Posts filed under ‘Infecciones respiratorias’

2018 recommendations for the management of community acquired pneumonia.

J Bras Pneumol. September-October 2018 V.;44 N.5 P.405-423.   

Corrêa RA1, Costa AN2, Lundgren F3, Michelin L4, Figueiredo MR5, Holanda M6, Gomes M7, Teixeira PJZ8, Martins R9, Silva R10, Athanazio RA2, Silva RMD11, Pereira MC12.

Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the vast diversity of respiratory microbiota, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most prevalent pathogen among etiologic agents. Despite the significant decrease in the mortality rates for lower respiratory tract infections in recent decades, CAP ranks third as a cause of death in Brazil. Since the latest Guidelines on CAP from the Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia (SBPT, Brazilian Thoracic Association) were published (2009), there have been major advances in the application of imaging tests, in etiologic investigation, in risk stratification at admission and prognostic score stratification, in the use of biomarkers, and in the recommendations for antibiotic therapy (and its duration) and prevention through vaccination. To review these topics, the SBPT Committee on Respiratory Infections summoned 13 members with recognized experience in CAP in Brazil who identified issues relevant to clinical practice that require updates given the publication of new epidemiological and scientific evidence. Twelve topics concerning diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic, and preventive issues were developed. The topics were divided among the authors, who conducted a nonsystematic review of the literature, but giving priority to major publications in the specific areas, including original articles, review articles, and systematic reviews. All authors had the opportunity to review and comment on all questions, producing a single final document that was approved by consensus

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467584/pdf/1806-3713-jbpneu-44-05-00405.pdf

January 18, 2020 at 12:22 pm

Management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults: 2016 guideline update from the Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) and Dutch Association of Chest Physicians (NVALT).

Neth J Med. January 2018 V.76 N.1 P.:4-13.

Wiersinga WJ1, Bonten MJ, Boersma WG, Jonkers RE, Aleva RM, Kullberg BJ, Schouten JA, Degener JE, van de Garde EMW, Verheij TJ, Sachs APE, Prins JM.

Abstract

The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy in collaboration with the Dutch Association of Chest Physicians, the Dutch Society for Intensive Care and the Dutch College of General Practitioners have updated their evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults who present to the hospital. This 2016 update focuses on new data on the aetiological and radiological diagnosis of CAP, severity classification methods, initial antibiotic treatment in patients with severe CAP and the role of adjunctive corticosteroids. Other parts overlap with the 2011 guideline. Apart from the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands (2007-2010) no other shifts in the most common causative agents of CAP or in their resistance patterns were observed in the last five years. Low-dose CT scanning may ultimately replace the conventional chest X-ray; however, at present, there is insufficient evidence to advocate the use of CT scanning as the new standard in patients evaluated for CAP. A pneumococcal urine antigen test is now recommended for all patients presenting with severe CAP; a positive test result can help streamline therapy once clinical stability has been reached and no other pathogens have been detected. Coverage for atypical microorganisms is no longer recommended in empirical treatment of severe CAP in the non-intensive care setting. For these patients (with CURB-65 score >2 or Pneumonia Severity Index score of 5) empirical therapy with a 2nd/3rd generation cephalosporin is recommended, because of the relatively high incidence of Gram-negative bacteria, and to a lesser extent S. aureus. Corticosteroids are not recommended as adjunctive therapy for CAP

PDF

http://www.njmonline.nl/getpdf.php?id=1933

January 18, 2020 at 12:21 pm

REVISION – Tres claves para seleccionar el antibiótico oral adecuado en las infecciones respiratorias

Revista Española de Quimioterapia Diciembre 2019 V.32 N.6 P.497-515

La exacerbación de la enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica y la neumonía adquirida en la comunidad son las infecciones del tracto respiratorio inferior más frecuentes en la práctica clínica diaria.

La selección del antibiótico es un componente crucial en su tratamiento y, en la mayoría de las ocasiones, se realiza de forma empírica.

Las sociedades científicas elaboran recomendaciones terapéuticas basadas en la evidencia científica y/o recomendaciones de expertos que son de gran ayuda para los clínicos.

Los betalactámicos, las fluoroquinolonas y los macrólidos son los fármacos más utilizados por vía oral.

Desde un punto de vista práctico, existen tres claves para la adecuada elección del tratamiento antibiótico oral, que son la efectividad, la seguridad y el impacto ecológico en la microbiota del paciente, incluyendo el desarrollo de resistencias, que van a ser valoradas en profundidad en esta revisión.

