Posts filed under ‘Infecciones sitio quirurgico’

Moxifloxacin plus rifampin as an alternative for levofloxacin plus rifampin in the treatment of a prosthetic joint infection with Staphylococcus aureus

International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents January 2018 V.51 N.1 P.38–42

Marjan Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Eduard Tornero, Laura Morata, Prashant V. Nannan Panday, Paul C. Jutte, Guillem Bori, Greetje A. Kampinga, Alex Soriano


  • Excellent outcome with moxifloxacin/rifampin combination therapy in the treatment of early PJI caused by MSSA.
  • Moxifloxacin is an attractive agent in treatment of PJI.
  • Dose adjustments are not required in patients with renal insufficiency.
  • Moxifloxacin exhibits a high genetic barrier for resistance.
  • Moxifloxacin/rifampin may be used as an alternative for levofloxacin/rifampin in the treatment of early PJI caused by MSSA.


The combination of a fluoroquinolone with rifampin is one of the cornerstones in the treatment of prosthetic joint infections (PJI) caused by staphylococci. Moxifloxacin is highly active against methicillin–susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and, therefore, is an attractive agent to use. However, several studies reported a lowering in serum moxifloxacin levels when combined with rifampin. The clinical relevance remains unclear. We determined the outcome of patients with early acute PJI caused by MSSA treated with either moxifloxacin/rifampin or levofloxacin/rifampin.


Medical files of patients treated with moxifloxacin/rifampin (University Medical Centre Groningen) or levofloxacin/rifampin (Hospital Clinic Barcelona) were retrospectively reviewed (2005–2015). Treatment failure was defined as the need for revision surgery and/or suppressive therapy, death by infection or a relapse of infection during follow-up.


Differences in baseline characteristics between the two cohorts were observed, but prognostic parameters for failure, as defined by the KLIC-score (Kidney failure, Liver cirrhosis, Index surgery, C–reactive protein and Cemented prosthesis), were similar in the two groups (2.9 [1.5 SD] for the moxifloxacin group vs. 2.2 [1.2 SD] for the levofloxacin group [P?=?0.16]). With a mean follow-up of 50 months (36 SD) in the moxifloxacin group, and 67 months (50 SD) in the levofloxacin group (P?=?0.36), treatment was successful in 89% vs. 87.5%, respectively (P?=?0.89). None of the failures in the moxifloxacin group were due to rifampin– or moxifloxacin–resistant S. aureus strains.


Our data indicate that moxifloxacin combined with rifampin is as clinically effective as levofloxacin/rifampin for early acute PJI caused by MSSA.




February 5, 2018 at 6:05 pm

Long-term acute care hospitals.

Clinical Infectious Diseases August 1, 2009  V.49 N.3 P.438-43.     

Munoz-Price LS1.

Author information



Long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) are health care facilities that admit complex patients with acute care needs (eg, mechanical ventilator weaning, administration of intravenous antibiotics, and complex wound care) for a mean duration of stay of 25 days. LTACHs are different than nursing homes and were initially created in the 1990s in an effort to decrease Medicare costs by facilitating prompt discharge from intensive care units of patients with difficulty weaning mechanical ventilation; however, current admission diagnoses are quite broad. Patients admitted to these facilities have multiple comorbidities and are at risk for colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms. LTACH patients have been shown to have high rates of hospital-acquired infections, including central vascular catheter-associated bloodstream infection and ventilator-associated pneumonia. In addition, LTACHs have been implicated in various regional outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. This review summarizes the limited amount of scientific literature on LTACHs while highlighting their infection control problems, as well as the role LTACHs play on regional outbreaks.



January 30, 2018 at 4:08 pm

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

Reumatol Clin. 2017 Mar 7. 

Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Molina Collada J1, Rico Nieto A2, Díaz de Bustamante Ussia M3, Balsa Criado A4.

Author information

1 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address:

2 Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

3 Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.

4 Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España.


We describe a case of septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum, gram-positive bacilli that are usually commensal organisms of skin and mucosal membranes, but are seldom implicated in native septic arthritis. An 84-year-old man with Corynebacterium striatum septic arthritis of his native left knee and no response to conventional antibiotic therapy. Thus, the patient was allowed to take dalbavancin for compassionate use, with an excellent clinical outcome. This case emphasizes de role of Corynebacterium striatum in native joint infections and highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate treatment in improving the clinical outcome.


October 22, 2017 at 12:43 pm

A spontaneous joint infection with Corynebacterium striatum.

J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Feb;45(2):656-8.

Scholle D1.

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, Legacy Emanuel and Good Samaritan Hospitals, 1015 NW 22nd Ave., Portland, OR 97210, USA.


Corynebacterium striatum is a ubiquitous saprophyte with the potential to cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. Until now, spontaneous infection of a natural joint has not been reported. When phenotyping failed, gene sequencing was used to identify the species. The isolate demonstrated high-level resistance to most antibiotics.



