Posts filed under ‘Infecciones virales’

Association Between Cytomegalovirus Reactivation and Clinical Outcomes in Immunocompetent Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Open Forum Infectious Diseases April 2017 V.4 N.2

Philippe Lachance; Justin Chen; Robin Featherstone; Wendy I. Sligl

Background.

The aim of our systematic review was to investigate the association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and outcomes in immunocompetent critically ill patients.

Methods.

We searched electronic databases and gray literature for original studies and abstracts published between 1990 and October 2016. The review was limited to studies including critically ill immunocompetent patients. Cytomegalovirus reactivation was defined as positive polymerase chain reaction, pp65 antigenemia, or viral culture from blood or bronchoalveolar lavage. Selected patient-centered outcomes included mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), and nosocomial infections. Health resource utilization outcomes included intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay.

Results.

Twenty-two studies were included. In our primary analysis, CMV reactivation was associated with increased ICU mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87–3.47), overall mortality (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.60–2.56), duration of mechanical ventilation (mean difference 6.60 days; 95% CI, 3.09–10.12), nosocomial infections (OR, 3.20; 95% CI, 2.05–4.98), need for RRT (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.31–4.31), and ICU length of stay (mean difference 8.18 days; 95% CI, 6.14–10.22). In addition, numerous sensitivity analyses were performed.

Conclusions.

In this meta-analysis, CMV reactivation was associated with worse clinical outcomes and greater health resource utilization in critically ill patients. However, it remains unclear whether CMV reactivation plays a causal role or if it is a surrogate for more severe illness.

PDF

https://watermark.silverchair.com/api/watermark?token=AQECAHi208BE49Ooan9kkhW_Ercy7Dm3ZL_9Cf3qfKAc485ysgAAAdcwggHTBgkqhkiG9w0BBwagggHEMIIBwAIBADCCAbkGCSqGSIb3DQEHATAeBglghkgBZQMEAS4wEQQMgS29QRsi_OI3SkaMAgEQgIIBigRs9nl2ylsVhYS_sYzV1Exhw5kNEVc_CDMHi9al85en5nmbiM0fSguSAPaX7eVjsRODgkAPeEpkpHFXtT5ee2umJp97CEvGaAbkiVReIdzG4W2RNfMvE2sN1dsphR2nXEn42SJyigJqE4fzz8cIaXZ_D-EACpZzDmIRmUo86ZcUsycSI2PzFbJFj19cTvvoID75bRPJGugrZ8SAfBf6V6-1IrrVl8xG1P7LAmi8eED3QPkcOjtAWOyzyW8WPYJ_5JOJPPAUzlNTmWAKP_9QjSg3NBavgOdzFrhwpzWnF7DYh5qVYp2bg2jrG3iXICmUVNPuC32npr3L2qEWvfmA4-_gQfRgRLvm8G42pCbdO1bBp5NGgHoMFnGHIlF3s-z4Xx7as7oIryKBJsd-MG9CE5kkL9d_x6nJLEr-WqRPZF6rmWl_0VWYfbOyAIn7u3OJrtX9NrLBsFWsmCxKa7Ghsvbvfkk9jpoerEn8x48ljyevLRq7bimX0gm-Vgo3GtltcVdajTLQ5-rUsEQ

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September 3, 2017 at 6:43 pm

Serum HBeAg and HBV DNA levels are not always proportional and only high levels of HBeAg most likely correlate with high levels of HBV DNA.

MEDICINE August 2017 V.96 N.33

Chen, Ping PhDa,b; Xie, Qinfen MSa; Lu, Xuan BAb; Yu, Chengbo PhDb; Xu, Kaijin PhDb; Ruan, Bing PhDb; Cao, Hongcui PhDb; Gao, Hainv PhDa; Li, Lanjuan MDb,*

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the correlation between quantitative hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA levels, and to determine whether semiquantitative measurement of HBeAg can indicate the extent of HBV replication in HBeAg-positive subjects in the immune tolerant phase.

A cross-sectional, community-based survey was carried out in 12 communities of 2 counties in Zhejiang Province, China.

A panel of 788 HBeAg-positive subjects was divided into 4 groups according to HBV DNA level.