PDF

https://seq.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/barberan04dec2019.pdf

December 29, 2019 at 2:24 pm

Baloxavir marboxil for uncomplicated influenza in adults and adolescents.

N Engl J Med 2018 Sep 6; 379:913.

Hayden FG et al.

BACKGROUND

Baloxavir marboxil is a selective inhibitor of influenza cap-dependent endonuclease. It has shown therapeutic activity in preclinical models of influenza A and B virus infections, including strains resistant to current antiviral agents.

METHODS

We conducted two randomized, double-blind, controlled trials involving otherwise healthy outpatients with acute uncomplicated influenza. After a dose-ranging (10 to 40 mg) placebo-controlled trial, we undertook a placebo- and oseltamivir-controlled trial of single, weight-based doses of baloxavir (40 or 80 mg) in patients 12 to 64 years of age during the 2016–2017 season. The dose of oseltamivir was 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. The primary efficacy end point was the time to alleviation of influenza symptoms in the intention-to-treat infected population.

RESULTS

In the phase 2 trial, the median time to alleviation of influenza symptoms was 23.4 to 28.2 hours shorter in the baloxavir groups than in the placebo group (P<0.05). In the phase 3 trial, the intention-to-treat infected population included 1064 patients; 84.8 to 88.1% of patients in each group had influenza A(H3N2) infection. The median time to alleviation of symptoms was 53.7 hours (95% confidence interval [CI], 49.5 to 58.5) with baloxavir, as compared with 80.2 hours (95% CI, 72.6 to 87.1) with placebo (P<0.001). The time to alleviation of symptoms was similar with baloxavir and oseltamivir. Baloxavir was associated with greater reductions in viral load 1 day after initiation of the regimen than placebo or oseltamivir. Adverse events were reported in 20.7% of baloxavir recipients, 24.6% of placebo recipients, and 24.8% of oseltamivir recipients. The emergence of polymerase acidic protein variants with I38T/M/F substitutions conferring reduced susceptibility to baloxavir occurred in 2.2% and 9.7% of baloxavir recipients in the phase 2 trial and phase 3 trial, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Single-dose baloxavir was without evident safety concerns, was superior to placebo in alleviating influenza symptoms, and was superior to both oseltamivir and placebo in reducing the viral load 1 day after initiation of the trial regimen in patients with uncomplicated influenza. Evidence for the development of decreased susceptibility to baloxavir after treatment was also observed. (Funded by Shionogi; JapicCTI number, 153090, and CAPSTONE-1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02954354. opens in new tab.)

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1716197

 

FDA approves new drug to treat influenza [press release].

Silver Spring, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Oct 24, 2018. https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm624226.htm

December 27, 2019 at 8:23 am

An investigation of the effects of procalcitonin testing on antimicrobial prescribing in respiratory tract infections in an Irish university hospital setting: a feasibility study.

J Antimicrob Chemother. November 1, 2019 V.74 N.11 P.3352-3361

O’Riordan F1,2, Shiely F3,4, Byrne S2, O’Brien D5, Palmer B3,4, Dahly D3,4, O’Connor TM6, Curran D6, Fleming A1,2.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diagnostic uncertainty and a high prevalence of viral infections present unique challenges for antimicrobial prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Procalcitonin (PCT) has been shown to support prescribing decisions and reduce antimicrobial use safely in patients with RTIs, but recent study results have been variable.

METHODS:

We conducted a feasibility study of the introduction of PCT testing in patients admitted to hospital with a lower RTI to determine if PCT testing is an effective and worthwhile intervention to introduce to support the existing antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programme and safely decrease antimicrobial prescribing in patients admitted with RTIs.

RESULTS:

A total of 79 patients were randomized to the intervention PCT-guided treatment group and 40 patients to the standard care respiratory control group. The addition of PCT testing led to a significant decrease in duration of antimicrobial prescriptions (mean 6.8 versus 8.9 days, P = 0.012) and decreased length of hospital stay (median 7 versus 8 days, P = 0.009) between the PCT and respiratory control group. PCT did not demonstrate a significant reduction in antimicrobial consumption when measured as DDDs and days of therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

PCT testing had a positive effect on antimicrobial prescribing during this feasibility study. The successful implementation of PCT testing in a randomized controlled trial requires an ongoing comprehensive education programme, greater integration into the AMS programme and delivery of PCT results in a timely manner. This feasibility study has shown that a larger randomized controlled trial would be beneficial to further explore the positive aspects of these findings.

abstract

https://academic.oup.com/jac/article/74/11/3352/5536342

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

December 22, 2019 at 10:04 pm

Use of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Among Adults Aged ≥ 65 Years: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. November 22, 2019 V.68 N.46 P.1069-1075.

