Posts filed under ‘Infecciones relacionadas a prótesis’

Antimicrobial susceptibility testintg in biofilm-growing bacteria

Clinical Microbiology and Infection October 2014 V.20 N.10 P.981-990

M.D. Macia, E. Rojo-Molinero, A. Oliver

Biofilms are organized bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix attached to living or abiotic surfaces.

The development of biofilms is currently recognized as one of the most relevant drivers of persistent infections. Among them, chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is probably the most intensively studied.

The lack of correlation between conventional susceptibility test results and therapeutic success in chronic infections is probably a consequence of the use of planktonically growing instead of biofilm-growing bacteria.

Therefore, several in vitro models to evaluate antimicrobial activity on biofilms have been implemented over the last decade. Microtitre plate-based assays, the Calgary device, substratum suspending reactors and the flow cell system are some of the most used in vitro biofilm models for susceptibility studies.

Likewise, new pharmacodynamic parameters, including minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration, minimal biofilm-eradication concentration, biofilm bactericidal concentration, and biofilm-prevention concentration, have been defined in recent years to quantify antibiotic activity in biofilms.

Using these parameters, several studies have shown very significant quantitative and qualitative differences for the effects of most antibiotics when acting on planktonic or biofilm bacteria.

Nevertheless, standardization of the procedures, parameters and breakpoints, by official agencies, is needed before they are implemented in clinical microbiology laboratories for routine susceptibility testing.

Research efforts should also be directed to obtaining a deeper understanding of biofilm resistance mechanisms, the evaluation of optimal pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models for biofilm growth, and correlation with clinical outcome.

PDF

http://www.clinicalmicrobiologyandinfection.com/article/S1198-743X(14)65364-7/pdf

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November 15, 2017 at 2:57 pm

Closing the Brief Case: Bacteremia and Vertebral Osteomyelitis Due to Staphylococcus schleiferi

Journal of Clinical Microbiology November 2017 V.55 N.11 P.3309-3310

Melanie L. Yarbrough, Yasir Hamad, Carey-Ann D. Burnham and Ige A. George

aDepartment of Pathology & Immunology, Division of Laboratory and Genomic Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

bDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

ANSWERS TO SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/11/3309.full.pdf+html

October 26, 2017 at 3:29 pm

The Brief Case: Bacteremia and Vertebral Osteomyelitis Due to Staphylococcus schleiferi

Journal of Clinical Microbiology November 2017 V.55 N.11 P.3157-3161

Melanie L. Yarbrough, Yasir Hamad, Carey-Ann D. Burnham and Ige A. George

aDepartment of Pathology & Immunology, Division of Laboratory and Genomic Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

bDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

A 60-year-old female was admitted to a hospital in Missouri with back pain and pathological fractures of multiple thoracic vertebrae. Four months prior to presentation, the patient began experiencing low back pain without inciting trauma. Over the next 2 months, the pain continued to worsen and she experienced a 20-lb weight loss and drenching night sweats, prompting her to seek care. During the initial encounter, the patient denied experiencing fevers. She was not immunocompromised and had no risk factors for tuberculosis and no history of recent travel, hospitalization, or invasive procedures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed abnormal enhancement and edema involving the T6, T7, and T8 vertebral bodies with associated prevertebral and postvertebral soft tissue enhancement and edema. A fluoroscopy-guided T7 vertebral body biopsy revealed acute and chronic osteomyelitis with no evidence of malignancy, prompting an infectious disease consult…

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/11/3157.full.pdf+html

October 26, 2017 at 3:28 pm

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

Reumatol Clin. 2017 Mar 7. 

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Molina Collada J1, Rico Nieto A2, Díaz de Bustamante Ussia M3, Balsa Criado A4.

Author information

1 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: molinacolladajuan@gmail.com.

2 Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

3 Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

4 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

Abstract

We describe a case of septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum, gram-positive bacilli that are usually commensal organisms of skin and mucosal membranes, but are seldom implicated in native septic arthritis. An 84-year-old man with Corynebacterium striatum septic arthritis of his native left knee and no response to conventional antibiotic therapy. Thus, the patient was allowed to take dalbavancin for compassionate use, with an excellent clinical outcome. This case emphasizes de role of Corynebacterium striatum in native joint infections and highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate treatment in improving the clinical outcome.

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

http://www.reumatologiaclinica.org/es/linkresolver/artritis-septica-rodilla-nativa-por/S1699258X17300335/

October 22, 2017 at 12:43 pm

Septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2014 May;52(5):1786-8.

Westblade LF1, Shams F, Duong S, Tariq O, Bulbin A, Klirsfeld D, Zhen W, Sakaria S, Ford BA, Burnham CA, Ginocchio CC.

Author information

1 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York, USA.

Abstract

We report a case of septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum, a rare and unusual cause of septic arthritis of native joints. The isolate was identified by a combination of phenotypic, mass spectrometric, and nucleic acid-based assays and exhibited high-level resistance to most antimicrobials.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3993712/pdf/zjm1786.pdf

October 22, 2017 at 12:41 pm

A spontaneous joint infection with Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Feb;45(2):656-8.

Scholle D1.

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, Legacy Emanuel and Good Samaritan Hospitals, 1015 NW 22nd Ave., Portland, OR 97210, USA. dscholle@fastmail.fm

Abstract

Corynebacterium striatum is a ubiquitous saprophyte with the potential to cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. Until now, spontaneous infection of a natural joint has not been reported. When phenotyping failed, gene sequencing was used to identify the species. The isolate demonstrated high-level resistance to most antibiotics.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1829050/pdf/0827-06.pdf

 

October 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm

Recommendations for prevention of surgical site infection in adult elective arthroplasty.

Medicina (B Aires). 2017;77(2):143-157.

[Article in Spanish]

Chuluyán JC1, Vila A2, Chattás AL3, Montero M3, Pensotti C4, Tosello C5, Sánchez M6, Vera Ocampo C7, Kremer G8, Quirós R8, Benchetrit GA9, Pérez CF10, Terusi AL11, Nacinovich F12.

Author information

1 Grupo de Trabajo Infectología, Hospital General de Agudos Dr. T. álvarez, Argentina. E-mail: jcchulu@gmail.com

2 Servicio de Infectología, Hospital Italiano de Mendoza, Mendoza, Argentina.

3 Hospital General de Agudos Dr. Pirovano, Argentina.

4 Clínica Monte Grande, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

5 Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

6 Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

7 Sanatorio Dupuytren, Argentina.

8 Hospital Universitario Austral, Argentina.

9 Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas A. Lanari, UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

10 Policlínico del Docente-Centro Médico Huésped, Argentina.

11 Instituto César Milstein, Argentina.

12 Instituto Cardiovascular de Buenos Aires, Centros Médicos Dr. Stamboulian, Argentina.

Abstract

Surgical site infections complicating orthopedic implant surgeries prolong hospital stay and increase risk of readmission, hospitalization costs and mortality.

These recommendations are aimed at:

(i) optimizing compliance and incorporating habits in all surgery phases by detecting risk factors for surgical site infections which are potentially correctable or modifiable; and

(ii) optimizing preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis as well as intraoperative and postoperative care.

PDF

http://www.medicinabuenosaires.com/PMID/28463223.pdf

September 25, 2017 at 7:35 am

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