Posts filed under ‘Infecciones virales’

ARGENTINA – Confirmación de tres nuevos casos de sarampión en niños. Alto riesgo de transmisibilidad

ACTUALIZACIÓN EPIDEMIOLÓGICA 13/0/2019 – Ministerio salud Nación

En virtud de la situación epidemiológica regional y local respecto a la confirmación de tres casos de

sarampión en niños residentes de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires y la Provincia de Buenos Aires, la

Secretaria de Gobierno de Salud emite la siguiente actualización…..

TEXTO COMPLETO

https://www.argentina.gob.ar/sites/default/files/sarampion_13_septiembre_2019.pdf

 

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September 14, 2019 at 9:39 am

Sep. 11, 2019 Confirmación de dos casos de sarampión en viajeros. Alto riesgo de transmisibilidad Ministerio Salud Argentina

ACTUALIZACION EPIDEMIOLOGICA

En virtud de la situación del brote de sarampión en Brasil y otros países de la región y el mundo, y la confirmación de dos casos en turistas extranjeros arribados a España provenientes de Argentina con diagnóstico de sarampión, la Secretaria de Gobierno de Salud emite la siguiente actualización …

Boletín completo

https://www.argentina.gob.ar/sites/default/files/sarampion_alerta-11-09-2019.pdf

September 12, 2019 at 7:54 am

Confirmación de caso de sarampión en Ciudad de Buenos Aires con antecedente de viaje a Brasil

ALERTA EPIDEMIOLÓGICA 4/Septiembre/2019 – SE 36

En virtud de la situación de brote de sarampión en Brasil y otros países de la región y el mundo, y la confirmación de un caso en un ciudadano argentino con antecedente de viaje, la Secretaría de Gobierno de Salud emite el presente alerta:

SITUACIÓN ACTUAL

Se confirmó un caso de sarampión en un hombre de 44 años residente en la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, atendido en efector privado, con antecedente de viaje a Brasil, que comenzó con fiebre el día 10 de agosto, agregando exantema cuatro días después. El caso se confirmó por serología (IgM positiva en suero) y seroconversión de IgG, así como RT-PCR positiva en orina. Las muestras fueron procesadas por el efector privado y se confirmaron en el Laboratorio Nacional de Referencia ANLIS Carlos G. Malbrán. Se encuentran en desarrollo las pruebas para identificación de genotipo y linaje viral. La fuente de infección está en investigación. Se iniciaron acciones de prevención y control en los contactos del caso, quienes se encuentran en seguimiento…

ARTICULO COMPLETO

https://www.argentina.gob.ar/sites/default/files/2019-09-04-alerta-sarampion.pdf

September 9, 2019 at 3:10 pm

Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Adults: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. August 16, 2019 V.68 N.32 P.698-702.

Meites E, Szilagyi PG, Chesson HW, Unger ER, Romero JR, Markowitz LE.

Abstract

Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is recommended to prevent new HPV infections and HPV-associated diseases, including some cancers.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)* routinely recommends HPV vaccination at age 11 or 12 years; vaccination can be given starting at age 9 years.

Catch-up vaccination has been recommended since 2006 for females through age 26 years, and since 2011 for males through age 21 years and certain special populations through age 26 years.

This report updates ACIP catch-up HPV vaccination recommendations and guidance published in 2014, 2015, and 2016 (1-3). Routine recommendations for vaccination of adolescents have not changed. In June 2019, ACIP recommended catch-up HPV vaccination for all persons through age 26 years.

ACIP did not recommend catch-up vaccination for all adults aged 27 through 45 years, but recognized that some persons who are not adequately vaccinated might be at risk for new HPV infection and might benefit from vaccination in this age range; therefore, ACIP recommended shared clinical decision-making regarding potential HPV vaccination for these persons.

FULL TEXT

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6832a3.htm?s_cid=mm6832a3_w

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/pdfs/mm6832a3-H.pdf

 

August 29, 2019 at 10:54 am

Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Mononucleosis as an Imitator of Severe Preeclampsia.

AJP Rep. january 2017 V.7 N.1 :e5-e7. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1597265.

Staley SA1, Smid MC2, Dotters-Katz SK2, Stringer EM2.

1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

2 Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

Background

In pregnancy, conditions presenting with hematologic abnormalities, transaminitis, and proteinuria pose diagnostic challenges in pregnancy.

Case

We present the case of an 18-year-old woman, G1P0, at 33 weeks’ gestation with fever of unknown cause, who developed progressively elevated liver enzymes, proteinuria, and thrombocytopenia, due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection.

Conclusion

Acute infection with EBV should be included in the differential diagnosis of preeclampsia with severe features, particularly in the setting of fever. Supportive treatment and observation may prevent iatrogenic preterm birth.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5303016/pdf/10-1055-s-0036-1597265.pdf

August 18, 2019 at 7:36 pm

Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus in the Human Placenta and Its Pathologic Characteristics.

