Posts filed under ‘Infecciones sitio quirurgico’

Differences in Diagnostic Properties Between Standard and Enrichment Culture Techniques Used in Periprosthetic Joint Infections

Journal of Arthroplasty January 2020 V.35  N.1  P.235–240

Background

Culture-negative infections can complicate the diagnosis and management of orthopedic infections, particularly periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs). This study aimed to identify differences in rate of detection of infection and organisms between cultured using standard and enriched methods.

Methods

This retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluated PJI samples obtained between January 2013 and December 2017 at Yokohama City University Hospital. Samples were assessed using standard and enrichment culture techniques. White blood cell counts, C-reactive protein levels, type of microorganism (coagulase-positive or coagulase-negative), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were investigated.

Results

A total of 151 PJI samples were included in the analysis; of these, 68 (45.0%) were positive after standard culture while 83 (55.0%) were positive only after enrichment culture. The mean white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein levels were significantly lower in the enrichment culture group than in the standard culture group (P < .01). The rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci was significantly higher in the enrichment culture group than in the standard culture group (P < .01).

Conclusion

The enrichment culture method has a higher rate of detection of infection than standard culture techniques and should, therefore, be considered when diagnosing orthopedic infections, particularly PJI.

PDF

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(19)30766-1/pdf

December 29, 2019 at 2:06 pm

Combined Measurement of D-Dimer and C-Reactive Protein Levels: Highly Accurate for Diagnosing Chronic Periprosthetic Joint Infection

Journal of Arthroplasty January 2020 V.35  N.1  P.229–234

Background

Diagnosis of chronic periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be challenging and elusive in the absence of a gold standard. D-dimer plays an important role in inflammation that occurs during infections and therefore could be a valuable biomarker for PJI. This study aims to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of D-dimer in detecting chronic PJI and to improve the accuracy of chronic PJI diagnosis through combined measurement of serum D-dimer with C-reactive protein (CRP)/erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

Methods

One hundred twenty-two patients presenting with a painful knee or hip after total hip or total knee arthroplasty for surgical revision were included in this prospective trial. Our cohort consisted of 55 patients undergoing revision for chronic PJI and 67 patients undergoing revision for aseptic failure. PJI was defined using the Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria. Receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve were analyzed for each biomarker.

Results

The area under the curve for D-dimer was 0.915 and was more accurate than serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate 0.719 and CRP 0.761. 1170 ng/mL was determined to be the optimal threshold value of D-dimer for the diagnosis of chronic PJI, with a sensitivity of 92.73% and a specificity of 74.63% in the diagnosis of chronic PJI. The combination of D-dimer and CRP tests demonstrated a sensitivity of 98.11% and negative predictive value of 96.55% for the diagnosis of chronic PJI.

Conclusion

The present study identified the D-dimer is a valuable biomarker in detecting chronic PJI. The combinations of serum D-dimer and CRP led to the improvement of sensitivity compared with those of the single-index test.

PDF

https://www.arthroplastyjournal.org/article/S0883-5403(19)30743-0/pdf

December 29, 2019 at 1:58 pm

APSIC GUIDELINES for the prevention of SSI.  

Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. November 12, 2019 V.8 P.174.

Ling ML, Apisarnthanarak A, Abbas A, et al.

Background

The Asia Pacific Society of Infection Control (APSIC) launched the APSIC Guidelines for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections in 2018. This document describes the guidelines and recommendations for the setting prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). It aims to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist healthcare facilities at Asia Pacific region in achieving high standards in preoperative, perioperative and postoperative practices.

Method

The guidelines were developed by an appointed workgroup comprising experts in the Asia Pacific region, following reviews of previously published guidelines and recommendations relevant to each section.

Results

It recommends that healthcare facilities review specific risk factors and develop effective prevention strategies, which would be cost effective at local levels. Gaps identified are best closed using a quality improvement process. Surveillance of SSIs is recommended using accepted international methodology. The timely feedback of the data analysed would help in the monitoring of effective implementation of interventions.

Conclusions

Healthcare facilities should aim for excellence in safe surgery practices. The implementation of evidence-based practices using a quality improvement process helps towards achieving effective and sustainable results.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6852795/pdf/13756_2019_Article_638.pdf

December 13, 2019 at 7:15 am

2019-11 Hospital-Acquired Infections in New York State, 2018 –  N York State Department of Health 24 Pags

Contents

Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3

Surgical Site Infections (SSIs)………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

Catheter-Associated Infections ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

Laboratory-identified (LabID) infections………………………………………………………………………………………. 6

Clostridioides difficile Infections (CDI)……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) Infections………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infections………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

Hospital Performance …………………………………………………………………………………………………………10

Role of the State Health Department…………………………………………………………………………………….23

What Patients Can do to Prevent Infections………………………………………………………………………………………..24

PDF

https://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/facilities/hospital/hospital_acquired_infections/2018/docs/hospital_acquired_infection_p1.pdf

November 20, 2019 at 7:11 am

Prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infection after operative vaginal delivery (ANODE): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10.189 P.2395–2403

Prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infection after operative vaginal delivery (ANODE): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

Background

Risk factors for maternal infection are clearly recognised, including caesarean section and operative vaginal birth. Antibiotic prophylaxis at caesarean section is widely recommended because there is clear systematic review evidence that it reduces incidence of maternal infection. Current WHO guidelines do not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis for women undergoing operative vaginal birth because of insufficient evidence of effectiveness. We aimed to investigate whether antibiotic prophylaxis prevented maternal infection after operative vaginal birth.

