Posts filed under ‘Infecciones sitio quirurgico’

Staphylococcus capitis isolated from prosthetic joint infections.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. Jan 2017 V.36 N.1 P.115-122.

Tevell S1,2, Hellmark B3, Nilsdotter-Augustinsson Å4, Söderquist B5.

Author information

1 Department of Infectious Diseases, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden. staffan.tevell@liv.se

2 School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. staffan.tevell@liv.se

3 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.

4 Department of Infectious Diseases and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

5 School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.

Abstract

Further knowledge about the clinical and microbiological characteristics of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) caused by different coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) may facilitate interpretation of microbiological findings and improve treatment algorithms. Staphylococcus capitis is a CoNS with documented potential for both human disease and nosocomial spread. As data on orthopaedic infections are scarce, our aim was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of PJIs caused by S. capitis. This retrospective cohort study included three centres and 21 patients with significant growth of S. capitis during revision surgery for PJI between 2005 and 2014. Clinical data were extracted and further microbiological characterisation of the S. capitis isolates was performed. Multidrug-resistant (≥3 antibiotic groups) S. capitis was detected in 28.6 % of isolates, methicillin resistance in 38.1 % and fluoroquinolone resistance in 14.3 %; no isolates were rifampin-resistant. Heterogeneous glycopeptide-intermediate resistance was detected in 38.1 %. Biofilm-forming ability was common. All episodes were either early post-interventional or chronic, and there were no haematogenous infections. Ten patients experienced monomicrobial infections. Among patients available for evaluation, 86 % of chronic infections and 70 % of early post-interventional infections achieved clinical cure; 90 % of monomicrobial infections remained infection-free. Genetic fingerprinting with repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR; DiversiLab®) displayed clustering of isolates, suggesting that nosocomial spread might be present. Staphylococcus capitis has the potential to cause PJIs, with infection most likely being contracted during surgery or in the early postoperative period. As S. capitis might be an emerging nosocomial pathogen, surveillance of the prevalence of PJIs caused by S. capitis could be recommended.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5203848/pdf/10096_2016_Article_2777.pdf

June 22, 2017 at 5:54 pm

Distribution characteristics of Staphylococcus spp. in different phases of periprosthetic joint infection: A review.

Exp Ther Med. 2017 Jun;13(6):2599-2608.

Guo G1, Wang J1, You Y2, Tan J1, Shen H1.

Author information

1 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai 200233, P.R. China.

2 Department of Obstetrics, Fudan University Affiliated Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Shanghai 200233, P.R. China.

Abstract

Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating condition and Staphylococcus spp. are the predominant pathogens responsible, particularly coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and Staphylococcus aureus.

The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate the distribution characteristics of specific Staphylococcus spp. in different PJI phases, reveal the effect of pathogens’ feature on their distribution and suggest recommendations for antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcal PJI.

The present systematic review was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases with the aim to identify existing literature that presented the spectrum of Staphylococcus spp. that occur in PJI. Once inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 20 cohort studies involving 3,344 cases in 3,199 patients were included.

The predominant pathogen involved in PJI was indicated to be CoNS (31.2%), followed by S. aureus (28.8%). This trend was more apparent in hip replacement procedures. In addition, almost equal proportions of CoNS and S. aureus (28.6 and 30.0%, respectively) were indicated in the delayed phase. CoNS (36.6%) were the predominant identified organism in the early phase, whereas S. aureus (38.3%) occurred primarily in the late phase.

In PJI caused by S. aureus, the number of cases of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was ~2.5-fold greater than that of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA occurred predominantly in the early phase, whereas MSSA was largely observed in the delayed and late phases.

With regards to antibiotic treatment, the feature of various pathogens and the phases of PJI were the primary considerations.

The present review provides useful information for clinical practice and scientific research of PJI.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5450602/pdf/etm-13-06-2599.pdf

June 22, 2017 at 5:29 pm

Clindamycin-rifampin combination therapy for staphylococcal periprosthetic joint infections: a retrospective observational study.

BMC Infect Dis. May 2, 2017 V.17 N.1 P.321.