Matanock A, Lee G, Gierke R, Kobayashi M, Leidner A, Pilishvili T.

Abstract

Two pneumococcal vaccines are currently licensed for use in adults in the United States: a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 [Prevnar 13, Pfizer, Inc.]) and a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 [Pneumovax 23, Merck and Co., Inc.]).

In 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)* recommended routine use of PCV13 in series with PPSV23 for all adults aged ≥65 years based on demonstrated PCV13 safety and efficacy against PCV13-type pneumonia among adults aged ≥65 years (1).

At that time, ACIP recognized that there would be a need to reevaluate this recommendation because it was anticipated that PCV13 use in children would continue to reduce disease burden among adults through reduced carriage and transmission of vaccine serotypes from vaccinated children (i.e., PCV13 indirect effects).

On June 26, 2019, after having reviewed the evidence accrued during the preceding 3 years (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/recs/grade/PCV13.html), ACIP voted to remove the recommendation for routine PCV13 use among adults aged ≥65 years and to recommend administration of PCV13 based on shared clinical decision-making for adults aged ≥65 years who do not have an immunocompromising condition,† cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, or cochlear implant, and who have not previously received PCV13.

ACIP recognized that some adults aged ≥65 years are potentially at increased risk for exposure to PCV13 serotypes, such as persons residing in nursing homes or other long-term care facilities and persons residing in settings with low pediatric PCV13 uptake or traveling to settings with no pediatric PCV13 program, and might attain higher than average benefit from PCV13 vaccination.

When patients and vaccine providers§ engage in shared clinical decision-making for PCV13 use to determine whether PCV13 is right for a particular person, considerations might include both the person’s risk for exposure to PCV13 serotypes and their risk for developing pneumococcal disease as a result of underlying medical conditions.

All adults aged ≥65 years should continue to receive 1 dose of PPSV23. If the decision is made to administer PCV13, it should be given at least 1 year before PPSV23.

ACIP continues to recommend PCV13 in series with PPSV23 for adults aged ≥19 years with an immunocompromising condition, CSF leak, or cochlear implant (2).

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6871896/pdf/mm6846a5.pdf

 

 

December 19, 2019 at 7:46 am

Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults with Community-acquired Pneumonia. An Official Clinical Practice Guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med. October 1, 2019  V.200 N.7  e45-e67.

Metlay JP, Waterer GW, Long AC, Anzueto A, Brozek J, Crothers K, et al.

Background

This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

Methods

A multidisciplinary panel conducted pragmatic systematic reviews of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations.

Results

The panel addressed 16 specific areas for recommendations spanning questions of diagnostic testing, determination of site of care, selection of initial empiric antibiotic therapy, and subsequent management decisions. Although some recommendations remain unchanged from the 2007 guideline, the availability of results from new therapeutic trials and epidemiological investigations led to revised recommendations for empiric treatment strategies and additional management decisions.

Conclusions

The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected diagnostic and treatment strategies for adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

 

Este documento proporciona pautas de práctica clínica basadas en evidencia sobre el manejo de pacientes adultos con NAC.

Métodos

Un panel multidisciplinario realizó revisiones sistemáticas pragmáticas de la investigación relevante y aplicó la metodología de calificación de recomendaciones, evaluación, desarrollo y evaluación para recomendaciones clínicas.

Resultados

El panel abordó 16 áreas específicas para recomendaciones que abarcan preguntas sobre pruebas de diagnóstico, determinación del sitio de atención, selección de terapia ATB empírica inicial y decisiones de manejo posteriores. Aunque algunas recomendaciones permanecen sin cambios con respecto a la guía de 2007, la disponibilidad de resultados de nuevos ensayos terapéuticos e investigaciones epidemiológicas condujo a recomendaciones revisadas para estrategias de tratamiento empírico y decisiones de manejo adicionales.

Conclusiones

El panel formuló y proporcionó la justificación de las recomendaciones sobre estrategias seleccionadas de diagnóstico y tratamiento para pacientes adultos con NAC.

FULL TEXT

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST#_i6

PDF

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST

November 15, 2019 at 7:59 am

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