Groups I (n = 111), II (n = 91), III (n = 124), and IV (n = 462) had HBV DNA levels below 103 copies/mL (PCR undetectable), between 103 and 105 copies/mL (PCR detectable), between 105 and 2 × 107 copies/mL (hybridization detectable), and >2 × 107 copies/mL, respectively.

The HBeAg level correlated well with the HBV DNA level (R2 = 0.658; P < .01) on a log scale.

The average HBeAg level in group IV was significantly higher than those in the other 3 groups, and the best HBeAg cut-off value for differentiating group IV from the other 3 groups was 768 S/CO, with a sensitivity of 94.4% and specificity of 91.1%.

Semiquantification of HBeAg could indicate a relative HBV DNA level in HBeAg-positive subjects in the immune tolerant phase.

FULL TEXT

http://journals.lww.com/md-journal/Fulltext/2017/08180/Serum_HBeAg_and_HBV_DNA_levels_are_not_always.22.aspx

PDF (hacer CLIC en “Article as PDF”)

August 19, 2017 at 12:08 pm

Editor’s Choice: Hepatitis C Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis in the Healthcare Worker: Why Direct-Acting Antivirals Don’t Change a Thing

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 1, 2017 V.64 N.1 P.92-99

Susanna Naggie, David P. Holland, Mark S. Sulkowski, and David L. Thomas

1Duke Clinical Research Institute

2Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

3Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

4Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Currently, 380 000–400 000 occupational exposures to blood-borne pathogens occur annually in the United States. The management for occupational HIV or hepatitis B virus exposures includes postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) when necessary; however, PEP is not recommended for hepatitis C virus (HCV) exposures.

Recent approval of HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has renewed discussions as to whether these therapies could be used to prevent infection after exposure. There are no published studies addressing this question, but the prescribing of DAAs for PEP has been reported.

We will discuss the differences in transmission of the 3 most common blood-borne pathogens, the natural history of early HCV infection, and the scientific rationale for PEP.

In particular, we will discuss how the low feasibility of conducting an adequately powered clinical trial of DAA use for PEP and the low cost-effectiveness of such an intervention is not supportive of targeting limited resources for such use.

PDF

https://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/1/92.full.pdf+html

 

 

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 1, 2017 V.64 N.1 P.100-101

Editor’s Choice: Editorial Commentary: Decision Science at Work: The Case of Hepatitis C Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis

Joshua A. Barocas and Benjamin P. Linas

1Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital

2Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health

3Boston Medical Center, Massachusetts

In this issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Naggie et al discuss clinical decision making and present the results of a decision analysis examining the cost of hepatitis C virus (HCV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) among healthcare workers who experience a needlestick exposure to HCV-positive body fluids.

The authors discuss that, in an era when we can cure essentially all HCV infections, there are only 3 motivations for PEP. First, it may make sense to use PEP to prevent infections if doing so would decrease HCV transmission during the period of active HCV viremia. The paper succinctly reviews the evidence and quickly makes clear that among healthcare workers in the United States with a known HCV exposure, basic universal precautions reduce the risk of forward transmission to essentially zero.

A second motivation might be cost. Given that HCV medications are expensive, a shorter course PEP may be cost saving compared with full treatment for HCV infection. To address the possible economic rationale for PEP, the authors developed a decision tree to estimate the costs of PEP for HCV in a hypothetical cohort of 100 healthcare workers who had suffered a needlestick injury. They used the model to compare the outcomes with PEP to those with a strategy of “no PEP and treat only patients who develop chronic HCV infection.”

A few notable assumptions were made—namely, that PEP was 100% effective at preventing infection, while treatment for chronic HCV was only 98% effective with the first line of therapy. In addition, individuals who failed first-line treatment for chronic HCV infection were retreated with 100% . . .

PDF

https://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/1/100.full.pdf+html

August 19, 2017 at 10:30 am

Editor’s Choice: Coinfection With Zika and Dengue-2 Viruses in a Traveler Returning From Haiti, 2016: Clinical Presentation and Genetic Analysis

Clinical Infectious Diseases January 1, 2017 V.64 N.1 P.72-75

BRIEF REPORTS

Nicole M. Iovine, John Lednicky, Kartikeya Cherabuddi, Hannah Crooke, Sarah K. White, Julia C. Loeb, Eleonora Cella, Massimo Ciccozzi, Marco Salemi, and J. Glenn Morris, Jr

1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine

2Emerging Pathogens Institute

3Department of Environmental and Global Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions

4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions

5Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville

6Department of Infectious Parasitic and Immunomediated Diseases, Reference Centre on Phylogeny, Molecular Epidemiology and Microbial Evolution/Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy

Zika virus and dengue virus serotype 2 were isolated from a patient with travel to Haiti who developed fever, rash, arthralgias, and conjunctivitis. The infecting Zika virus was related to Venezuelan and Brazilian strains but evolved along a lineage originating from strains isolated in 2014 in the same region of Haiti.