Leijtens B1, Elbers JBW2, Sturm PD3, Kullberg BJ4, Schreurs BW2.

Author information

1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Radboud University Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. borg.leijtens@radboudumc.nl.

2 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Radboud University Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

3 Department of Medical Microbiology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

4 Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Centre for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Staphylococcal species account for more than 50% of periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) and antimicrobial therapy with rifampin-based combination regimens has been shown effective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of clindamycin in combination with rifampin for the management of staphylococcal PJI.

METHODS:

In this retrospective cohort study, patients were included who received clindamycin-rifampin combination therapy to treat a periprosthetic hip or knee infection by Staphylococcus aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients were treated according to a standardized treatment algorithm and followed for a median of 54 months. Of the 36 patients with periprosthetic staphylococcal infections, 31 had an infection of the hip, and five had an infection of the knee. Eighteen patients underwent debridement and retention of the implant (DAIR) for an early infection, the other 18 patients underwent revision of loose components in presumed aseptic loosening with unexpected positive cultures.

RESULTS:

In this study, we report a success rate of 86%, with five recurrent/persistent PJI in 36 treated patients. Cure rate was 78% (14/18) in the DAIR patients and 94% (17/18) in the revision group. Five patients (14%) discontinued clindamycin-rifampin due to side effects. Of the 31 patients completing the clindamycin-rifampin regimen 29 patients (94%) were cured.

CONCLUSION:

Combined therapy with clindamycin and rifampin is a safe, well tolerated and effective regimen for the treatment of staphylococcal periprosthetic infection.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5414295/pdf/12879_2017_Article_2429.pdf

June 20, 2017 at 7:11 pm

Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Bacteroides Prosthetic Joint Infections.

J Bone Jt Infect. 2017 Mar 19;2(3):122-126.

Shah N1, Osmon D1, Tande AJ1, Steckelberg J1, Sierra R2, Walker R1, Berbari EF1.

Author information

1 Division of Infectious Disease, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

2 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Abstract

Clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with Bacteroides prosthetic joint infection (PJI) have not been well described in the literature.

The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the outcome of patients with Bacteroides PJI and to review risk factors associated with failure of therapy.

Between 1/1969 and 12/2012, 20 episodes of Bacteroides PJI in 17 patients were identified at our institution. The mean age of the patients in this cohort at the time of diagnosis was 55.6 years; 59% (n=10) had knee involvement. Twenty four percent (n=4) had diabetes mellitus, and 24% had a history of either gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) pathology prior to the diagnosis of PJI. Thirty five percent (n=6) were immunosuppressed.

The initial medical/surgical strategy was resection arthroplasty (n=9, 50%) or debridement and implant retention (n=5, 28%). Thirty seven percent (n=7) were treated with metronidazole. Eighty percent (n=4) of patients that failed therapy had undergone debridement and retention of their prosthesis, as compared to none of those treated with resection arthroplasty. Seventy percent (n=14) of patient episodes were infection free at their last date of follow up.

In conclusion, a significant proportion of patients with Bacteroides PJI are immunosuppressed and have an underlying GI or GU tract pathology. Retention and debridement of the prosthesis is associated with a higher risk of treatment failure.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5441143/pdf/jbjiv02p0122.pdf

June 20, 2017 at 5:39 pm

Use of Chlorhexidine Preparations in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

J Bone Jt Infect. 2017 Jan 1;2(1):15-22.

George J1, Klika AK1, Higuera CA1.

Author information

1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Abstract

Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a serious complication after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Chlorhexidine is a widely used antiseptic because of its rapid and persistent action. It is well tolerated and available in different formulations at various concentrations. Chlorhexidine can be used for pre-operative skin cleansing, surgical site preparation, hand antisepsis of the surgical team and intra-articular irrigation of infected joints. The optimal intra-articular concentration of chlorhexidine gluconate in irrigation solution is 2%, to provide a persistent decrease in biofilm formation, though cytotoxicity might be an issue. Although chlorhexidine is relatively cheap, routine use of chlorhexidine without evidence of clear benefits can lead to unnecessary costs, adverse effects and even emergence of resistance. This review focuses on the current applications of various chlorhexidine formulations in TJA. As the treatment of PJI is challenging and expensive, effective preparations of chlorhexidine could help in the prevention and control of PJI.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5423571/pdf/jbjiv02p0015.pdf

June 20, 2017 at 2:21 pm

Treatment of Periprosthetic Joint Infection Using Antimicrobials: Dilute Povidone-Iodine Lavage.