October 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm

Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infections: Results From a Retrospective Series and Implications for the Design of Prospective Clinical Trials

Open Forum Infectious Diseases April 2017 V.4 N.2

Elizabeth L. Alexander; Jeffery Loutit; Mario Tumbarello; Richard Wunderink; Tim Felton …


The increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant Gram negatives, such as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), has resulted in a critical need for new antimicrobials. Most studies of new antimicrobials have been performed in patients with nondrug-resistant pathogens. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with CRE infections to inform the design of phase 3 clinical trials.


This was a retrospective study at 22 centers in 4 countries. Baseline data, treatment, and outcomes were collected in patients with complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI)/acute pyelonephritis (AP), hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia (HABP), ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (VABP), and bacteremia due to CRE.


Two hundred fifty-six cases of CRE infection were identified: 75 cUTI/AP, 21 HABP, 20 VABP, and 140 bacteremia. The patient population had significant comorbidities: 32.8% had chronic renal insufficiency, and 26.2% were immunocompromised. Illness severity at presentation was high: 29.3% presented with septic shock. Treatment regimens varied widely; however, a majority of patients received combination therapy. Outcomes were universally poor (28-day mortality was 28.1%) across all sites of infection, particularly in dialysis patients and those with sepsis.


The CRE infections occured in patients with substantial comorbidities and were associated with high mortality and low rates of clinical cure with available antibiotics. Patients with these comorbidities are often excluded from enrollment in clinical trials for registration of new drugs. These results led to changes in the inclusion/exclusion criteria of a phase 3 trial to better represent the patient population with CRE infections and enable enrollment. Observational studies may become increasingly important to guide clinical trial design, inform on the existing standard of care, and provide an external control for subsequent trials.


September 3, 2017 at 6:51 pm

In vitro activity of tedizolid and linezolid against Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections

European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases September 2017 V.36 N.9 P. 1549–1552

Littorin, B. Hellmark, Å. Nilsdotter-Augustinsson & B. Söderquist

1.School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and HealthÖrebro UniversityÖrebroSweden

2.Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical MicrobiologyÖrebro University HospitalÖrebroSweden

3.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health SciencesLinköping UniversityLinköpingSweden

4.Department of Infectious DiseasesCounty Council of ÖstergötlandLinköpingSweden

5.Departments of Infectious Diseases and Laboratory Medicine, Clinical MicrobiologyÖrebro University HospitalÖrebroSweden

Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are rare but long-lasting and are serious complications without any spontaneous resolution, requiring additional surgery and long-term treatment with antibiotics.

Staphylococci are the most important aetiological agents of PJIs, and among the coagulase-negative staphylococci Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most common.

However, S. epidermidis often displays multidrug resistance (MDR), demanding additional treatment options.

The objective was to examine the effectiveness of tedizolid and linezolid against S. epidermidis isolated from PJIs. The standard antibiotic susceptibility pattern of S. epidermidis (n = 183) obtained from PJIs was determined by disc diffusion test, and MIC was determined by Etest for tedizolid, linezolid, and vancomycin.

Tedizolid displayed MIC values ranging from 0.094 to 0.5 mg/L (MIC50: 0.19 mg/L, MIC90: 0.38 mg/L), linezolid MIC values ranging from 0.25 to 2 mg/L (MIC50: 0.75 mg/L, MIC90: 1 mg/L), and vancomycin MIC values ranging from 0.5 to 3 mg/L (MIC50 and MIC90 both 2 mg/L).

According to the disc diffusion test, 153/183 (84%) isolates were resistant to ≥3 antibiotic groups, indicating MDR.

In conclusion, S. epidermidis isolates from PJIs were fully susceptible, and the MIC50 and MIC90 values for tedizolid were two- to four-fold dilution steps lower compared with linezolid.

Tedizolid is not approved, and there are no reports of long-term treatment, but it may display better tolerability and fewer adverse effects than linezolid; it thus could be a possible treatment option for PJIs, alone or in combination with rifampicin.



August 22, 2017 at 8:25 am

Finegoldia magna: a forgotten pathogen in prosthetic joint infection rediscovered by molecular biology.

Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Oct 15;49(8):1244-7.

Levy PY1, Fenollar F, Stein A, Borrione F, Raoult D.

Author information

1 Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Emergentes-Unité Mixte de Recherche, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 6236-Institut de Recherche et Developpement 198, Faculté de Médecine, Université de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France.


In this study, we describe 13 patients with prosthetic infections due to Finegoldia magna (2% of our tested series).

Patients presented with either polymicrobial infection after an open fracture or nosocomial infection after recent prosthesis implantation.

Molecular techniques are critical for diagnosis, and recommended antibiotic prophylaxis has poor activity against F. magna.


August 10, 2017 at 3:42 pm

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