the Use of Tools Already in the Box

Clin. Microbiol. December 2018 V.56 N.12

Shawn Vasoo

With the increasing number of prosthetic joints replaced annually worldwide, orthopedic implant-associated infections (OIAI) present a considerable burden. Accurate diagnostics are required to optimize surgical and antimicrobial therapy. Sonication fluid cultures have been shown in multiple studies to improve the microbiological yield of OIAIs, but uptake of sonication has not been widespread in many routine clinical microbiology laboratories. In this issue, M. Dudareva and colleagues (J Clin Microbiol 56:e00688-18, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00688-18) describe their unit’s experience with OIAI diagnosis using periprosthetic tissue inoculated into an automated blood culture system and sonication fluid culture.

FULL TEXT

https://jcm.asm.org/content/56/12/e01379-18?etoc=

PDF

https://jcm.asm.org/content/jcm/56/12/e01379-18.full.pdf

 

 

Clin. Microbiol. December 2018 V.56 N.12

Sonication versus Tissue Sampling for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint and Other Orthopedic Device-Related Infections

Maria Dudareva, Lucinda Barrett, Mel Figtree, Matthew Scarborough, Masanori Watanabe, Robert Newnham, Rachael Wallis, Sarah Oakley, Ben Kendrick, David Stubbs, Martin A. McNally, Philip Bejon, Bridget A. Atkins, Adrian Taylor and Andrew J. Brent

Current guidelines recommend collection of multiple tissue samples for diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections (PJI). Sonication of explanted devices has been proposed as a potentially simpler alternative; however, reported microbiological yield varies. We evaluated sonication for diagnosis of PJI and other orthopedic device-related infections (DRI) at the Oxford Bone Infection Unit between October 2012 and August 2016. We compared the performance of paired tissue and sonication cultures against a “gold standard” of published clinical and composite clinical and microbiological definitions of infection. We analyzed explanted devices and a median of five tissue specimens from 505 procedures. Among clinically infected cases the sensitivity of tissue and sonication culture was 69% (95% confidence interval, 63 to 75) and 57% (50 to 63), respectively (P < 0.0001). Tissue culture was more sensitive than sonication for both PJI and other DRI, irrespective of the infection definition used. Tissue culture yield was higher for all subgroups except less virulent infections, among which tissue and sonication culture yield were similar. The combined sensitivity of tissue and sonication culture was 76% (70 to 81) and increased with the number of tissue specimens obtained. Tissue culture specificity was 97% (94 to 99), compared with 94% (90 to 97) for sonication (P = 0.052) and 93% (89 to 96) for the two methods combined. Tissue culture is more sensitive and may be more specific than sonication for diagnosis of orthopedic DRI in our setting. Variable methodology and case mix may explain reported differences between centers in the relative yield of tissue and sonication culture. Culture yield was highest for both methods combined.

FULL TEXT

https://jcm.asm.org/content/56/12/e00688-18?etoc=

PDF

https://jcm.asm.org/content/jcm/56/12/e00688-18.full.pdf

November 28, 2018 at 3:12 pm

Understanding the Mechanism of Bacterial Biofilms Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents.

Open Microbiol J. 2017 Apr 28;11:53-62.

Singh S1, Singh SK2, Chowdhury I3, Singh R2.

1 Department of Kriya Sharir, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi- 221 005 UP India.

2 Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.

3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

A biofilm is a group of microorganisms, that causes health problems for the patients with indwelling medical devices via attachment of cells to the surface matrix. It increases the resistance of a microorganism for antimicrobial agents and developed the human infection. Current strategies are removed or prevent the microbial colonies from the medical devices, which are attached to the surfaces. This will improve the clinical outcomes in favor of the patients suffering from serious infectious diseases. Moreover, the identification and inhibition of genes, which have the major role in biofilm formation, could be the effective approach for health care systems. In a current review article, we are highlighting the biofilm matrix and molecular mechanism of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial biofilms.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5427689/pdf/TOMICROJ-11-53.pdf

 

October 14, 2018 at 10:44 am

Biofilms: survival mechanisms of clinically relevant microorganisms.

Clinical Microbiology Reviews April 2002 V.15 N.2 P.167-93.

Donlan RM1, Costerton JW.

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. rld8@cdc.gov

Abstract

Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes involved in cell attachment and biofilm formation.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC118068/pdf/0012.pdf

October 14, 2018 at 10:41 am

Biofilm formation: a clinically relevant microbiological process.

Clinical Infectious Disseases October 15, 2001 V.33 N.8 P.1387-92.

Donlan RM1.

1 Biofilm Laboratory, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. rld8@cdc.gov

Abstract

Microorganisms universally attach to surfaces and produce extracellular polysaccharides, resulting in the formation of a biofilm. Biofilms pose a serious problem for public health because of the increased resistance of biofilm-associated organisms to antimicrobial agents and the potential for these organisms to cause infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. An appreciation of the role of biofilms in infection should enhance the clinical decision-making process.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/33/8/1387/347551

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

 

October 14, 2018 at 10:39 am

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