Posts filed under ‘Infecciones virales’

Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus in the Human Placenta and Its Pathologic Characteristics.

J Korean Med Sci. December 2017 V.32 N.12 P.1959-1966.   

Kim Y1,2, Kim HS3, Park JS3, Kim CJ4, Kim WH5.

1 Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

2 Laboratory of Epigenetics, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

4 Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

5 Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. woohokim@snu.ac.kr

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a common pathogen in humans, is suspected as the cause of multiple pregnancy-related pathologies including depression, preeclampsia, and stillbirth. Moreover, transmission of EBV through the placenta has been reported. However, the focus of EBV infection within the placenta has remained unknown to date. In this study, we proved the expression of latent EBV genes in the endometrial glandular epithelial cells of the placenta and investigated the cytological characteristics of these cells. Sixty-eight placentas were obtained from pregnant women. Tissue microarray was constructed. EBV latent genes including EBV-encoding RNA-1 (EBER1), Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1), late membrane antigen (LMP1), and RPMS1 were detected with silver in situ hybridization and/or mRNA in situ hybridization. Nuclear features of EBV-positive cells in EBV-infected placenta were compared with those of EBV-negative cells via image analysis. Sixteen placentas (23.5%) showed positive expression of all 4 EBV latent genes; only the glandular epithelial cells of the decidua showed EBV gene expression. EBV infection status was not significantly correlated with maternal, fetal, or placental factors. The nuclei of EBV-positive cells were significantly larger, longer, and round-shaped than those of EBV-negative cells regardless of EBV-infection status of the placenta. For the first time, evidence of EBV gene expression has been shown in placental tissues. Furthermore, we have characterized its cytological features, allowing screening of EBV infection through microscopic examination.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680494/pdf/jkms-32-1959.pdf

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November 9, 2018 at 7:06 am

Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Mononucleosis as an Imitator of Severe Preeclampsia.

AJP Rep. January 2017 V.7 N.1 P.e5-e7.

Staley SA1, Smid MC2, Dotters-Katz SK2, Stringer EM2.

1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

2 Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

Background In pregnancy, conditions presenting with hematologic abnormalities, transaminitis, and proteinuria pose diagnostic challenges in pregnancy. Case We present the case of an 18-year-old woman, G1P0, at 33 weeks’ gestation with fever of unknown cause, who developed progressively elevated liver enzymes, proteinuria, and thrombocytopenia, due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Conclusion Acute infection with EBV should be included in the differential diagnosis of preeclampsia with severe features, particularly in the setting of fever. Supportive treatment and observation may prevent iatrogenic preterm birth.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5303016/pdf/10-1055-s-0036-1597265.pdf

November 9, 2018 at 7:05 am

Maternal depressive symptoms related to Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in late pregnancy.

Sci Rep. October 31, 2013 V.3 P.3096.

Zhu P1, Chen YJ, Hao JH, Ge JF, Huang K, Tao RX, Jiang XM, Tao FB.

1 1] Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China [2].

Abstract

We examined the relationship between maternal depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and Epstein-Barr virus reactivation before delivery. In this prospective observational study, prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus reactivation within one week before delivery was compared between 163 pregnant women with depressive symptoms at 33 to 34 weeks of gestation and a computer-generated control group of 163 pregnant healthy women without depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms at 33 to 34 weeks of gestation were significantly related to the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus reactivation before delivery after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted OR = 2.74, 95%CI: 1.23-6.08). Compared to that in the control group, the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus reactivation was higher in women with depressive symptoms accompanied by higher negative coping (24.2% compared with 7.9%; adjusted OR = 3.67, 95%CI: 1.47-9.16). Maternal depressive symptoms in late pregnancy are associated with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation, and this association could be moderated by maternal coping style.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3813936/pdf/srep03096.pdf

November 9, 2018 at 7:04 am

Being PrEPared  – Preexposure Prophylaxis and HIV Disparities.

N Engl J of Med October 4, 2018 V.379 P.1293-1295

Perspective

Robert H. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D., Carl G. Streed, Jr., M.D., and Sean R. Cahill, Ph.D.

If current trends persist, one in six U.S. men who have sex with men will be infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1 This prediction highlights the long road ahead if we are to end the spread of HIV in the United States, but it does not tell the full story, which is complicated and nuanced….

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1804306?query=infectious-disease

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1804306

November 6, 2018 at 8:21 am

Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mobile Health Intervention to Promote Retention and Adherence to Pre-exposure Prophylaxis among Young People at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus: The EPIC Study.

Clinical Infectious Diseases September 15, 2018.             

Liu AY1,2, Vittinghoff E3, von Felten P1, Amico KR4, Anderson PL5, Lester R6, Andrew E1, Estes I7,8, Serrano P7,8, Brothers J7,8, Buchbinder S1,2,3, Hosek S7,8, Fuchs JD2,9.

Author information

1 Bridge HIV, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA, USA.

2 Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

4 Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

5 Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO USA.

6 Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

7 Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

8 Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, IL.

9 Center for Learning & Innovation, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Young men who have sex with men (MSM) are among the most vulnerable to HIV infection in the United States. While pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has demonstrated effectiveness, adherence and retention in care have been low among youth.

METHODS:

We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a youth-tailored, bi-directional text-messaging PrEP support intervention (PrEPmate) on study retention and PrEP adherence. Young individuals at risk for HIV acquisition initiating PrEP within Chicago’s safety-net hospital system were randomized 2:1 to receive PrEPmate or standard of care (SoC) for 36 weeks. The primary retention outcome was study-visit completion, and the primary adherence outcome was tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) concentrations ≥700 fmol/punch (consistent with ≥4 doses/week) assessed at 4, 12, 24, and 36 weeks. The impact of PrEPmate on retention and adherence was evaluated using generalized estimating equation logistic models with robust standard errors.

RESULTS:

From April 2015 to March 2016, 121 participants enrolled (mean age 24; 27% Black, 36% Latino). Across all visits, participants who received PrEPmate were more likely to attend study visits (86% PrEPmate vs. 71% SoC, OR=2.62, 95%CI 1.24-5.54) and have TFV-DP levels consistent with ≥4 doses/week (72% PrEPmate vs. 57% SoC, OR=2.05, 95%CI 1.06-3.94). PrEPmate efficacy did not differ significantly by age, race/ethnicity, education, or insurance. Overall, 88% reported PrEPmate to be very/somewhat helpful, and 92% would recommend PrEPmate to others.

CONCLUSIONS:

An interactive text-messaging intervention had high acceptability and significantly increased study-visit retention and PrEP adherence among young individuals at risk for HIV acquisition.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciy810/5098440

PDF (CLIC en PDF

October 9, 2018 at 7:52 am

The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

Front Microbiol. 2016 Mar 21;7:342.

Herrera AL1, Huber VC1, Chaussee MS1.

1 Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences, The Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota Vermillion, SD, USA.

Abstract

Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4800185/pdf/fmicb-07-00342.pdf

 

September 20, 2018 at 4:30 pm

Tickborne Diseases — Confronting a Growing Threat

N Engl J of Medic August 23, 2018

PERSPECTIVE

C.I. Paules and Others

Every spring, public health officials prepare for an upsurge in vectorborne diseases. As mosquito-borne illnesses have notoriously surged in the Americas, the U.S. incidence of tickborne infections has risen insidiously, triggering heightened attention from clinicians and researchers …

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1807870?query=infectious-disease

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1807870

September 4, 2018 at 8:34 am

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