PDF

https://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/1/72.full.pdf+html

August 19, 2017 at 10:26 am

EDITORIAL – Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

Rev.MVZ Córdoba 20(3):4675-4676, 2015

Virus de Oropuche: Un virus ignorado pero presente

El virus de Oropouche deriva su nombre de la localidad de Vegas de Oropuche, la cual se encuentra en la isla de Trinidad y Tobago, en donde fue detectado en 1955 en un paciente febril y en mosquitos Coquilletidia venezuelenzis.

El virus de Oropouche es prevalente en muchas regiones de América del Sur y del Caribe.

En el ciclo silvestre, el virus tiene varios mosquitos vectores: Culicoides paraensis, Coquilletidia venezuelenzis y Aedes serratus.

Los mamíferos silvestres son picados por estos mosquitos y aumentan las viremias, como en el oso perezoso (Bradypus tridactiyus), primates (Aloutta sanguinus) y roedores entre otros.

En el ciclo urbano los vectores son mosquitos Culicoides paraensis y Culex quinquefasciatus, ambos muy comunes en los ambientes tropicales de Colombia …

PDF

http://www.scielo.org.co/pdf/mvz/v20n3/v20n3a01.pdf

August 16, 2017 at 2:02 pm

Enhanced prophylaxis plus antiretroviral therapy for advanced HIV infection in Africa

N Engl J Med July 20, 2017 V.377 P.233-245.

James Hakim, F.R.C.P., Victor Musiime, Ph.D., Alex J. Szubert, M.Sc., Jane Mallewa, M.D., Abraham Siika, M.Med., Clara Agutu, M.B., Ch.B., M.P.H., Simon Walker, M.Sc., Sarah L. Pett, Ph.D., Mutsa Bwakura-Dangarembizi, M.Med., Abbas Lugemwa, M.D., Symon Kaunda, M.B., Ch.B., Mercy Karoney, M.Sc., Godfrey Musoro, M.Sc., Sheila Kabahenda, M.B., Ch.B., Kusum Nathoo, M.B., Ch.B., Kathryn Maitland, Ph.D., Anna Griffiths, Ph.D., Margaret J. Thomason, Ph.D., Cissy Kityo, M.Sc., Peter Mugyenyi, Ph.D., Andrew J. Prendergast, D.Phil., A. Sarah Walker, Ph.D., and Diana M. Gibb, M.D., for the REALITY Trial Team*

BACKGROUND

In sub-Saharan Africa, among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the rate of death from infection (including tuberculosis and cryptococcus) shortly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is approximately 10%.

METHODS

In this factorial open-label trial conducted in Uganda, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Kenya, we enrolled HIV-infected adults and children 5 years of age or older who had not received previous ART and were starting ART with a CD4+ count of fewer than 100 cells per cubic millimeter. They underwent simultaneous randomization to receive enhanced antimicrobial prophylaxis or standard prophylaxis, adjunctive raltegravir or no raltegravir, and supplementary food or no supplementary food. Here, we report on the effects of enhanced antimicrobial prophylaxis, which consisted of continuous trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole plus at least 12 weeks of isoniazid–pyridoxine (coformulated with trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole in a single fixed-dose combination tablet), 12 weeks of fluconazole, 5 days of azithromycin, and a single dose of albendazole, as compared with standard prophylaxis (trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole alone). The primary end point was 24-week mortality.