Methods

In a blinded, randomised controlled trial done at 27 UK obstetric units, women (aged ≥16 years) were allocated to receive a single dose of intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid or placebo (saline) following operative vaginal birth at 36 weeks gestation or later. The primary outcome was confirmed or suspected maternal infection within 6 weeks of delivery defined by a new prescription of antibiotics for specific indications, confirmed systemic infection on culture, or endometritis. We did an intention-to-treat analysis. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number 11166984, and is closed to accrual.

Findings

Between March 13, 2016, and June 13, 2018, 3427 women were randomly assigned to treatment: 1719 to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, and 1708 to placebo. Seven women withdrew, leaving 1715 in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid group and 1705 in the placebo groups. Primary outcome data were missing for 195 (6%) women. Significantly fewer women allocated to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid had a confirmed or suspected infection (180 [11%] of 1619) than women allocated to placebo (306 [19%] of 1606; risk ratio 0·58, 95% CI 0·49–0·69; p<0·0001). One woman in the placebo group reported a skin rash and two women in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid reported other allergic reactions, one of which was reported as a serious adverse event. Two other serious adverse events were reported, neither was considered causally related to the treatment.

Interpretation

This trial shows benefit of a single dose of prophylactic antibiotic after operative vaginal birth and guidance from WHO and other national organisations should be changed to reflect this.

Funding

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30773-1/fulltext

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930773-1

November 8, 2019 at 8:09 pm

The diagnostic value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI in suspected vertebral osteomyelitis – a prospective study.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. May 2018 V.45 N.5 P.798-805.

Kouijzer IJE1,2, Scheper H3, de Rooy JWJ4, Bloem JL5, Janssen MJR4, van den Hoven L6, Hosman AJF7, Visser LG3, Oyen WJG4,8, Bleeker-Rovers CP9, de Geus-Oei LF10,5.

1 Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. ilse.kouijzer@radboudumc.nl.

2 MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands. ilse.kouijzer@radboudumc.nl.

3 Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

4 Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

5 Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

6 Technical Medicine, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands.

7 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

8 Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

9 Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

10 MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis.

METHODS:

From November 2015 until December 2016, 32 patients with suspected vertebral osteomyelitis were prospectively included. All patients underwent both 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI within 48 h. All images were independently reevaluated by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physicians who were blinded to each others’ image interpretation. 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI were compared to the clinical diagnosis according to international guidelines.

RESULTS:

For 18F-FDG-PET/CT, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis were 100%, 83.3%, 90.9%, and 100%, respectively. For MRI, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 100%, 91.7%, 95.2%, and 100%, respectively. MRI detected more epidural/spinal abscesses. An important advantage of 18F-FDG-PET/CT is the detection of metastatic infection (16 patients, 50.0%).

CONCLUSION:

18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI are both necessary techniques in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. An important advantage of 18F-FDG-PET/CT is the visualization of metastatic infection, especially in patients with bacteremia. MRI is more sensitive in detection of small epidural abscesses.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5978906/pdf/259_2017_Article_3912.pdf

September 21, 2019 at 8:07 pm

2015 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Native Vertebral Osteomyelitis in Adults.

Clin Infect Dis. September 15, 2015 V.61 N.6 e26-46.

Berbari EF1, Kanj SS2, Kowalski TJ3, Darouiche RO4, Widmer AF5, Schmitt SK6, Hendershot EF7, Holtom PD8, Huddleston PM 3rd9, Petermann GW10, Osmon DR11, Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Abstract

These guidelines are intended for use by infectious disease specialists, orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and other healthcare professionals who care for patients with native vertebral osteomyelitis (NVO). They include evidence and opinion-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with NVO treated with antimicrobial therapy, with or without surgical intervention.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/61/6/e26/452579

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

 

– – –

 

Clin Infect Dis. April 1, 2016 V.62 N.7 P.953-4.

LETTER – Vertebral Osteomyelitis Guidelines.

TO THE EDITOR—I congratulate Dr Berbari and colleagues for producing the 2015 guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of vertebral osteomyelitis, despite the lack of controlled trials to guide them [1]. However, the guidelines left out any mention of coccidioidomycosis as an etiology of this infection. More than 25% of patients with disseminated coccidioidomycosis have bone and joint infections, and in adults the axial skeleton is involved in more than half of those cases [2]. Infection may be multifocal in the spine. Although …

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/62/7/953/2462943

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

September 21, 2019 at 8:05 pm

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