J Korean Med Sci. December 2017 V.32 N.12 P.1959-1966. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2017.32.12.1959.

Kim Y1,2, Kim HS3, Park JS3, Kim CJ4, Kim WH5.

1 Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

2 Laboratory of Epigenetics, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

4 Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

5 Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. woohokim@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a common pathogen in humans, is suspected as the cause of multiple pregnancy-related pathologies including depression, preeclampsia, and stillbirth. Moreover, transmission of EBV through the placenta has been reported. However, the focus of EBV infection within the placenta has remained unknown to date. In this study, we proved the expression of latent EBV genes in the endometrial glandular epithelial cells of the placenta and investigated the cytological characteristics of these cells. Sixty-eight placentas were obtained from pregnant women. Tissue microarray was constructed. EBV latent genes including EBV-encoding RNA-1 (EBER1), Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1), late membrane antigen (LMP1), and RPMS1 were detected with silver in situ hybridization and/or mRNA in situ hybridization. Nuclear features of EBV-positive cells in EBV-infected placenta were compared with those of EBV-negative cells via image analysis. Sixteen placentas (23.5%) showed positive expression of all 4 EBV latent genes; only the glandular epithelial cells of the decidua showed EBV gene expression. EBV infection status was not significantly correlated with maternal, fetal, or placental factors. The nuclei of EBV-positive cells were significantly larger, longer, and round-shaped than those of EBV-negative cells regardless of EBV-infection status of the placenta. For the first time, evidence of EBV gene expression has been shown in placental tissues. Furthermore, we have characterized its cytological features, allowing screening of EBV infection through microscopic examination.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680494/pdf/jkms-32-1959.pdf

August 18, 2019 at 7:35 pm

Possible clearance of transfusion-acquired nef/LTR-deleted attenuated HIV-1 infection by an elite controller with CCR5 Δ32 heterozygous and HLA-B57 genotype

J Virus Erad.  Apr 1, 2019 V.5 N.2 P.73-83.

Zaunders J1,2, Dyer WB3,4, Churchill M5, Munier CML2, Cunningham PH1, Suzuki K1, McBride K2, Hey-Nguyen W2, Koelsch K2, Wang B6, Hiener B7, Palmer S7, Gorry PR5, Bailey M2, Xu Y2, Danta M8, Seddiki N9, Cooper DA1,2, Saksena NK10,11, Sullivan JS3,12, Riminton S13, Learmont J3, Kelleher AD1,2.

Author information

1 Centre for Applied Medical Research, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

2 Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

3 Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

4 Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

5 School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, College of Science, Engineering and Health, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia.

6 Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW, Australia.

7 Centre for Virus Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

8 Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

9 Vaccine Research Institute, Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Est Créteil, Créteil, France.

10 IGO Neurodegenerative Disease Section, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

11 China National Gene Bank, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Shenzhen, China.

12 Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

13 Department of Clinical Immunology, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Subject C135 is one of the members of the Sydney Blood Bank Cohort, infected in 1981 through transfusion with attenuated nef/3′ long terminal repeat (LTR)-deleted HIV-1, and has maintained undetectable plasma viral load and steady CD4 cell count, in the absence of therapy. Uniquely, C135 combines five factors separately associated with control of viraemia: nef/LTR-deleted HIV-1, HLA-B57, HLA-DR13, heterozygous CCR5 Δ32 genotype and vigorous p24-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation. Therefore, we studied in detail viral burden and immunological responses in this individual.

METHODS:

PBMC and gut and lymph node biopsy samples were analysed for proviral HIV-1 DNA by real-time and nested PCRs, and nef/LTR alleles by nested PCR. HIV-specific antibodies were studied by Western blotting, and CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses were measured by proliferation and cytokine production in vitro.

RESULTS:

PBMC samples from 1996, but not since, showed amplification of nef alleles with gross deletions. Infectious HIV-1 was never recovered. Proviral HIV-1 DNA was not detected in recent PBMC or gut or lymph node biopsy samples. C135 has a consistently weak antibody response and a substantial CD4+ T cell proliferative response to a previously described HLA-DR13-restricted epitope of HIV-1 p24 in vitro, which augmented a CD8+ T cell response to an immunodominant HLA-B57-restricted epitope of p24, while his T cells show reduced levels of CCR5.

CONCLUSIONS:

Subject C135’s early PCR and weak antibody results are consistent with limited infection with a poorly replicating nef/LTR-deleted strain of HIV-1. With his HLA-B57-restricted gag-specific CD8 and helper HLA-DR13-restricted CD4 T cell proliferative responses, C135 appears to have cleared his HIV-1 infection 37 years after transfusion.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6543488/pdf/jve-5-73.pdf

August 16, 2019 at 3:35 pm

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