J Bone Jt Infect. 2017 Jan 1;2(1):10-14.             doi: 10.7150/jbji.16448. eCollection 2017.

Ruder JA1, Springer BD2.

Author information

1 Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics.

2 OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, NC 28207.

Abstract

Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) remain a challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon to treat and remain a leading cause of failure of both primary and revision total joint arthroplasty. Once a PJI develops, surgical treatment is generally indicated and includes an aggressive irrigation and debridement. One component of the irrigation and debridement involves the use of an antiseptic irrigating solution. In primary and revision TJA, dilute povidone-iodine lavage can be performed prior to wound closure. Approximately 17.5mL of 10% povidone-iodine is diluted with 500-1000cc of normal saline. The wound is then irrigated with the dilute povidone-iodine for 3 minutes. The dilute povidone-iodine is then thoroughly irrigated and washed out of the wound with normal saline prior to wound closure. The use of dilute povidone-iodine lavage prior to wound closure has been shown to reduce the risk of deep surgical site infection in multiple surgical specialties. In primary TJA, it has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of infection, without any associated adverse effects. It is also included in multiple protocols for the surgical treatment of PJI. Dilute povidone-iodine lavage provides a safe and inexpensive method to reduce the rate of PJI in TJA.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5423577/pdf/jbjiv02p0010.pdf

June 19, 2017 at 7:20 pm

JAMA Surgery May 3, 2017

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guideline for the prevention of surgical site infection, 2017

Berríos-Torres SI et al.

Importance 

The human and financial costs of treating surgical site infections (SSIs) are increasing. The number of surgical procedures performed in the United States continues to rise, and surgical patients are initially seen with increasingly complex comorbidities. It is estimated that approximately half of SSIs are deemed preventable using evidence-based strategies.

Objective 

To provide new and updated evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of SSI.

Evidence Review 

A targeted systematic review of the literature was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from 1998 through April 2014. A modified Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to assess the quality of evidence and the strength of the resulting recommendation and to provide explicit links between them. Of 5487 potentially relevant studies identified in literature searches, 5759 titles and abstracts were screened, and 896 underwent full-text review by 2 independent reviewers. After exclusions, 170 studies were extracted into evidence, evaluated, and categorized.

Findings 

Before surgery, patients should shower or bathe (full body) with soap (antimicrobial or nonantimicrobial) or an antiseptic agent on at least the night before the operative day. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered only when indicated based on published clinical practice guidelines and timed such that a bactericidal concentration of the agents is established in the serum and tissues when the incision is made. In cesarean section procedures, antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered before skin incision. Skin preparation in the operating room should be performed using an alcohol-based agent unless contraindicated. For clean and clean-contaminated procedures, additional prophylactic antimicrobial agent doses should not be administered after the surgical incision is closed in the operating room, even in the presence of a drain. Topical antimicrobial agents should not be applied to the surgical incision. During surgery, glycemic control should be implemented using blood glucose target levels less than 200 mg/dL, and normothermia should be maintained in all patients. Increased fraction of inspired oxygen should be administered during surgery and after extubation in the immediate postoperative period for patients with normal pulmonary function undergoing general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Transfusion of blood products should not be withheld from surgical patients as a means to prevent SSI.

Conclusions and Relevance

This guideline is intended to provide new and updated evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of SSI and should be incorporated into comprehensive surgical quality improvement programs to improve patient safety.

 

FULL TEXT

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamasurgery/fullarticle/2623725

PDF (CLIC en “DOWNLOAD PDF”)

May 27, 2017 at 10:42 am

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