RESULTS

A total of 1805 patients (1733 adults and 72 children or adolescents) underwent randomization to receive either enhanced prophylaxis (906 patients) or standard prophylaxis (899 patients) and were followed for 48 weeks (loss to follow-up, 3.1%). The median baseline CD4+ count was 37 cells per cubic millimeter, but 854 patients (47.3%) were asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. In the Kaplan–Meier analysis at 24 weeks, the rate of death with enhanced prophylaxis was lower than that with standard prophylaxis (80 patients [8.9% vs. 108 [12.2%]; hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 0.98; P=0.03); 98 patients (11.0%) and 127 (14.4%), respectively, had died by 48 weeks (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.99; P=0.04). Patients in the enhanced-prophylaxis group had significantly lower rates of tuberculosis (P=0.02), cryptococcal infection (P=0.01), oral or esophageal candidiasis (P=0.02), death of unknown cause (P=0.03), and new hospitalization (P=0.03). However, there was no significant between-group difference in the rate of severe bacterial infection (P=0.32). There were nonsignificantly lower rates of serious adverse events and grade 4 adverse events in the enhanced-prophylaxis group (P=0.08 and P=0.09, respectively). Rates of HIV viral suppression and adherence to ART were similar in the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Among HIV-infected patients with advanced immunosuppression, enhanced antimicrobial prophylaxis combined with ART resulted in reduced rates of death at both 24 weeks and 48 weeks without compromising viral suppression or increasing toxic effects. (Funded by the Medical Research Council and others; REALITY Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN43622374.)

abstract

http://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1615822

PDF

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa1615822

 

N Engl J Med  July 20, 2017 V.377 P.283-284

EDITORIAL – The enduring challenge of advanced HIV infection.

Nathan Ford, M.P.H., Ph.D., and Meg Doherty, M.D., Ph.D.

Until recently, progress in the fight against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was primarily measured in terms of the number of patients who were started on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Major efforts to increase access to ART in the low- and middle-income countries that are most affected by HIV infection began in 2000, and over the following 15 years, an estimated 8 million HIV-related deaths were averted. In countries with a high burden of disease, this decline translated into important increases in life expectancy.1

Notwithstanding these gains, the decrease in HIV-associated deaths appears to have plateaued in recent years. HIV still causes more than 1 million deaths per year worldwide and remains a leading cause of death and complications in sub-Saharan Africa.1 A key explanation for this enduring high mortality is that despite an evolution toward offering treatment earlier in the course of the disease,2 HIV continues to be identified in a substantial number of patients with advanced infection (which is defined by the World Health Organization [WHO] as a CD4+ count of fewer than 200 cells per cubic millimeter). A recent study of trends across 55 countries showed that more than a third (37%) of the patients who initiated ART in 2015 already had advanced HIV infection.3 Such patients are at high risk for death, even after starting ART (which can increase the inflammatory response), and the risk increases with a decreasing CD4+ count.3 A worrisome new trend that has been observed in countries with long-standing HIV treatment programs is an increase in the number of patients who present for care with advanced HIV infection after a period of treatment interruption…..

abstract

http://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMe1707598

PDF

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMe1707598

 

August 11, 2017 at 8:27 am

2017-07 Guidelines for the managing advanced HIV disease and rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy. WHO 56 pags

Overview

The objectives of these guidelines are to provide recommendations outlining a public health approach to managing people presenting with advanced HIV disease, and to provide guidance on the timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all people living with HIV.

The first set of recommendations addresses the specific needs of people with advanced HIV disease and defines a package of interventions aimed at reducing HIV-associated morbidity and mortality. WHO recommends that a package of screening, prophylaxis, rapid ART initiation and intensified adherence interventions be offered to everyone living with HIV presenting with advanced disease. This is a strong recommendation that applies to all populations and age groups. The guidelines also include an algorithm to support decision making for providing care for people with advanced HIV disease.

The second set of recommendations defines how rapidly ART should be initiated within the context of the “treat all” policy, especially when coinfections are present. WHO strongly recommends that rapid ART initiation should be offered to people living with HIV following confirmed diagnosis and clinical assessment. Rapid initiation of ART is defined as within seven days of HIV diagnosis. WHO further strongly recommends ART initiation on the same day as HIV diagnosis based on the person’s willingness and readiness to start ART immediately, unless there are clinical reasons to delay treatment. Both of these recommendations apply to all populations and age groups. People with advanced HIV disease should be given priority for clinical assessment and treatment initiation.

PDF

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/255884/1/9789241550062-eng.pdf?ua=1

August 7, 2017 at 9:56 am

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